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guffaw1952

I'm a child of the 50's. libertarian, now medically-retired. I've been a certified firearms trainer, a private investigator, and worked for a major credit card company for almost 22 years. I am a proud NRA Life Member. I am a limited-government, free-market capitalist, who believes in the U.S. Constitution and the Rule of Law.
guffaw1952 has written 2426 posts for Guffaw in AZ

Cellular Telephone Security

Remember the old adage, “Never put anything into email you don’t want someone else to read.”

(Secretary Clinton, are you listening?)

Of course, with modern security software and pass codes (etc.) we needn’t worry about that with our smartphones, right?

(from Bayou Renaissance Man)

So you think your smartphone is secure?

Not according to CBS’s ’60 Minutes’ program.

Hering is a hacker himself, he’s the 30-something whiz who cofounded the mobile security company “Lookout” when he was 23. Lookout has developed a free app that scans your mobile phone for malware and alerts the user to an attack.

Sharyn Alfonsi: How likely is it that somebody’s phone has been hacked?

John Hering: In today’s world there’s really only — two types of companies or two types of people which are those who have been hacked and realize it and those who have been hacked and haven’t.

Sharyn Alfonsi: How much do you think people have been kind of ignoring the security of their cellphones, thinking, “I’ve got a passcode, I must be fine?”

John Hering: I think that most people have not really thought about their phones as computers. And that’s really starting to shift.

Sharyn Alfonsi: And that’s what you think– it’s like having a laptop now?

John Hering: Oh absolutely. I mean, your mobile phone is effectively a supercomputer in your pocket. There’s more technology in your mobile phone than was in, you know, the space craft that took man to the moon. I mean, it’s — it’s really unbelievable.

Sharyn Alfonsi: Is everything hackable?

John Hering: Yes.

Sharyn Alfonsi: Everything?

John Hering: Yes.

Sharyn Alfonsi: If somebody tells you, “You can’t do it.”

John Hering: I don’t believe it.

There’s much more at the link.  Highly recommended – and disturbing – reading.

Peter

So, about that porn you’ve been sneaking a peek at on your lunch hour…
PS – I saw a recent interview with Jim Caviezel, John Reese of Person of Interest (Season 5 – probably the last – starts TONIGHT 05/03/2016!).  He was asked if he changed any of his habits in real life, having done a political science fiction TV series about rampant surveillance.  He responded he is thoughtful regarding what he says in cellular telephone calls, and ELIMINATED THE INTERNET FROM HIS HOME!  Said he doesn’t need it!  Food for thought…

Survivalism Is Not Necessarily Ludditism

Joel writes:

Things that aren’t necessities but may as well be

61S3ZUWlhAL._SX337_BO1,204,203,200_
I have a book that a reader sent me a year or two ago – and I apologize but I don’t remember who sent it – It’s about a guy who took it into his head to semi-retire into the Alaskan outback, near or above the Arctic circle. You know, just go out there and build a cabin and live.

Now, that’s more-or-less the plot of Into the Wild, and I think we know how that story turned out. But this older guy, Richard Proenneke, wasn’t some overindulged and suicidally starry-eyed kid. He was an old Alaska hand and actually knew what he was doing. He built a cabin that was a literal work of art – after he got old and retired from retiring, it became a tourist attraction for really hardy tourists. It makes the Secret Lair look like a particularly disreputable shed. And he made nearly every part of it from native wood or stone or bone – hell, he carved wooden door hinges.

Every single thing he had that he couldn’t make himself had to be flown in on a little bush plane and it could only happen a few months out of the year, so space and weight were real factors. And I was looking at the photographs reproduced in the book – Proenneke was a photographer, and my only complaint about the book is there aren’t enough photographs – and in one shot of the cabin’s interior I saw…a roll of paper towels.

And I had me a chuckle. Now, here’s a package of six paper towel rolls, which I just bought today…
IMG_1322
It doesn’t weigh hardly anything, of course, but it’s bulky as hell. I suppose you could open the package and distribute the rolls around the plane, but my point is that if it needs to come by bush plane, you’d have to really want that roll of paper towels. Seems like there are more important things to which you could devote that plane space.

Except maybe there aren’t. When I was first alone out here, experimenting with ways to make due with virtually no income and really studying the difference between a want and a need, I learned that the line between the two is not always clear. Some commodities, while of course you can get along without them in the sense that you won’t actually die, are themselves so useful that it almost doesn’t matter. It’s not a question of life and death, it’s a question of quality of life. Indoor plumbing: Have I ever wasted a moment wishing I hadn’t devoted all that precious Lair space to an indoor toilet? Nope, not so much as a millisecond. To the best of my knowledge, and leaving poisonous spiders out of it, nobody ever died from using an outhouse as I originally planned. But a flush toilet is just such a massive improvement that, if you’ve got the water pressure, only an idiot would decide not to go ahead and dig for a septic system. Electricity’s the same way: Not a necessity of life, but look at all the things it makes possible.

Those are big things. There’s a myriad of little ones, like paper towels. It’s good to pay attention and learn what those things are, because it’s the little things that mark the difference between living and just surviving.

PAY ATTENTION – my personal motto.

I’ve found in my years that had I paid attention (or more attention) perhaps things would have turned our better or differently.  Perhaps not.

But almost always were worse for having not done so.

TAKE ACTION NOW, ARIZONANS!

ATTENTION ARIZONANS! – In my email, yesterday (Saturday, 04/30/2016)

Legislature ready to Adjourn

The Legislature has been working on the budget for the last few weeks.  Committee of the Whole (COW) hearings and floor votes on budget bills are expected to occur this coming week.  After the Legislature passes the budget we expect them to plow through all the remaining non-budget bills then adjourn the session by the end of the week. 

This may be your last chance
to tell your legislators to pass pro-rights legislation.

If you have not sent your letters to your legislators on the bills listed below, do not wait any longer.  A few mouse clicks on your part can make the difference on whether these bills pass or not.  Doing nothing is the same as supporting their defeat.

Contact Your Legislators!

HB 2081, which would prohibit checking with any federal (e.g., NICS) or state database on private property transfers, only needs to pass a Senate Third Read floor vote before being sent to the Governor.  Click here to send your letter to your Senator telling them to vote for HB 2081.

HB 2338, the AzCDL-requested bill that would prohibit the governing boards of educational institutions from banning firearms on public rights of way, such as city streets and sidewalks that happen to pass through campuses, only needs to pass a Senate Third Read floor vote before being sent to the Governor. Click here to send your letter to your Senator telling them to vote for HB 2338.

HB 2524, the AzCDL-requested bill that would establish an interstate compact that restricts member states from enacting firearms transfer requirements that are more restrictive than existing federal law, only needs to pass a Senate Third Read floor vote before being sent to the Governor.  Click here to send your letter to your Senator telling them to vote for HB 2524.

SB 1257, the AzCDL-requested bill that would exempt CCW permit holders from being disarmed when entering state and local government controlled property unless everyone entering is screened for weapons, only needs Senate concurrence and a Final Read Vote before being sent to the Governor.  Click here to send your message telling your Senator to vote for the passage of SB 1257.

From some of your emails, there appears to be some confusion about SB 1257. Passage of SB 1257 only applies to state and local government facilities.  It will not affect the existing law that allows those with valid CCW permits to carry discreetly in restaurants that serve alcohol that do not post “no weapons” signs.  Click here to send your message telling your Senator to vote for the passage of SB 1257.

SB 1266, which would allow for injunctions, fines and civil suits when state agencies or local governments disregard state firearm preemption statutes, only needs to pass a House Third Read floor vote before being sent to the Governor. Click here to send your letter to your Representatives telling them to vote for SB 1266.

The status and summary of bills that AzCDL is monitoring can be found on our Bill Tracking page.  You can find all the emails on the above bills addressed to your legislators, prepared and ready for you to send, at our Legislative Action Center’s Hot Issues page.

These alerts are a project of the Arizona Citizens Defense League (AzCDL), an all-volunteer, non-profit, non-partisan grassroots organization.

AzCDL –Protecting Your Freedom .

Copyright © 2016 Arizona Citizens Defense League, Inc., all rights reserved.

For the record, I made the effort.  It’s not difficult.

One click – Fill out your info.

Second click – SUBMIT

THE BEST PART IS THERE IS NO COST TO YOU TO SEND OUT YOUR SUPPORT FOR ANY OR ALL OF THESE BILLS TO YOUR ARIZONA STATE LEGISLATOR! (unlike some different organizational emails I have received…)

WHAT Are Those Four Rules, Again?

(from Free North Carolina)

https://i1.wp.com/wusa-download.edgesuite.net/video/2163306/2163306_Thumb.jpg
 Brilliant.

An officer in the Metropolitan Police Department’s first district “dry-fired” an unloaded weapon at the head of another officer during a roll-call meeting on Saturday afternoon, possibly under orders from a sergeant as part of a training exercise, four MPD sources tell WUSA9.

Those sources say a Sergeant later told officers in the room that they had secretly ordered the officer to unload his weapon and then pretend to fire on his colleague as part of a “training exercise” on situational awareness. The officer then pulled the trigger of the unloaded weapon while pointing it at the head of an officer until it audibly clicked, the sources say.

Both the officer who allegedly fired the weapon and the sergeant who allegedly ordered him are assigned to regular duties, pending an internal affairs investigation, MPD spokesman Sean Hickman tells WUSA9.

“I can tell you there are about seven different versions of the incident that are out there,” MPD Chief Cathy Lanier told reporters on Monday. “I’m not sure which or how many of those that you’ve heard, but I prefer to wait until I see some facts and some direct statements of what happened before I make a judgment.”

Who said law enforcement officers are better trained than the public?  I know the officer probably needs his/her paycheck, but I think my response would have been something akin to “Are you SERIOUS?”, and if the response were in the affirmative, QUIT ON THE SPOT!
Should there have been an ‘accident’, I’m certain the officer in question would have used the defense “I was just following orders!” – a defense we’ve heard before, somewhere.
For The Four Rules in question, please refer to the blog sidebar…

Harris Publications

Gun Annual 2015

Blogmother™ Tamara tells us of the following…

Harris Publications is Gone With the Wind

Newsstands were places that sold things like paper websites but with no comments section. Ask your parents, kids. http://www.gunsholstersandgear.com/2016/04/28/harris-publications-closing/ 

Bigger story can be found here.

(in part from her Folio link…)

In one fell swoop, magazine media’s ongoing digital disruption claims another victim.

New York-based enthusiast publisher Harris Publications notified employees today that the company is shutting down, effective immediately, after nearly four decades.

Founded in 1977, Harris published a wide variety of special interest magazines over the years, including newsstand mainstays SLAM, Guitar World, XXL, King, Revolver, and Woman. At the time of its closure, the company’s portfolio included Naturally, Danny Seo; Great Backyards; Celebrity Hairstyles; Juicy; Rides; Who’s Who in Baseball; and Guns & Weapons, among several others. (…)

And many other periodicals also gun-related, some memorable.

(including Guns & Weapons, Combat Handguns, Tactical Weapons, Ballistic, Special Weapons, and the various annuals)

The ever-encroaching digitally-enforced death of tree-based media marches on.

I LOVE books.  I’ve stopped buying them, largely due to price and space considerations.  The same may be said of magazines.  I receive American Rifleman as a benefit of being an NRA Life Member.  I stopped getting Shotgun News some years back, again due to cost and space considerations.  I’d subscribed to it for over eleven years.

This might change, if I had a better income – but I doubt it.  I would need a significant increase to change my living conditions and with it my available space.

I DO have Kindle on my smartphone, but haven’t used it much, yet.

And many of Harris Publications magazines (many half slick, half pulp) were either too generic or too specific for my interest.

I was oft reminded of the National Lampoon magazine cover Guns And Sandwiches!  :-)

Is Your Caliber Going The Way Of The Buggy Whip?

or even 5.75 mm Velo Dog?

a velo-dog revolver

a velo-dog revolver

When I came of (gun) age, the premier cartridge in my circle was .357 Magnum.  This was because it was what most law enforcement folks carried – revolvers. (early 1970’s)

Of course, .38 Special was utilized for practice, because it was easier on the gun AND the shooter.  And less expensive to shoot.

Semiautomatic pistols were just making their way into law enforcement, with 9 mm Smith & Wesson double actions leading the charge.  Single action autos, like the venerable Colt 1911 in .45 ACP, were thought to be at best finicky and unreliable.

Besides, cops carried revolvers and bad guys carried semis.  This is what was view as TRUTH.

But with the advancements in metallurgy and polymers, different ammunition and projectors were soon to be seen.  Most notably Glock and Beretta, in 9 mm.  And after the infamous FBI Miami shootout, the development of the 10 mm, which was later truncated into the .40 S&W.

Carried in DAO and striker-fired weapons, because it was believed genpop recruits (including some small Asians and women) couldn’t safely handle 10 mm or single-action autos!

Even though the military had been teaching single-action autos in .45 ACP for over 70 years!

Recent developments have shown that .45 is not as efficient as once touted.  And even federal law enforcement has reverted back to 9 mm over the .40.

And I have it on good authority that even (some) Gunsite instructors decided to shoot 9 mm instead of .45 ACP, and use Isosceles over Weaver stance!  Col. Cooper must be spinning in his grave.

Time marches on.  As does technology.

Do you carry the ‘latest’ ammo in the ‘most advanced’ machine?

Or are you an old-school guy like me? :-)

Well, I guess I’ll be moseyin’ down to my buggy, whip and 1911 in hand.

Velo Dog just isn’t big enough for me.

Today’s Lesson: Read The Fine Print

scottWhen I moved in with J. (a good friend and ex-gf ) over three years ago! (Where does the time go?  “Cleveland!” – G. Carlin), she noticed we prefer different brands of TP.

She likes the girly, soft stuff, promoted by cartoon bears.  I prefer coarser grit stuff, like Scott Tissue.  And, when I can afford to, I purchase it in 12-packs (above). (I know, TMI)

And there is a small coupon for points toward something free on the package.  School Supplies, I think.  One of J’s customers is a schoolteacher, and has need for such things.

So J. asked me to collect the coupons for her friend.

And I did, as much of a PITA doing so was (no pun intended)…

After I had collected YEARS of these things, I presented J. with the bundle.  Turns out about HALF had expired!  I hadn’t noticed there was an EXPIRATION DATE on them!  :-(

I failed to read the fine print!

So, here it is Tax Time.  Regular readers know I am loathe to giving the government money, especially taxes! As oft happens, I just file under-the-wire.  I call myself Last Minute Louie.

And for the past couple of years, I’ve been using Tax Act software.  I used to use Turbo Tax, but when my income dropped, I couldn’t afford it!

Tax Act starts sending out reminder emails even before Jan 1, mentioning the sooner you purchase it, the cheaper it is.

Being of modest income (and not wanting to file, anyway) I put off the purchase.  Until I began preparation on Sunday.

And the total was much more than I anticipated!  And I didn’t have the money.  :-(

But, I able to finagle the fee to efile my tax returns MONDAY (two weeks ago).  Last Minute Louie it is!

Lesson learned – from now on I shall read the fine print!

(FTC – in no way is this an endorsement of either or any tax software product)

The American Police State

(from The Ron Paul Institute , in part)

The following activities are guaranteed to get you censored, surveilled, eventually placed on a government watch list, possibly detained and potentially killed.

Laugh at your own peril.

Use harmless trigger words like cloud, pork and pirates: The Department of Homeland Security has an expansive list of keywords and phrases it uses to monitor social networking sites and online media for signs of terrorist or other threats such as SWAT, lockdown, police, cloud, food poisoning, pork, flu, Subway, smart, delays, cancelled, la familia, pirates, hurricane, forest fire, storm, flood, help, ice, snow, worm, warning or social media.

Use a cell phone: Simply by using a cell phone, you make yourself an easy target for government agents—working closely with corporations—who can listen in on your phone calls, read your text messages and emails, and track your movements based on the data transferred from, received by, and stored in your cell phone. Mention any of the so-called “trigger” words in a conversation or text message, and you’ll get flagged for sure.

Drive a car: Unless you’ve got an old junkyard heap without any of the gadgets and gizmos that are so attractive to today’s car buyers (GPS, satellite radio, electrical everything, smart systems, etc.), driving a car today is like wearing a homing device: you’ll be tracked from the moment you open that car door thanks to black box recorders and vehicle-to-vehicle communications systems that can monitor your speed, direction, location, the number of miles traveled, and even your seatbelt use. Once you add satellites, GPS devices, license plate readers, and real-time traffic cameras to the mix, there’s nowhere you can go on our nation’s highways and byways that you can’t be followed.

Attend a political rally: Enacted in the wake of 9/11, the Patriot Act redefined terrorism so broadly that many non-terrorist political activities such as protest marches, demonstrations and civil disobedience were considered potential terrorist acts, thereby rendering anyone desiring to engage in protected First Amendment expressive activities as suspects of the surveillance state.

Express yourself on social media: The FBI, CIA, NSA and other government agencies are investing in and relying on corporate surveillance technologies that can mine constitutionally protected speech on social media platforms such as Facebook, Twitter and Instagram in order to identify potential extremists and predict who might engage in future acts of anti-government behavior.

Serve in the militaryOperation Vigilant Eagle, the brainchild of the Dept. of Homeland Security, calls for surveillance of military veterans returning from Iraq and Afghanistan, characterizing them as extremists and potential domestic terrorist threats because they may be “disgruntled, disillusioned or suffering from the psychological effects of war.”

Disagree with a law enforcement official: A growing number of government programs are aimed at identifying, monitoring and locking up anyone considered potentially “dangerous” or mentally ill (according to government standards, of course). For instance, a homeless man in New York City who reportedly had a history of violence but no signs of mental illness was forcibly detained in a psych ward for a week after arguing with shelter police.

Call in sick to work: In Virginia, a so-called police “welfare check” instigated by a 58-year-old man’s employer after he called in sick resulted in a two-hour, SWAT team-style raid on the man’s truck and a 72-hour mental health hold. All of this was done despite the fact that police acknowledged they had no legal basis nor probable cause for detaining the man, given that he had not threatened to harm anyone and was not mentally ill.

Limp or stutter: As a result of a nationwide push to certify a broad spectrum of government officials in mental health first-aid training (a 12-hour course comprised of PowerPoint presentations, videos, discussions, role playing and other interactive activities), more Americans are going to run the risk of being reported for having mental health issues by non-medical personnel. For instance, one 37-year-old disabled man was arrested, diagnosed by police and an unlicensed mental health screener as having “mental health issues,” apparently because of his slurred speech and unsteady gait.

Appear confused or nervous, fidget, whistle or smell bad: According to the Transportation Security Administration’s 92-point secret behavior watch list for spotting terrorists, these are among some of the telling signs of suspicious behavior: fidgeting, whistling, bad body odor, yawning, clearing your throat, having a pale face from recently shaving your beard, covering your mouth with your hand when speaking and blinking your eyes fast.

Allow yourself to be seen in public waving a toy gun or anything remotely resembling a gun, such as a water nozzle or a remote control or a walking cane, for instance: No longer is it unusual to hear about incidents in which police shoot unarmed individuals first and ask questions later. John Crawford was shot by police in an Ohio Wal-Mart for holding an air rifle sold in the store that he may have intended to buy. Thirteen-year-old Andy Lopez Cruz was shot 7 times in 10 seconds by a California police officer who mistook the boy’s toy gun for an assault rifle. Christopher Roupe, 17, was shot and killed after opening the door to a police officer. The officer, mistaking the Wii remote control in Roupe’s hand for a gun, shot him in the chest. Another police officer repeatedly shot 70-year-old Bobby Canipe during a traffic stop. The cop saw the man reaching for his cane and, believing the cane to be a rifle, opened fire.

Appear to be pro-gun, pro-freedom or anti-government: You might be a domestic terrorist in the eyes of the FBI (and its network of snitches) if you: express libertarian philosophies; exhibit Second Amendment-oriented views; read survivalist literature, including apocalyptic fictional books; show signs of self-sufficiency (stockpiling food, ammo, hand tools, medical supplies); fear an economic collapse; buy gold and barter items; voice fears about Big Brother or big government; or expound about constitutional rights and civil liberties.

Attend a public school: Microcosms of the police state, America’s public schools contain almost every aspect of the militarized, intolerant, senseless, overcriminalized, legalistic, surveillance-riddled, totalitarian landscape that plagues those of us on the “outside.” Additionally, as part of the government’s so-called ongoing war on terror, the FBI—the nation’s de facto secret police force—is now recruiting students and teachers to spy on each other and report anyone who appears to have the potential to be “anti-government” or “extremist” as part of its “Don’t Be a Puppet” campaign.

Speak truth to power: Long before Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden were being castigated for blowing the whistle on the government’s war crimes and the National Security Agency’s abuse of its surveillance powers, it was activists such as Martin Luther King Jr. and John Lennon who were being singled out for daring to speak truth to power. These men and others like them had their phone calls monitored and data files collected on their activities and associations. For a little while, at least, they became enemy number one in the eyes of the US government.

There’s always a price to pay for standing up to the powers-that-be.

Yet as this list shows, you don’t even have to be a dissident to get flagged by the government for surveillance, censorship and detention.

All you really need to be is a citizen of the American police state.

Have we EVER been this ‘Free’ Republic of which many of us often speak?  Or is that just the goal we never reach? And seem to be drifting even further away from?

police state

h/t Bullets, Beans and Bullion

Pinteresting! (Or Not)

I recently ‘joined’ Pinterest, another (self-serving) social media website wherein one chooses topics in which one has an interest (guns, humor, history, watches, pets for example), and pictures, articles, recipes, essays, things-for-sale appear in a hodge-podge of stuff from other members (aka PINS).  One may simply view them, expand them for more in-depth reading and/or comment on them.  PIN them to review later (as more are always being added.)  And, of course, add their own PINS to the group conversation!

The ultimate time waster!

(examples)

Funny Pictures Of The Day – 42 Pics:

Funny Pictures Of The Day – 42 Pics

Gilboa 9mm AR-type submachine gun:

Saved from guns.com  (Gilboa 9mm AR-type submachine gun)

I’m new at this, but this PIN caught my eye:

Product Details

Undercover Bracelet
A useful tool for covert and undercover operators, those that travel abroad in unstable countries, or anyone at risk of being held unlawfully.
A leading federal law enforcement agency asked for a special emergency handcuff key for their undercover operatives.
The Undercover Bracelet is the result.
This unique handcuff key is designed to always be situated at the optimum location for access and deployment – right next to the wrist.
Disguised as a common “gummy bracelet”, this rubbery flexible bracelet won’t draw even a second glance when worn in most environments.
This device is completely non-metallic, even the key portion.
The key, which is permanently affixed to one end of the bracelet, serves as the connector joining the two ends.
The key is not visible when the bracelet is worn.

It is quickly accessed by just yanking on the bracelet, exposing the key.

The bracelet accommodates wrists up to 10″, and can be cut down to fit.

Weight: 0.2 oz.
Patented
Made in USA.
On Amazon – $18.47
On Pinterest – $9.99 !
And joining Pinterest is FREE!
(FTC – neither Pinterest or Amazon gave me anything.  Get you own key!)

Political Correctness @ Arlington

(from Free North Carolina)
confed arlington

The PC police have found a new target.  Not satisfied with monuments and flags, the Maryland general assembly recently voted to alter the lyrics to the official State song, James Ryder Randall’s “Maryland, My Maryland.”  Lincoln apologist Christian McWhirter penned a piece for Time magazine that labeled the song “dissident.”  This is true if using the standard definition of the word, opposition to official policy, especially that of an authoritarian state.  Anti-Hitler Germans were dissidents.

George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Sam Adams, and the rest of the founding generation were dissidents.  Anti-Lenin and anti-Stalin Russians were dissidents.  Demonstrators at Tiananmen Square were dissidents.  It seems dissidents are those usually on the right side of history.  Obviously McWhirter disagrees.

Gee.  Time magazine.  Who knew?

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…

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