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Mental Illness = No Gun(?)

Not necessarily.  🙂

From Claire:

Despite using annoying “gun violence” language, this CNN article brings the good news that mental health professionals aren’t likely to sit still for Obama administration attempts to label every mentally ill person as too dangerous to own a firearm. With statistics, even!

I know there is a meme out there wherein the gummint is actively pursuing all avenues to make firearms ownership difficult, complex, and ne’er impossible.

I believe this to be true.

However (see above).

SHHH…It’s A Conspiracy!

‘Regular’ readers know I subscribe to the Conspiracy Theory of History.  Basically, stuff happens before, during and after an event that the ‘winners’ never bother to write down.

The sausage being made, as it were.

AND IF WE KNEW THE WHOLE TRUTH…

The latest in this meme involves the passing of the Associate Supreme Court Justice Scalia.

Because being a 79 year old overweight man means one couldn’t pass away normally…

died

There is an undercurrent on some blogs, which are conservative and libertarian in nature, that the Associate Justice was MURDERED.  Reports of a pillow case over his head(or head-adjacent)…

Now, I wouldn’t put it past certain elements of the progressive machine to wish such an event to occur, but…

Evidence would be nice.  Something…

(I think someone’s been re-reading The Pelican Brief.)

h/t Facebook

Geeks And Guns

My friend Borepatch posted this recently:

Things I did not know

Eric S. Raymond (computer guru and gun nut) has a Gun Nut web page.  There’s an interesting collection of links there for gunnies.

There’s quite a strong correlation between people who work in tech (and especially in computer/network security) and people who shoot.  I haven’t seen data on this but it is quite striking.  My guess is that people in these fields are focused on assessing and managing risk, and are used to using tools to help manage those risks.

Now, I am at best a proto geek (or sometimes geek-adjacent) but I definitely concur with BP!  A substantial number of shooters known to me are either educated in the technologies, or at-the-very-least well-read.

Very few are lesser-educated.

Simple Dreams

As with art (and so many other things) I may not know it, but I know what I like.

And I like love Linda Ronstadt!

In the early 1970’s, Dave (the genius mechanic) introduced me to Linda Ronstadt’s music.  Being a lonely guy in my 20’s, her torchy rock (a term coined by Time magazine) was just the ticket!  I bought and listened to many of her albums, and even was lucky enough to take a fine blond lady named Ali to her concert here, at the Veteran’s Memorial Coliseum, in 1979.

In the late 70’s Playboy magazine called her “the best White pipes in the business.”  I agree.

Like so many other entertainment types, unfortunately, she chose the platform built by her music to expound on things political.  She even dated Jerry Brown for a while.

But, her music continued to soar, and she kept experimenting.  From popular standards (with Nelson Riddle arranging!) to Gilbert and Sullivan and even La Boheme!

I don’t get the opportunity to acquire CDs as I used to, and have never gotten used to digital music.  So it saddened me to learn that she is suffering from Hashimoto’s thyroiditis, and now Parkinson’s disease.

She retired from singing and can no longer perform, in 2009.

She has written a musical autobiography, entitled Simple Dreams, which good friend Biff just gifted me.  It details her musical education, growth and evolution, from her Mexican-emigre’ family in Tucson, to her Malibu beach house and beyond.  And encounters with musical partners from the guys who later formed The Eagles, to Dolly Parton and even Frank Sinatra!

If she interests you, I highly recommend the book.  It would be considered name-dropping, if she weren’t so talented.

(FTC – I get nothing except musical entertainment from Ms. Ronstadt!)

Phteven

Because I’ve not guffawed in a while, and need to…

77b5468af296a7c49458

h/t Wirecutter

Yep, It Happens Everywhere!

There’s a popular meme regarding firearms possession and safety:

Do you have your gun; it’s a bad neighborhood!?

As though crime doesn’t occur in ‘good’ neighborhoods…

(from my dear friend Brigid)

Stay in the Boat

True Blue Sam the blogger is someone perhaps just a few of you know as a long time friend and commenter here.  He’s also something more special. He’s my father in law. He and my mother in law, both firearm owners and skilled and proficient shooters, had a home invasion on Thursday night. The person involved may have been high on drugs (I’m guessing meth) – he DID ransack one of the freezers in the garage, taking a ham hock, a tub of lard and some ocra.  Just saying.

No one was hurt, but there are lessons to be learned.  Not just the fact that the perp been detained earlier for a event, had a psyche eval (by Skype no less) and was released to continue his night of mayhem. But rapid response when this sort of thing happens. (Semi Auto is your friend).

We always worried that  being in the city that something like this would happen here, and in addition to our stickers shouting alarm system! we added extra bolts, top to frame  and bottom braced against a floor joist, for the walk out basement doors, in addition to cutting back shrubbery and adding extra lighting.

But this happened in a very quiet rural area, where the nearest “city” is houses, a barber shop and a church, just as they were heading to bed, and not thinking of defense.

Just some things to think about folks and we’re just thankful they are safe, though a vehicle was stolen and totaled (after getting some serious air time during a chase through the woods) and there was a lot of damage to the home as the perp used firewood outside to break out several windows in an attempt to get into the main house before hitting the garage.

First of all, thank God everyone is safe and well!
And ‘safe neighborhoods’?  No such thing!
It’s not paranoia if a threat really exists!

There Is No Joy In Mudville

Associate Supreme Court Justice Scalia has passed away.

R.I.P. Sir!

Having said this (from The Wall Street Journal)…

Justice Antonin Scalia

Associated Press

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, who died Saturday at the age of 79, will be remembered as one of the court’s most influential, trenchant and controversial voices. Below are a few outtakes from some of the more influential and notable opinions from his storied, 30-year career on the court.

•D.C. v. Heller (2008) By a 5-4 vote, the Supreme Court struck down Washington, D.C.’s blanket ban on handguns, ruling for the first time that the Second Amendment confers a right to bear arms in one’s home. Justice Scalia wrote the majority opinion.

There are many reasons that a citizen may prefer a handgun for home defense: It is easier to store in a location that is readily accessible in an emergency; it cannot easily be redirected or wrestled away by an attacker; it is easier to use for those without the upper-body strength to lift and aim a long gun; it can be pointed at a burglar with one hand while the other hand dials the police. Whatever the reason, handguns are the most popular weapon chosen by Americans for self-defense in the home, and a complete prohibition of their use is invalid.

• Kyllo v. U.S. (2001) The court ruled that the government couldn’t use thermal imaging technology to detect a suspected marijuana-growing operation without a warrant. Justice Scalia wrote that the use of sense-enhancing technology not in public use to gain information within the home constituted a search under the Fourth Amendment.

We have said that the Fourth Amendment draws “a firm line at the entrance to the house…That line, we think, must be not only firm but also bright which requires clear specification of those methods of surveillance that require a warrant. While it is certainly possible to conclude from the videotape of the thermal imaging that occurred in this case that no “significant” compromise of the homeowner’s privacy has occurred, we must take the long view, from the original meaning of the Fourth Amendment forward.

• Printz v. U.S. (1997) The court held, 5-4, that a federal law requiring local law enforcement to conduct background checks on gun purchases was unconstitutional. Justice Scalia wrote that the federal government may not compel the states to enact or administer federal programs.

Congress cannot circumvent that prohibition by conscripting the States’ officers directly. The Federal Government may neither issue directives requiring the States to address particular problems, nor command the States’ officers, or those of their political subdivisions, to administer or enforce a federal regulatory program. It matters not whether policymaking is involved, and no case by case weighing of the burdens or benefits is necessary; such commands are fundamentally incompatible with our constitutional system of dual sovereignty.

• Vernonia School District v. Acton (1995) The court ruled 6-3 that public schools could randomly drug test student athletes. Justice Scalia wrote that the privacy interests compromised by giving urine samples under the district’s policy were negligible.

 Just as when the government conducts a search in its capacity as employer (a warrantless search of an absent employee’s desk to obtain an urgently needed file, for example), the relevant question is whether that intrusion upon privacy is one that a reasonable employer might engage in, see O’Connor v. Ortega, 480 U. S. 709 (1987); so also when the government acts as guardian and tutor the relevant question is whether the search is one that a reasonable guardian and tutor might undertake. Given the findings of need made by the District Court, we conclude that in the present case it is.

• RAV v. City of St. Paul (1992) Justice Scalia wrote the majority opinion in which the court struck down St. Paul, Minn.’s crime banning “hate-crime,” for violating the First Amendment’s free-speech guarantee.In so doing, the court tossed aside charges against a group of teenagers that burned a cross in the yard of an African-American family.

The dispositive question in this case, therefore, is whether content discrimination is reasonably necessary to achieve St. Paul’s [p396] compelling interests; it plainly is not. An ordinance not limited to the favored topics, for example, would have precisely the same beneficial effect. In fact, the only interest distinctively served by the content limitation is that of displaying the city council’s special hostility towards the particular biases thus singled out. [n8] That is precisely what the First Amendment forbids. The politicians of St. Paul are entitled to express that hostility — but not through the means of imposing unique limitations upon speakers who (however benightedly) disagree.

* * * *

Let there be no mistake about our belief that burning a cross in someone’s front yard is reprehensible. But St. Paul has sufficient means at its disposal to prevent such behavior without adding the First Amendment to the fire.

The Internet is rife with both praise and derision for this Justice.  I shan’t post the hateful texts here.  There is Great Fear amongst the conservative and libertarian elements of society that without his swing vote, and Constitutionally-measured opinions, that ‘we’ (civil libertarians, gun owners/carriers, and American Society at large) are doomed.  Doomed to the progressive, post-Constitution era of further governmental intrusion on rights, and final loss of the America in which we were raised.

His body wasn’t even cold, when The President announced he would find a suitable replacement, and (some) Republicans suggested The Senate block ANY appointment for the next eleven months (until the next President could be sworn in)!

In other words, politics as usual.

God Save The United States Of America (while I’m still allowed to post this!)

The Social Contract – Endgame

lockeThose of you who have read (political) History are familiar with John Locke, and his concept of the Social Contract(?)  You remember, the idea that ‘We The People’ make a Contract with those we ‘choose’ to govern us(?)

The basis for The Declaration of Independence.

Well, here is a prime (negative) example.

(courtesy of Joel)

Hey, remember last month when Virginia’s Attorney General threw CCW holders under the bus?

Well, good news, everyone! Governor Terry McAuliffe and “republican leaders” have concluded a series of backroom agreements that restores reciprocity, sort of, and all the repubs and the NRA had to give away was any hope of Virginia gun owners ever feeling safe from the state…

In exchange, Republicans softened their stances on issues that have long been non-starters in the GOP-controlled General Assembly. Under the deal, the state would take guns away from anyone who was under a two-year protective order for domestic-violence offenses. And State Police would have to attend all gun shows to provide background checks for private sellers if they requested the service.

So everything’s cool, Virginia, except that you better never get your wife mad at you and there’ll be armed goons looking over your shoulder any time you think it might be fun to pop into a gun show. But other than that, yay! Say hey for the beauties of compromise, I guess…

Of course, there’s that pesky (federal) Lautenberg Amendment thing, too.

When we make a contract with government, there is ALWAYS the other side to the contract.  Their codicil spelling out our duties and responsibilities under the ‘agreement’.

Because they never just give us anything – not when they can use a hook!

Bill And Hill Are Just Poor Folk

clinton_top-600The Clinton’s reportedly made $76,000 per day last year!

https://t.co/IFzMU0j7Fp

— FOX & Friends (@foxandfriends) February 11, 2016

Homeland Insecurity

From Wirecutter:

Hundreds of badges, credentials, cell phones and guns belonging to Department of Homeland Security employees have been lost or stolen in recent years — raising serious security concerns about the potential damage these missing items could do in the wrong hands.

Inventory reports, obtained by the news site Complete Colorado and shared with FoxNews.com, show that over 1,300 badges, 165 firearms and 589 cell phones were lost or stolen over the span of 31 months between 2012 and 2015.
MORE

Nothing like having the umbrella agency named for this Republic’s security not-so-secure. Makes one feel all warm, doesn’t it?

I remember back-in-the-day (pre-9/11) reading in Hoover’s FBI, if you lost your creds, you were fired.  Obviously, times have changed.

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…