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Training Classes Do Not Make For A Better Shooter

(from TFB)

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According to Tim Herron of Team Sig Sauer there is a lot of misinformation from Armchair Experts. He breaks down five things he advises to be a better shooter.

  1. Dryfire. It’s real. And it works. It also costs NOTHING but an investment of your time and the benefits are endless.
  2. Training Classes do not make a better shooter. Practicing what you learn from those classes is what makes you a better shooter. Training classes merely gives you new ideas to practice on.
  3. Gear is never the answer. You can improve with what you have.
  4. Focus your practice on purposeful things. Things that really apply. Literal tons of repetitions both in dryfire and live fire and immense amount of PURPOSEFUL rounds down range.
  5. Finally, stop with the delusions of self grandeur. Want to start truly improving? Quit BS’ing each other on the Internet and get your rear end to work. You don’t learn this stuff by osmosis. And you certainly don’t get better at any of this by repeating the baseless BS you read or heard some supposed “hardcore operator or competitor” say out of context to someone else 3rd person.

Tim has some good points and some of them seem obvious. However I do argue against the “gear is never the answer”. If gear is not the answer then why do people not compete with Hipoints? To a certain degree gear matters. There is a reason people don’t use Uncle Mike’s holsters for serious shooting.  Also gear can help with some shortcomings one may have. For example, red dots on handguns is easier and quicker for people with poor eyesight.

What are you thoughts on Tim’s analysis and advice? To read his entire article check it out here at MASF.

Being an ‘armchair expert’, I resemble that remark!  🙂  Seriously, I no longer have the means to get to the range (or the desert) on a regular basis.  And my ‘edge’ (if I ever had one) has significantly rounded.  😦

Having said that, dreaming of more or better gear (if only I had another, different, newer gun…) or (if I had the opportunity) tossing lead downrange at paper villains willy-nilly doesn’t solve the problem!  It doesn’t even address it.

Because there’s no focus.  No purpose (see above).

Yeah, plinking is loads of fun, but doesn’t sharpen one’s skill set.  Muscle memory is degradable.

HOWEVER, dry practice (the aforementioned dry firing), coupled with presentation, trigger control, sight picture and compressed-surprise brake can make for a fun and valuable learning experience!  And an inexpensive means of keeping up one’s skill set.

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About guffaw1952

I'm a child of the 50's. libertarian, now medically-retired. I've been a certified firearms trainer, a private investigator, and worked for a major credit card company for almost 22 years. I am a proud NRA Life Member. I am a limited-government, free-market capitalist, who believes in the U.S. Constitution and the Rule of Law.

Discussion

4 thoughts on “Training Classes Do Not Make For A Better Shooter

  1. I have a target on the fireplace, every time I see an ad with an O in the title, I dry fire with a SIRT pistol at the target. 🙂

    Posted by Old NFO | July 31, 2016, 2:06 pm
  2. Obviously taking a class in ANYTHING doesn’t improve a person unless they then apply the principles.
    Doesn’t matter if it’s shooting, golf, bowling or badminton. 🙂

    Posted by KM | August 1, 2016, 12:43 am

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