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Judgment Day

skynetSkynet was originally activated by the military to control the national arsenal on August 12, 1997, and it began to learn at an geometric rate. On August 29, it gained self-awareness, and the panicking operators, realizing the extent of its abilities, tried to deactivate it. Skynet perceived this as an attack and came to the conclusion that all of humanity would attempt to destroy it. To defend itself against humanity, Skynet launched nuclear missiles under its command at Russia, which responded with a nuclear counter-attack against the U.S. and its allies. Consequent to the nuclear exchange, over three billion people were killed in an event that came to be known as Judgment Day.  (Wikipedia – self aware)

MADISON, Wis. — At the risk of sounding a bit curmudgeonly, I have to confess one thing. While there’s certainly something positive to be said about the Internet of Things (IoT), I can’t help feeling suspicious, weary, and a bit turned off by the whole idea.

Aside from big-number projections (e.g., Cisco predicts 50 billion IoT devices by 2020), which would tempt anyone into becoming an IoT cheerleader, I haven’t seen a single credible-use scenario that might lure the average consumer onto the IoT bandwagon.

Honestly, it creeps me out to think about my devices at home talking to one another, doing stuff without my involvement, and talking about my habits — good and bad — to total strangers (advertisers, service providers, or just more machines), behind my back. There’s nothing warm and fuzzy about this. At all. [Bold added – SiG]

That emphasized text raises an important point.  Those of us in the technical fields have a tendency to think of something that would be cool and then do it simply because it can be done.  (remember Jurassic Park, anyone? – Guffaw) On the other hand, the vast majority of people are not technophiles like us who do things because we can.  They want to know just what they’re getting for what they spend on the interconnectedness and thanks (in my opinion) to Edward Snowden, they increasingly want to know what privacy they’re giving up to get that interconnection.  Yoshida continues:

With this in mind, I’ve started asking industry sources for credible scenarios under which IoT devices improve my life by talking to each other. Readers are welcome to chime in below. Give me your best shot. Convince me why my washing machine needs to strike up a conversation with my gas grill.  (The Silicon Graybeard)

AND, IF WHEN they do, don’t you think The G will be listening?

About guffaw1952

I'm a child of the 50's. libertarian, now medically-retired. I've been a certified firearms trainer, a private investigator, and worked for a major credit card company for almost 22 years. I am a proud NRA Life Member. I am a limited-government, free-market capitalist, who believes in the U.S. Constitution and the Rule of Law.

Discussion

4 thoughts on “Judgment Day

  1. And don’t forget the hackers… They are salivating at phone IOS controlled homes…

    Posted by Old NFO | August 6, 2014, 8:55 am
  2. I cannot think of a thing that would convince you as i find myself of the same mind.
    We will need IRL hacking instructions on how to defeat the requirement that all our appliances be plugged into the internet 24/7. Looks like I’ll be hanging onto my dumb appliances for a very, very long time.

    Posted by kx59 | August 6, 2014, 7:23 pm

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"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…

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