you're reading...
'everything that's old is new again', action, agenda, America, anger, choices, crime, culture, debate, dysfunction, emotion, First Amendment, frustration, justice, law enforcement interaction, military, MLK, protest, race-relations, remembering, tactics

I’ve Wondered About This…

I’m old enough to remember the Watts riots in L.A., Detroit.  Rodney King?  And a multitude of others.  And something has always bothered me:

WHY do these folks feel the need to violently destroy THEIR OWN NEIGHBORHOODS to make a point?

In days of yore, I participated in protests.  I remember one at the State Capitol, wherein we stood in the Summer heat (all 250 or so of us) to protest The Clinton so-called ‘Assault Weapons Ban’, and our own State legislature considering similar legislation.  This was in the 90’s – the temperature was around 100°.

And not one of us engaged in violence, criminal looting or destruction.  We had been advised not to come armed, and we didn’t.  We carried signs (and American flags), signed petitions, talked amongst ourselves and drank lots of water.  And listened politely to speakers like Sheriff Mack.  And watched media trucks circle us deciding whether or not we were worth a spot on the 10 o’clock news.

Apparently we weren’t.

Here’s one opinion as to why they foul their own nests:

The borderline-Jacobins at Slate, who believe spanking is child abuse, and personal responsibility is out of fashion, try to explain looting away as a social phenomenon: “Why would anyone burn down the only CVS in their neighborhood?”

The reason, I think, is likely the same reason that poor black Americans in cities across the country burned “their own” neighborhoods in the late 1960s:

They did not experience those places as their own. Then, like now, police brutality was a precipitating cause of the violence, but it was the long-term experience of the indignities of the ghetto that gave shape to the riots. Then, like now, commentators compared the rioters to animals who had run wild and needed discipline. Rioting, to these bystanders, was not proper political protest but the criminal actions of poor people who merely wanted to grab what they could for free. This narrative, which I heard throughout my childhood growing up in Baltimore in the 1980s, put the blame not on the depredations of the ghetto, but on the character of its residents. It completely misapprehends the political economy of our poorest neighborhoods.

In other words:  they riot because society has ignored them.  Not only is that a specious argument, but it also highlights the fact that Baltimore hasn’t had a Republican mayor since 1968So which party is responsible for ignoring the downtrodden social class?

Told another way, Abraham Miller at National Review wrote:

More @ Red State
Of course, the writer above seems to think the only answer lies with which flavor of government.
What do YOU think?
h/t Brock Townsend
Advertisements

About guffaw1952

I'm a child of the 50's. libertarian, now medically-retired. I've been a certified firearms trainer, a private investigator, and worked for a major credit card company for almost 22 years. I am a proud NRA Life Member. I am a limited-government, free-market capitalist, who believes in the U.S. Constitution and the Rule of Law.

Discussion

2 thoughts on “I’ve Wondered About This…

  1. I believe there are three reasons for this. One is simply because they have no ownership of the neighborhoods they are rioting in. They don’t own property, have no pride of place etc, so tearing it up is easy. It is even easier when you can go back to your government provided tenement at the end of the riot. Two is because they can ‘t really go to better neighbohoods to riot there. They would have to be bussed in or provided subway fare or walk (horrors) and in any event if the Baltimore rioters had headed to the neighborhood the mayor lived in they would of been stopped violently and decisively by the police. Thirdly and this applies to the riots overall, they know they can get away with it. Some of them will be arrested, but few if any ever prosecuted or punished in any meaningful manor. The reward is some free stuff, a little fame on TV and something to brag about when setting around in the ghetto in later years.

    Posted by Matt | May 6, 2015, 10:44 am

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…

%d bloggers like this: