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Honor

Honor.

I don’t pretend to even understand it.

Historical examples include Socrates, who took poison voluntarily; Numerous Samurai, who committed seppuku because they violated The Bushido Code.

It’s not always about suicide, though.

And sadly, the antithetical, so-called ‘honor’ killings…

…..

There are select folks in service to the United States, who have it.  Like this example given us by my friend Old NFO.

As compared to a certain Presidential candidate.

By The Book

Phillip Jennings is an investment banker and entrepreneur, former Marine Corps Captain who flew missions  in Vietnam and, after leaving the Marine Corps, flew for Air America in Laos. He won the Pirate’s Alley Faulkner Society short fiction award in 1998. He has a degree in business administration and is the CEO of Mayfair Capital Partners.  He is the author of two novels and one non-fiction book.

He authored the following article which appeared in the May 26, 2016 edition of USA Today.  It is short and should be required reading for everyone.

Secretary without honor

When I hear people say Clinton emails don’t matter, I remember a young Marine captain who owned up to his career-ruining mistake.

Apologists for Hillary Clinton’s alleged criminal mishandling of classified documents say that it doesn’t matter, that she really did nothing wrong, or nothing significant. But the real question is not so much what she did as how she has responded to being found out.

Once during the mid-1960s when I was on active duty in the Marine Corps, I was the air liaison officer for a battalion of Marines aboard 11 ships in the Mediterranean. As the air officer and a senior captain, I had a rotating responsibility for the nuclear code book, kept in the safe in the operations room of the lead amphibious squadron command ship. I shared that duty with another captain, a squared away young man, liked by all he commanded and the son of a very high-ranking Marine.

On the day our ships were leaving the Mediterranean, we met the new amphibious squadron near Gibraltar and made preparations to transfer security codes and other sensitive material to the incoming Marine battalion. The young captain was on duty and went to the operations office to pick up the code book. He was alone in the office. He removed the code book and placed it on the desk while closing the safe. In a rushed moment, he stepped across the passageway to retrieve something he needed from his quarters. Seconds later, he stepped back into the operations office and found the operations sergeant having just entered, looking down at the code book.

Against all regulations, the code book had been out of the safe and unattended. It mattered not that it was unattended for only seconds, that the ship was 5 miles at sea, or that it was certain no one unauthorized had seen the code. The captain could have explained this to the operations sergeant. He could have told the sergeant that he “would take care of it.” He could have hinted that his high-ranking dad could smooth it over.

But the Marine Corps’ values are honor, courage and commitment. Honor is the bedrock of our character. The young captain could not ask the sergeant to betray his duty to report the infraction, no matter how small. Instead, the captain simply said, “Let’s go see the colonel.”

That captain had wanted to be a Marine officer all of his life. It was the only career he ever wanted. When he reported the incident to the colonel, he knew he was jeopardizing his life’s dream. But he did it.

The results went by the book. The amphibious squadron stood down. Military couriers flew in from NATO. The codes were changed all over Europe. The battalion was a day late in leaving the Mediterranean. The captain, Leonard F. Chapman III, received a letter of reprimand, damaging his career. He stayed in the corps and died in a tragic accident aboard another ship.

I saw some heroic acts in combat in Vietnam, things that made me proud to be an American and a Marine. But that young captain stood for what makes our corps and our country great.

Clinton is the antithesis of that young captain, someone with no honor, little courage and commitment only to her endless ambition. This has nothing to do with gender, party affiliation, ideology or policy. It is a question of character — not just hers, but ours. Electing Clinton would mean abandoning holding people accountable for grievous errors of integrity and responsibility. What we already know about her security infractions should disqualify her for any government position that deals in information critical to mission success, domestic or foreign. But beyond that, her responses to being found out — dismissing its importance, claiming ignorance, blaming others — indict her beyond anything the investigation can reveal. Those elements reveal her character. And the saddest thing is that so many in America seem not to care.

And I cannot understand why people are letting this slide… NONE of the veterans I know are, that’s for sure…

h/t JP

I hold out that someone, somewhere will eventually grok honor…

It does seem as though it is missing from the national character, though…

 

♫ Everything That’s Old Is New Again ♫ Dos…

CLEVELAND: DEMONSTRATORS THROWING URINE FILLED BALLOONS AT POLICE, USING LARGE SQUIRT GUNS

Via Billy

https://i2.wp.com/static.conservativetribune.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/07/protesters-vs-police-in-Cleveland.jpg

This actually shouldn’t really come as a surprise to anyone, as some of the Occupy Wall Street protests of several years ago were known to feature the use of bodily waste in some form or fashion, whether in a balloon thrown at a cop or a big steaming pile on top of a police cruiser.

Furthermore, there was an unconfirmed report just a couple of days ago during the lead up to the convention in Cleveland that law enforcement had discovered and taken possession of a “stockpile” of more than 100 pounds of human waste meant to fill balloons, no doubt for Tuesday’s lovely demonstration of tolerance and civility.

I remember, in a previous lifetime, a discussion with a high-school classmate, regarding the then-not-so-recent unpleasantness at the 1968 Democratic Convention.  You see, he had recently moved from the Chicago area, had participated in those protests, and was an avowed communist.  And the ‘media’ had repeatedly shown abuse of the poor demonstrators by police on the nightly news. (“The whole world’s watching, the whole world’s watching!”)
I’d heard rumors about the demonstrators using similar tactics (baggies filled with excrement and urine) against the police, to incite them to violence.
Of course, these disgusting assaults were not reported in the main stream media…
So, I asked him.  And he said, yes, the tactics were indeed true.
Then he exclaimed “F****** PIGS!”  No regret or apology in the offing.
It’s nice to know that The Left continues to use tried and true techniques, and holds to the same rational mindset, albeit 48 years apart!   *~X( at wits' end

Hey! Rights Ain’t Dead, Yet!

This, courtesy of Wirecutter

For the first time, a federal judge has suppressed evidence obtained without a warrant by U.S. law enforcement using a stingray, a surveillance device that can trick suspects’ cell phones into revealing their locations.

U.S. District Judge William Pauley in Manhattan on Tuesday ruled that defendant Raymond Lambis’ rights were violated when the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration used such a device without a warrant to find his Washington Heights apartment.

The DEA had used a stingray to identify Lambis’ apartment as the most likely location of a cell phone identified during a drug-trafficking probe. Pauley said doing so constituted an unreasonable search.
MORE

stingray

If you are keeping score, that’s the anti-constitutional Statist bastards – 356

Liberty and Freedom – 3

 

NICE

What more can be said regarding the terrorist attack in the South of France?  What do we know?  A Tunisian emigre, armed with one pistol, two fake assault rifles.  And a fake grenade.  And a truck.  Chose to use the 19 ton refrigerated truck as an ‘assault vehicle’.

84 dead, another 202 injured.

And while he didn’t use either the real or fake weaponry, in largely gun-prohibited France, it took the usual solution – a call to the men with guns to stop the terrorist.

ISIS claimed responsibility.

I see two solutions here.  One short term, and a second longer.

  1. Allow the French citizenry to arm themselves.
  2. Severely restrict or cease entirely immigration from Muslim countries.  And deport those already in country who have not been carefully vetted.

AND, promote doing the same in all other nations, including the United States!

Before it is too late.

Of course, this will never happen.  Especially here, where illegal aliens make up as much as 33% of the service industry work force.

I heard on the ‘news’ the other night that one-half of one percent (0.5%) of Islamic folk are estimated to be radicalizedThis translates to one million people World-wide!

Imagine if this were a regular army?

Instead, they are agents-provocateurs (agents of change – outside agitators in the very least)!  Community Organizers?

Saboteurs and terrorists.

Free people need to be able to defend themselves.  Period.

Two folks are sitting adjacent in a jumbo jet, flying over the South of France.
One looks out the window and remarks, “That’s Nice.”  –  Bennett Cerf

(Apologies.  This is GUFFAW in AZ, after all.  Had to lighten the mood.)

National “Security” (In Air Quotes)

© Office of the Inspector General

© Office of the Inspector General

Senator Wyden Puts A Hold On Intelligence Authorization Bill To Block FBI Warrantless Surveillance

from the there-goes-that-wyden-guy-again dept

As we’ve discussed, some surveillance/law enforcement hawks have tried to rush through a law to expand the power of national security letters (NSLs) to paper over the long standing abuse of NSLs, by saying that they can use those documents (which have basically no oversight and don’t require a warrant) to collect a ton of private info, including email info and web browsing histories. The rushed vote on this — stupidly citing the Orlando attacks, despite the fact it would have done nothing to stop that — failed but just barely. Basically, if Senator Dianne Feinstein were able to attend the vote, it likely would have passed. The support for it was one vote shy, and then Sen. Mitch McConnell changed his vote for procedural reasons to be able to bring it back for a quick follow up vote.

Now, as Congress rushes towards that vote, Senator Ron Wyden stepped up today to use his power as a Senator to put a hold on the entire Intelligence Authorization bill. He gave a short floor speech explaining his reasons.

I certainly appreciate the FBI’s interest in obtaining records about potential suspects quickly. But Foreign Intelligence Surveillance Court judges are very capable of reviewing and approving requests for court orders in a timely fashion. And section 102 of the recently-passed USA FREEDOM Act gives the FBI new authority to obtain records immediately in emergency situations, and then seek court review after the fact. I strongly supported the passage of that provision, which I first proposed in 2013. By contrast, I do not believe it is appropriate to give the government broad new surveillance authorities just because FBI officials do not like doing paperwork. If the FBI’s own process for requesting court orders is too slow, then the appropriate solution is bureaucratic reforms, not a major expansion of government surveillance authorities.

The fact of the matter is that ‘electronic communication transaction records’ can reveal a great deal of personal information about individual Americans. If government officials know that an individual routinely emails a mental health professional, or sends texts to a substance abuse support group, or visits a particular dating website, or the website of a particular political group, then the government knows a lot about that individual. Our Founding Fathers rightly argued that such intrusive searches should be approved by independent judges.

It is worth noting that President George W. Bush’s administration reached the same conclusion. In November 2008, the Justice Department’s Office of Legal Counsel advised the FBI that National Security Letters could only be used to obtain certain types of records, and this list did not include electronic communication transaction records. The FBI has unfortunately not adhered to this guidance, and has at times continued to issue National Security Letters for electronic communications records. A number of companies that have received these overly broad National Security Letters have rightly challenged them as improper. Broadening the National Security Letter law to include electronic communication transaction records would be a significant expansion of the FBI’s statutory authority.

And unfortunately, the FBI’s track record with its existing National Security Letter authorities includes a substantial amount of abuse and misuse. These problems have been extensively documented in reports by the Justice Department Inspector General from 2007, 2008, 2010 and 2014. As one of these reports noted, “the FBI [has] used NSLs in violation of applicable statutes, Attorney General guidelines, and internal FBI policies.” No one in the Senate should be surprised by this pattern of abuse and misuse, because this is unfortunately what happens when federal agencies are given broad surveillance powers with no judicial oversight. In my judgment, it would be reckless to expand this particular surveillance authority when the FBI has so frequently failed to use its existing authorities responsibly.

Of course, to some extent, this is little more than show. It’s pretty clear that McConnell has the votes to get this passed, which is why Wyden has now taken the dramatic step of putting a hold on the bill. But the 60 votes here are usually what is necessary to break a hold (which remains a widely used, but informal, Senate rule). So in the end this won’t mean much, but we’ve been here before again and again and again. And by now it should be clear: When Ron Wyden says that the government is abusing laws to spy on Americans, he’s not lying. We shouldn’t then paper over that abuse and give the FBI or the NSA or anyone else greater powers to spy on Americans. Because they use that power and they don’t tend to use it wisely and judiciously.

Can anyone explain, seriously, why the emergency powers that allow the FBI to do the search in an emergency and then get the warrant after are somehow too problematic? Or why the FBI can’t go and get a warrant at all? It’s a petty quick process for them these days. This whole effort seems designed solely to wipe out what little oversight there is of the FBI and its use of national security letters.  (Techdirt.com)

AND, how much coverage of this was out there in the “press” (again, in air quotes)?
More importantly, why doesn’t the American Public care?

Is This The Beginning Of The End?

I’m speaking of this Republic.

With Rome, it was either when the Ottoman Turks took Byzantium (Constantinople) 1453 AD or when a barbarian deposed the last western Roman emperor 476 AD (ancient history About.com)

My Western Civilization professor said it began with (and I’m quoting here) “Moral decadence and pleasures of the flesh!” (to the cheers of the 400 or so horny underclassmen)

What is/was the beginning of the end of this Constitutional Republic we know as The United States?

The Whiskey Rebellion? (1791)

The Civil War? (1861)

Federal income tax (1913)

Direct election of Senators?  (1913)

Establishment of the Federal Reserve?  (1913)

The National Firearms Act (1934)

Or is it an amalgamation of these and many other things, eating away at our Constitutional substance, punctuated by further federal government oversteps such as Ruby Ridge and Waco?  No-knock warrants, followed by airport searches and sobriety checkpoints.  Massive surveillance of our electronic communications.  Prohibitions of Speech seen as ‘politically-incorrect’.  The killing of Blacks by police – whether or not legitimate actions – spun by self-serving propagandists into an ersatz race war?

Now followed by widespread racial civil unrest, punctuated by acts of terrorism against civil authority.

I’m certain all ‘civilizations’, be they primitive neolithic cultures like the American Indian when the White man first laid eyes on him, or the Romans, or the Christian Turks all thought they would endure forever.

And so have most of we Americans.

I guess the true question isn’t what was the tipping point.

It’s what do we do NOW?

dark ages

from a miniseries The Dark Ages

Police Assassination

dpdYes.  That’s exactly what it is.

MURDER as a political act.

Lets’ see…

Murder is illegal.  Murder toward a political end is illegal.  Assault with intent to commit murder is illegal.  Use of firearms by criminals is illegal.  Evading the police after the act is illegal.  Hiding perpetrators and evidence is illegal.  Hindering prosecution is illegal.

Some folks will focus on the motivation of the perpetrators.  Is it a ‘hate crime’?  WHY would the bad guys do such a thing?

As far as I’m concerned, when it comes to motivation, I DON’T CARE!  Hate crime is code for ‘you are not thinking correctly – report to the reeducation camps‘.  I’ll be a truant, thank you.  What I think Is MY business!  An assault remains an assault.  A murder a murder.

Like them or not, The Police are the thin blue line between most communities and anarchy.  Sure most homogenous communities would have some crime with or without the police.  My white-bread college town doesn’t have too much crime.  Under-age drinking; drug use and related offenses.  But what about minority communities with a fractured social structure?  South Chicago, for example?  Where the crime is largely Black-on-Black?

So, where does such criminality to attack police come from?  Certainly from police abuse against minorities, real and imagined,  as propagandized by certain political movements (communists, anarchists, Black power advocates) – politicians and community organizers meeting with their leaders, and making anti-law enforcement statements(!)

And there we have it.  If these ‘reverends’, ‘community organizers*’ and politicians actually stood up for non-violence, peace, and brotherhood.  And facts.  Perhaps acts such as occurred in Dallas would not have happened.

Facts.  That recent shooting where the Black man had a gun.  And a violent criminal record.  Not unlike that Missouri guy.  The tall, athletic guy, with a history of strong-arm-robbery, going for the security guy’s gun.

Do we not think that certain powers won’t utilize Dallas as yet another stepping stone toward abridging the rights of the law-abiding?

Double-secret probation, if you will?  Making it MORE illegal?

Our focus should first be on the good thoughts and prayers for the deceased, injured and their families.  Second, on bringing the perpetrators to justice.

And third, on stopping crime in fractured neighborhoods.  Instead of just letting them fester.

A tall order, I know.

 

*didn’t we used to call them outside agitators?

No Criminal Intent?

So, no indictment will be recommended by the FBI to the DOJ of presumable candidate (former) Secretary of State Hillary Clinton.

This is my shocked face.

face ironic

The FBI Director’s statement regarding ‘no intent’, of course is bogus.  Petraeus had no intent.  The Espionage statute specifically says intent is not required.

The fix is in.

The Clinton Machine, and their ill-gotten millions, remain in force.

And the only other real choice is a populist demagogue.

Be Afraid, America!

Federal Law Title 18 Section 2071

Pay no attention to the federal statute above, or the serial rapist behind the curtain!

All we have left is the Libertarian Party.  And they’ll be lucky to get 1.5% of the popular vote!

americanflag

GUNSWIMMER

Remember GUNWALKER aka Fast & Furious, wherein the U.S. Government facilitated the illegal sale of firearms to have them smuggled across the Mexican border?  The idea was they could then be tracked to the end users and arrests would be made?

And the FUBAR* result, where thousands of Mexicans were murdered, and a number of Americans also, including some federal law enforcement officers?

And the high-ranking BATFE officials played rearrange the deck chairs on the Titanic with the folks involved, lest anyone actually see prison time for such heinous activity?

Remember how this is now old news?

Well, the adventure continues…

One of the guns used in the November 13, 2015 Paris terrorist attacks came from Phoenix, Arizona where the Obama administration allowed criminals to buy thousands of weapons illegally in a deadly and futile “gun-walking” operation known as “Fast and Furious.”
A Report of Investigation (ROI) filed by a case agent in the Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco Firearms and Explosives (ATF) tracked the gun used in the Paris attacks to a Phoenix gun owner who sold it illegally, “off book,” Judicial Watch’s law enforcement sources confirm. Federal agents tracing the firearm also found the Phoenix gun owner to be in possession of an unregistered fully automatic weapon, according to law enforcement officials with firsthand knowledge of the investigation.
It just keeps getting better, doesn’t it?
*FUBAR – for the unfamiliar, Fouled Up Beyond All Recognition (a military epithet).  Some folks substitute another F-word for fouled.
h/t Brock Townsend

 

Just When You Thought It Was Safe To Visit Portland And Grab a Good Steak…

Joel posts THIS!:

Here comes a link from Landlady to further damage my calm…

State Supreme Court Finds Dogs Are “ Sentient Beings,” Not Mere Property, In Landmark Ruling

[T]he court granted legal significance to the dog’s “ sentient ”—his capacity to experience feelings, and pain.“It is really a landmark ruling,” says Attorney Lora Dunn of the Animal Legal Defense Fund—which filed an amicus brief in this case, on behalf of the winning side. “In this specific context, the animal sentience matters.”

Find me an animal, from an earthworm to a gorilla, that can’t feel pain.

“A landmark ruling?” That’s a scary ruling. “Feelings and pain?” By that definition, the rabbits currently infesting my yard and the pork currently warming my stomach are or were sentient.

I recognize that the word has such wide meaning as to be essentially meaningless. But as far as I can tell, the Oregon court just outlawed meat-eating. And for that matter, the ownership of all animals.

PETA (and their fellow four-footed travelers) must be dancing!

In homage to this well-thought-out (sarcasm) decision, I bring you the following, courtesy of Tamara:

a tamara steak

(Now, if I could only afford a good one…😦  )

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…

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