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Standing On Principles

gayI like to think I have Principles

I like to think I stand on them, and admire those who do also.

Unless, of course, their principles are diametrically opposed to mine!

One would think that working as a county clerk, and gay marriage was upheld by The Supreme Court, and licensing gays violated my principles, that it would behoove me to look for employment elsewhere(?)

The same thing applies to pharmacists who dislike dispensing a ‘morning after’ pill to their customers.

Or going to work at the Walmart sporting goods department, and being told you must sell guns and ammunition.  And you are anti-gun.

This just in – an Islamic flight attendant is objecting to be required to serve her passengers alcohol!  (as if she didn’t know this going in!)

If working there and doing your assigned job violates your principles – QUIT!

There’s an old saw, emblazoned on many a sampler and kitschy poster, stating “When you work for a man, WORK for him!”

Perhaps the women in the news are hoping to become another cause celebre, and make it to the Supreme Court?

In another lifetime.

I’m certainly not pristine in holding to my principles.  I AM human.  I worked for a polygraph company (not as a polygrapher) and federal legislation was pending to severely restrict private polygraph pre-employment companies.  (It passed).  But the boss had us calling in on company time (we were getting paid to do this) in an effort to sway the Congress to not pass the bill.

And, having had some (not all) negative experiences with polygraphs, I privately supported the legislation.

But, I also needed a paycheck, so…

I chose getting a paycheck over standing on my principles.

I was laid-off six months later, regardless, I’m sure in part to the decreased company revenue.

I probably should have quit.

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About guffaw1952

I'm a child of the 50's. libertarian, now medically-retired. I've been a certified firearms trainer, a private investigator, and worked for a major credit card company for almost 22 years. I am a proud NRA Life Member. I am a limited-government, free-market capitalist, who believes in the U.S. Constitution and the Rule of Law.

Discussion

10 thoughts on “Standing On Principles

  1. Would someone tell me what law ? No law has been oassed to alliw the County Clerk to ussue homosexuaks a marriage license. A SCOTUS decision can only uphold, strike down or return to the state a law, it can not create a law.

    Posted by Highlander | September 5, 2015, 3:49 pm
  2. We do what we have to… nuff said…

    Posted by Old NFO | September 5, 2015, 5:58 pm
  3. KY law very specifically states marriage is ONLY between one man and one woman. She took an oath to uphold KY law, and she is doing so. It is not unusual for the Supreme Court to issue rulings contrary to both the Constitution and morality. Would you also require that she return an escaped slave to its “owner”? That was the court-upheld law of the land that many people – Quakers come to mind – risked jail to defy.

    Right now, in certain states like Virginia, clergy who will not perform homosexual “marriages” are at risk of prosecution. Because of state law. Many have petitioned the state to recind their ability to perform marriages because of it.

    Homosexuals have a disorder of attraction. Just like those who are sexually attracted to children have a disorder of attraction, just like those who are sexually attracted to animals have a disorder of attraction. The only difference is that being homosexual is currently popular. And that a tiny percentage of the population wishes not to have equality, but to gain dominance over those they hate. People like me. People like my clergy. You most likely know people who have the other mentioned disorders. But they aren’t politically correct and so aren’t “out of the closet.”

    Posted by ProudHillbilly | September 5, 2015, 9:05 pm
    • SCOTUS has made their decision. Correctly or otherwise. I’m not re-arguing the case, but many States have chosen the path of least resistance. They do not make law, but they do interpret them and affect their enforcement.
      Nor am I debating the morality or dysfunctionality of homosexuality.
      The clerk certainly has a right to her opinion. And consequences to holding it.
      As we all do.

      Posted by guffaw1952 | September 6, 2015, 7:51 am
  4. And, btw, sorry you’ve bought into the “it makes me feel good so I’ll dance with it” culture. But since when is refusing to issue a marriage license the equivelent of tossing people off of a building? And how flat out ignorant do you have to be to make that comparison?

    Posted by ProudHillbilly | September 5, 2015, 9:27 pm
    • I’ve not bought into anything.
      Nor did I draw the cartoon.
      Just because I post something doesn’t necessarily mean I hold to it 100%.
      SOMETIMES, it’s just to obtain a reaction, which I obviously have.
      I was trying to make a point regarding one doing one’s job versus holding to one’s beliefs – which is sometimes in opposition.
      The Muslim woman refusing to serve alcohol, for example.
      And this clerk was refusing to provide service based on her religious beliefs, not by quoting Ky. statutes.
      Obviously, in a number of cases, I failed in making my point, to the extent of being called ignorant.

      Posted by guffaw1952 | September 6, 2015, 7:59 am

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