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American Heroes

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Political Correctness @ Arlington

(from Free North Carolina)
confed arlington

The PC police have found a new target.  Not satisfied with monuments and flags, the Maryland general assembly recently voted to alter the lyrics to the official State song, James Ryder Randall’s “Maryland, My Maryland.”  Lincoln apologist Christian McWhirter penned a piece for Time magazine that labeled the song “dissident.”  This is true if using the standard definition of the word, opposition to official policy, especially that of an authoritarian state.  Anti-Hitler Germans were dissidents.

George Washington, Thomas Jefferson, Sam Adams, and the rest of the founding generation were dissidents.  Anti-Lenin and anti-Stalin Russians were dissidents.  Demonstrators at Tiananmen Square were dissidents.  It seems dissidents are those usually on the right side of history.  Obviously McWhirter disagrees.

Gee.  Time magazine.  Who knew?

Pioneers, Geniuses And Leeches

Oh, my!

I was reviewing some old posts for inspiration, and a pioneer’s name leapt from the page.  We all are familiar with John Browning, Jeff Cooper and company, but I also remember others, perhaps less lauded…

Mel Tappan

Mel was an early (1970’s) survivalist, who wrote of prepping and related matters.  He, Jeff Cooper and others wrote of such things, when most folks were remembering their family’s bomb shelters of 10 years earlier, and pooh-poohing such concepts.

…He then wrote a monthly column on survival topics titled “Survival Notes” for Guns & Ammo magazine. Shortly before his death, he also wrote a few monthly columns as the Survival Editor for Soldier of Fortune magazine. Through these publications and his 1977 book Survival Gunswhich as of 2010 is still in print after more than 32 years – he became an influential spokesman of the “armed-defense” wing of the Survivalist movement. The back cover of Survival Guns quotes Laura Cunningham of The New York Times as describing Tappan as “The Survivalist voice of reason.” (Wikipedia)

He passed way-too-young at age 47 of heart failure.

Other pioneers and geniuses came to mind.

Jim Cirillo

Jim Cirillo was a noted firearms trainer and former member of the NYPD’s elite Stakeout Unit (often called the “Stakeout Squad”). He died on July 12, 2007 as a result of an automobile accident versus a semi tractor-trailer.

In his five years on the Stakeout Unit, from 1968-1973, he was involved in seventeen gunfights.

In more recent years, he was involved in firearms training for police and civilians, publishing books and videos on the subject through Paladin Press, and teaching classes at a number of private schools.

Cirillo also worked on bullet design, creating bullet noses designed to “dig into” a target rather than deflecting from them.  (Wikibin)

I’m fond of quoting him when the subject of handgun bullet stopping power is raised.  Jim said, “Stopping power begins at 12 gauge.”  With is real-life experience, I’m inclined to believe him.

Bruce Nelson

Bruce was a retired law enforcement officer, one of the top holster makers and leather craftsmen in the country. A renowned firearms and police officer survival instructor, Bruce was one of the founders of the International Practical Shooting Confederation and a well-know author, gun rights activist and community leader. (Tucsoncitizen.com)

Bruce had been a California narcotic’s officer who tired of the cheap leather crap being foisted upon him to use to carry his .45 automatic.  He solved the problem by designing (and later selling) a holster of his own design christened the Summer Special.  Later, he sold the design to Milt Sparks, who has been sellingsummer-special variants of the original design ever since.  Many holster manufacturers have copied it.

Bruce was married to firearms-activist (and later NRA president) Sandra (Sandy) Froman, a pioneer in her own right.

Bruce, too, passed at age 47.

When I originally was forming the idea for this post, I was going to also include people of the leech variety – the names of Karl Marx (who never worked a job a day in his life, and sponged off co-author Friedrich Engels) and Bernie Sanders (whose first paying job was at age 40 – helping folks apply for public assistance) came to mind.

Then, I decided against it.

Doing so would sully the name of such individual rights pioneers

Hell, it’s MY blog…

(FTC – Mel, Jim and Bruce imparted wisdom to me.  No money exchanged hands – except from me for holsters and magazines.  Karl and Bernie?  Not so much…)

The Money Face Kerfluffle

HarrietWell, reportedly it has been decided.

Andrew Jackson – (in the negative)  Indian fighter, racist, slave owner
(in the positive)  competent military leader (the Battle of New Orleans) survived an assassination attempt and beat the would-be assassin with his cane!  As President – NO FEDERAL DEBT, STOPPED THE DEVELOPMENT OF THE NATIONAL BANK!

is being replaced on the Twenty Dollar Bill by

Harriet Tubman – (in the positive) a slave who fought for freedom, used The Underground Railroad, humanitarian, suffragette and Union spy(!)

(in the negative) – ?

Of course, it’s stuff like this which keeps our minds off of ongoing war, terrorism, disease, the upcoming election (with no viable* candidates from either party)

At least that’s their plan.

(or as Iowahawk Twittered, “Founder of the Democratic party replaced by gun-toting Republican”):-)

I remember a similar dust-up when Benjamin Franklin was replaced on the half dollar coin by JFK.  Franklin –  (in the positive) scientist, statesman, philosopher.  (in the negative)  womanizer.  JFK – (in the positive)  charismatic, anti-communist, conservative-for a Democrat.  (in the negative)  drug user, womanizer, in bed with the Mob.

*viable – in my view, taking the Presidential oath seriously, i.e.  “…preserve, protect and defend the Constitution of the United States.”[

h/t Roberta

 

There Is No Joy In Mudville

Associate Supreme Court Justice Scalia has passed away.

R.I.P. Sir!

Having said this (from The Wall Street Journal)…

Justice Antonin Scalia

Associated Press

Supreme Court Justice Antonin Scalia, who died Saturday at the age of 79, will be remembered as one of the court’s most influential, trenchant and controversial voices. Below are a few outtakes from some of the more influential and notable opinions from his storied, 30-year career on the court.

D.C. v. Heller (2008) By a 5-4 vote, the Supreme Court struck down Washington, D.C.’s blanket ban on handguns, ruling for the first time that the Second Amendment confers a right to bear arms in one’s home. Justice Scalia wrote the majority opinion.

There are many reasons that a citizen may prefer a handgun for home defense: It is easier to store in a location that is readily accessible in an emergency; it cannot easily be redirected or wrestled away by an attacker; it is easier to use for those without the upper-body strength to lift and aim a long gun; it can be pointed at a burglar with one hand while the other hand dials the police. Whatever the reason, handguns are the most popular weapon chosen by Americans for self-defense in the home, and a complete prohibition of their use is invalid.

• Kyllo v. U.S. (2001) The court ruled that the government couldn’t use thermal imaging technology to detect a suspected marijuana-growing operation without a warrant. Justice Scalia wrote that the use of sense-enhancing technology not in public use to gain information within the home constituted a search under the Fourth Amendment.

We have said that the Fourth Amendment draws “a firm line at the entrance to the house…That line, we think, must be not only firm but also bright which requires clear specification of those methods of surveillance that require a warrant. While it is certainly possible to conclude from the videotape of the thermal imaging that occurred in this case that no “significant” compromise of the homeowner’s privacy has occurred, we must take the long view, from the original meaning of the Fourth Amendment forward.

• Printz v. U.S. (1997) The court held, 5-4, that a federal law requiring local law enforcement to conduct background checks on gun purchases was unconstitutional. Justice Scalia wrote that the federal government may not compel the states to enact or administer federal programs.

Congress cannot circumvent that prohibition by conscripting the States’ officers directly. The Federal Government may neither issue directives requiring the States to address particular problems, nor command the States’ officers, or those of their political subdivisions, to administer or enforce a federal regulatory program. It matters not whether policymaking is involved, and no case by case weighing of the burdens or benefits is necessary; such commands are fundamentally incompatible with our constitutional system of dual sovereignty.

• Vernonia School District v. Acton (1995) The court ruled 6-3 that public schools could randomly drug test student athletes. Justice Scalia wrote that the privacy interests compromised by giving urine samples under the district’s policy were negligible.

 Just as when the government conducts a search in its capacity as employer (a warrantless search of an absent employee’s desk to obtain an urgently needed file, for example), the relevant question is whether that intrusion upon privacy is one that a reasonable employer might engage in, see O’Connor v. Ortega, 480 U. S. 709 (1987); so also when the government acts as guardian and tutor the relevant question is whether the search is one that a reasonable guardian and tutor might undertake. Given the findings of need made by the District Court, we conclude that in the present case it is.

• RAV v. City of St. Paul (1992) Justice Scalia wrote the majority opinion in which the court struck down St. Paul, Minn.’s crime banning “hate-crime,” for violating the First Amendment’s free-speech guarantee.In so doing, the court tossed aside charges against a group of teenagers that burned a cross in the yard of an African-American family.

The dispositive question in this case, therefore, is whether content discrimination is reasonably necessary to achieve St. Paul’s [p396] compelling interests; it plainly is not. An ordinance not limited to the favored topics, for example, would have precisely the same beneficial effect. In fact, the only interest distinctively served by the content limitation is that of displaying the city council’s special hostility towards the particular biases thus singled out. [n8] That is precisely what the First Amendment forbids. The politicians of St. Paul are entitled to express that hostility — but not through the means of imposing unique limitations upon speakers who (however benightedly) disagree.

* * * *

Let there be no mistake about our belief that burning a cross in someone’s front yard is reprehensible. But St. Paul has sufficient means at its disposal to prevent such behavior without adding the First Amendment to the fire.

The Internet is rife with both praise and derision for this Justice.  I shan’t post the hateful texts here.  There is Great Fear amongst the conservative and libertarian elements of society that without his swing vote, and Constitutionally-measured opinions, that ‘we’ (civil libertarians, gun owners/carriers, and American Society at large) are doomed.  Doomed to the progressive, post-Constitution era of further governmental intrusion on rights, and final loss of the America in which we were raised.

His body wasn’t even cold, when The President announced he would find a suitable replacement, and (some) Republicans suggested The Senate block ANY appointment for the next eleven months (until the next President could be sworn in)!

In other words, politics as usual.

God Save The United States Of America (while I’m still allowed to post this!)

In Remembrance

I wasn’t born for another eleven years when this happened, but as a student of history and an American it gets to me.  Much as the JFK assassination, The Marine Barracks, Khobar Towers, The U.S.S Cole and The Twin Towers attacks did during my life.

Meeting that Navy veteran who had served on the Arizona on Veteran’s Day this year did as well.

Please take a moment of silence today.

Because.

When Veterans Day Became Real

As I’ve aged, I’ve developed more of an appreciation for our military veterans.

I don’t know why, exactly?

Maybe it’s because, with my childhood Life plans having failed, due to my leg disability, I was unable to join the largest, least-exclusive club in the World (Service Veterans).  And I’ve been able to observe, albeit from a distance, the brotherhood, camaraderie and sacrifice imbued in those men and women.

ValorAnd with the addition of the instant news cycle, see some of the physical damage caused to them.

On previous Veterans Days (when I was employed) I made it a point to walk around on break and shake hands of those I knew had served and say “Thank You!”  I know it’s not much, especially for persons my age who returned from Vietnam and were denounced as war criminals and spat-upon.  And the Korean War Vets who were (and are) pretty much largely ignored by the media.

I was accompanying my roommate to another of her doctor’s appointments on November 11 this year, and there was an older guy (my age?) with the jacket and cap, embroidered with his service particulars.  I didn’t see what they were.  I made a point to walk over to him and shake his hand.  It was the very least I could do.

After her appointment, J. wanted to get a bite-to-eat, so we stopped at a restaurant we sometimes frequent. And before our meal arrived, in walked another veteran.  Also with an embroidered cap and patched jacket. Significantly older.  A larger man, with silver hair.  With his wife.

After they were seated and had placed their orders, I got up and walked over to them.  I excused myself, apologized for interrupting, and explained I just wanted to thank him for his service.  He smiled, shook my hand vigorously, and his wife beamed.

Then I saw the identifying patch on his sleeve.

US Patches_0011a

I left hurriedly back to our table, so he wouldn’t see me cry.

Remember The Living

vetToday is Veteran’s Day.

A day set aside to remember those who fought in service to this country. many of whom still remain with us, many still fighting demons, bureaucracies and political enemies.  And those who are not.

The Living Soldiers, Sailors, Airmen, Seamen and Marines.  Some remaining in service; some who left it, but all who have not forsworn their oaths.

As we take time to remember those who have passed in service on Memorial Day, please take a moment today to remember The Living.

Call, visit, and if possible shake the hands of those with us, and say, “Thank you for your service!”

Rob, Lonnie, Glenn, Glenn, Mark, John, Stan, Jim, Jodie, Ardith, John, and Gloria.

THANK YOU!

“People sleep peacefully in their beds at night only because rough men stand ready to do violence on their behalf.”  –  George Orwell

In The News

No, not the story you thought…

(Although my thoughts and prayers are with the dead, wounded and their families and friends in Oregon.)

Brian Terry

Associated Press

A jury has found two men guilty of murder in the killing of a U.S. Border Patrol agent whose death exposed the botched federal operation known as Fast and Furious.

The jury found Jesus Leonel Sanchez-Meza and Ivan Soto-Barraza guilty of all counts. Jurors had begun deliberations Wednesday afternoon, a week after the trial began in federal court in Tucson.

Sanchez-Meza, also known as Lionel Portillo-Meza, and Soto-Barraza were part of a five-man crew that planned on robbing drug smugglers when they encountered Agent Brian Terry and three others on Dec. 14, 2010.

(Reports are they will receive life in prison…)

additionally, from Fox News

The killing led to intense political rhetoric as Republicans sought to hold the Obama administration accountable over the Fast and Furious operation. They conducted a series of inquiries into how the Justice Department allowed guns to end up in the hands of criminals.

Former Attorney General Eric Holder was held in contempt after he refused to divulge documents for a congressional investigation into the matter. Since then, the Justice Department has focused on arresting and trying all suspects involved.

About f’n time!
Now, what about the charges against Holder et al for complicity, conspiracy and obstruction?I’m not holding my breath…

A Not-So-Gentle Reminder

For those not paying attention to the calendar…

sept 11

REMEMBER

And prayers and good thoughts for the victims, first responders and survivors.

And woe be to those who committed and continue to commit such heinous acts!

The World Turned Upside Down, Part Dos…

A report at The Navy Times in July confirmed that one of the Marines shot during the Chattanooga terrorist attack exchanged fire with the terrorist. Navy Lt. Cmdr Timothy White also shot back at the terrorist.

But rather than being celebrated as a hero, Lt. Commander White may be charged for discharging a firearm on federal property.

Allen West reported this week that Lt. Commander Timothy White

This is obscene!  Nothing more needs to be said.
(courtesy of Brock Townsend)
THIS JUST IN – The Navy reports they are NOT going to charge Lt. Commander White!  I wonder if this is a reversal of opinion, or the story was previously misreported?

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…

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