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Glocks

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Sore Loser?

(from TFB, in part)

GLOCK VICE PRESIDENT: “Continue MHS, Don’t Settle for SIG”

– Glock Asks Army to Keep Testing Pistols

Glock isn’t done yet: Despite being passed over by the Army and having their protest of the MHS contract rejected by the GAO, Glock is still hoping for a chance. In a recent interview with Matthew Cox of Military.com, Glock Vice President Josh Dorsey spoke out against the Army’s decision to adopt the SIG Sauer P320 as the new M17 Modular Handgun System. Dorsey’s comments, excerpted below, express dissatisfaction with the Army’s selection process:

“This is not about Glock. This is not about Sig. And it’s not about the U.S. Army,” Dorsey, a retired Marine, told Military.com. “It’s about those that are on the ground, in harm’s way.”

It comes down to “the importance of a pistol, which doesn’t sound like much unless you realize, if you pull a pistol in combat, you are in deep s***.”

“So one of the least important factors as they said in the RFP would be the price; that is what became the most important factor,” Dorsey said.

“So let’s think about that for a minute … you are going to go forward making that decision now without completing the test on the two candidate systems that are in the competitive range? Does that make sense if it’s your son or daughter sitting in that foxhole somewhere?”

I recommend readers click through the link to read the whole thing.

Ultimately, the question of whether SIG Sauer’s P320 handgun will meet Army requirements seems, at the moment, moot. In the face of a 13-year-long procurement process, a suite of already mature competitors, and a $100 million dollar price difference between the bids of the two companies, Glock’s argument for a continuing competition seems thin. There certainly is an argument that Glock’s offering was indeed superior, especially given that Glock was evidently able to satisfy both full-size and compact requirements with a single configuration. However, this must be weighed against the consequence of more time, effort, and money spent to procure a weapon that may not be substantially better than the one already selected. If the Army has made a truly grievous error in procurement, or if there was foul play, then certainly the results of MHS should be re-examined. If, on the other hand, the US Army selected the best deal out of several satisfactory pistol offerings, then re-opening the competition seems unnecessary.

I’ve no dog in this fight.  I’ve never been in the military, but I have paid taxes.  I’ve owned Glocks; I’ve owned Sigs.  I’ve no financial interest in either company.

I like them both, sufficiently.

If it were up to me, we’d still be issuing 1911s…

TFB’s last couple of lines state it best:

If the Army has made a truly grievous error in procurement, or if there was foul play, then certainly the results of MHS should be re-examined. If, on the other hand, the US Army selected the best deal out of several satisfactory pistol offerings, then re-opening the competition seems unnecessary.

Amen!

 

Glock’s Fault, Or Yours?

(from TFB, in part)

Glock

I recently had the opportunity to re-certify my Glock Armorer Certification as it had expired. I highly recommend that anyone who can attend a Glock Armorer course to do so. Those people include:

  • Employee of Glock Dealer/Distributor
  • Glock Shooting Sports Foundation (GSSF) Member
  • Active/Retired Military/Law Enforcement

All the instructors I have encountered or been taught by are thorough, challenge you, and you genuinely leave feeling more confident in your proficiency at manipulating the weapon and all of its 34 individual pieces.

Classroom book learning aside, what I found to be the most interesting conversation of the day was shooting the breeze with our instructor over lunch. Somehow, the topic of customer service issues came up. We talked about macho guys who limp-wrist a G27, and shade-tree gunsmiths who use their Dremel tool too much and ruin guns. The instructor eventually spit out some numbers that might surprise you.

Glock Customer Service Issues

  • 90% – Shooter/User Error
  • 9.9% – Ammunition
  • 0.05% – Maintenance (Or Lack Thereof)
  • 0.05% – Mechanical

***To be fair to Glock corporate, my instructor, and to cover my own behind, these numbers are not written in stone.

Our instructor was simply stating what he observed over many years of serving and working for the company and continually interacting with the customer service department.

It really begs the question though… If your Glock is failing you, can you look in the mirror and objectively ask, what am I doing wrong? Should I maybe not shoot the world’s cheapest, cruddiest ammo?…

Would love to hear your anecdotal evidence in the comments below. Not saying those numbers listed above are perfect, but 99.9% user error and ammo… oofta! That is incredibly reliable and I will feel like an idiot in front of my friends if have an issue with a Glock because it is probably my fault!

I found this of great interest!  In part because I’ve owned and shot (and carried) a number of Glocks (26, 30, 17) and found them to be universally functional and without ‘problems’.  Of course, unlike one of my Blogmothers™ (Tamara), this was done in strings of 50, or 100 rounds in range conditions, with cleaned firearms.

No stress tests for Guffaw’s Glocks!

And, I still prefer walnut and blued (or stainless) steel to polymer.

So much in the firearms world is the result of human error (think negligent discharge!)  Certain, what you feed them, technique and other human factors could be of more importance than mechanical defects?

I expect to hear from those who love Glocks, as well as those who hate them.

Get the party started…

Glock To Army On SIG MHS Contract: Not So Fast

(from Free North Carolina)

Glock is protesting the military’s decision to replace its current sidearm with the relatively new SIG P320-based XM17. The military selected the SIG design to replace the aging Beretta M9 series pistols in service late last year.

The protest, filed with the U.S. Government Accountability Office, needs a response from the U.S. Army Materiel Command by June 5th of 2017.

Until the Army responds to the protest the switch from Beretta pistols to SIG pistols will not move forward. Time will tell if this is a business formality or if it will alter the course of the Army’s hunt for their next sidearm.

More @ Guns America
Last I knew, Glock didn’t have any U.S. production facilities (?)  Kinda a deal breaker if they somehow ultimately win this p***ing contest.
(Of course, how long it would take to establish one? – witness Beretta)
I like Glocks.  I like Sigs.  The general consensus amongst gun folks (based on my tiny, unscientific sample) is that either one would be sufficient.
Time, or rather the DOD, will tell!

Victorian Glock?

The brilliant and beautiful Tamara (one of my ubiquitous Blogmothers ™) has regaled us almost daily with her ‘torture’ tests of various models of Glock pistol and kinds of ammunition.  As well as her opinion regarding gunsmithing modification and after-market parts.

Complete with specific counts regarding misfeeds, faulty ignition, ejection and the like.

And for this (and many other tidbits) we are forever grateful!  🙂

But, it got me to thinking (I know, a dangerous concept…)

Back-in-the-day, when I purchased MY Glocks (models 19,30,26, which sadly, I no longer have.), my intent was to acquire a machine that was sufficient for the task at hand out of the box.  The ONLY modifications I made were installation of tritium night sights (if they didn’t come pre-installed), because that seemed appropriate for a handgun chosen primarily for self-defense.

And the school of thought at the time was something akin to ‘well, you can’t replace the stocks, the sights are okay (now that they glow-in-the-dark)’.  What could I do further?  Perhaps have a NY trigger installed?’  There was not a lot of tweaking even available.

This definitely NOT your great grandfather’s service pistol, the venerable 1911, designed 80 years earlier with 51 (or 53) parts (versus the Glock’s 32).  A precision Victorian pocket watch versus a digital.

But, my friends, it does appear we have turned the corner.  There are now numerous after-market parts for the Glock, and even modification including grinding-upon and remolding the frame!

Seems we just cannot leave well enough alone!

glock mods

Perhaps tinkering is just part of being human?

Plastic Not-So-Fantastic?

Yesterday’s post was about the FBI adopting the Glock 17M.

This showed up in my email today from TFB (The Firearm Blog) in part…

BREAKING: Glock 17M Recalled By Police Department

glock 17m slide

It looks like the new Glock 17M pistols are already experiencing some teething problems with the design changes. There are reports that Indianapolis Metro Police Department has halted issuing the new duty pistol due to problems during dry fire training. The recall comes after the pistols were supposed to be issued on July 31st, but delayed till August 15th due to unknown problems.

The Firearm Blog’s source within the department declined to be named and only spoke on the condition of anonymity about the problems. Our source stated that the slides were falling off during dry fire training due to a potential issue with the recoil spring assembly and/or the slide lock. IMPD has recalled all issued Glock 17Ms to include the one that TFB was leaked photos of due to the problem.

The Firearm Blog’s source within the department declined to be named and only spoke on the condition of anonymity about the problems. Our source stated that the slides were falling off during dry fire training due to a potential issue with the recoil spring assembly and/or the slide lock. IMPD has recalled all issued Glock 17Ms to include the one that TFB was leaked photos of due to the problem.

We have not received any more information about the flawed recoil spring assemblies at this time. TFB called Glock to ask for comment on the recall of the pistols and response at the time of publication. We also called IMPD’s media relations team, they have not returned our request for comment about the recall either.

My initial impression is there is a flaw with the slide lock springs, and the issue should be easily correctable. We shall see what happens in the coming weeks. I hope they identify the issue quickly so that these officers can get their new sidearms.

Phil Note: I recall many years ago our just issued Glock 17’s were recalled. It took about six weeks to get them back in service.

Every new model has bugs, or so we are told.  It’ll be interesting to see how (or if) the federal law enforcement bureaucracy deals with this.

I still want one.  Of course, I still want a few hundred other firearms, too.  😦

Plastic Fantastic?

Rumors abound twixt the Internet regarding the FBI choosing a special Glock 17M as their next duty gun.

unnamed (1)

unnamed (5)

At a glance, we can see that the rumors that the gun will be sporting a magwell appear to be confirmed. There was talk that the Glock mothership in Austria wasn’t too keen on adding a flared magwell for whatever reason. I would love to hear the rationale behind that one. The most interesting thing about the 17M below is that it appears to be a Gen 4. This seems to give the rumor that we will see a Gen 5 around SHOT 2017 more weight. The list below was leaked by an officer attending the Glock 17M/19M training, it appears that he hit the nail on the head.

  • A new tougher finish
  • Changes in the rifling
  • Longer recoil spring assembly
  • Reinforced forward notch for the recoil spring assembly
  • A smoother trigger similar to the G42/43
  • Flared magwell
  • No finger grooved
  • Changes in the safety plunger
  • Ambidextrous slide release
  • Magazines have an extended front lip
  • Magazine well cutout

The caliber aside (going to a 9mm, based on DOD tests), I have an interest.  My first ‘carry gun’ was the FBI issue back in the 80’s – A S&W Model 65 ( aka a stainless 13), bull barrel 3″ .357.  I like gov’t issue model guns.  They have usually been tested, and the belief is they will ‘do the job’.

Of course, this revolver was before the FBI Massacre (1986), after which it was decided semiautomatics were the way to go.

While I still believe plastic has no soul (unlike walnut and steel), I have owned three Glocks (17, 26, and 30) and found them to be adequate machines for the task at hand.

And, as usual, I’ve no funds to acquire ANY new firearms, so, a 17M is just pipe dream…

 

in part from The Firearm Blog

 

Glock 1911 – The Internet Has FACTS

…and many fallacies.

It came across my radar screen recently this never-ending story (and many variants) regarding Gaston Glock & Co. FINALLY making a Glock using JMB’s ubiquitous 1911 design!

About an hour later, having accessed a few different search engines determined that in all likelihood this was a repetition of the original story, going back to at least to 2009…

Complete with high art!

Akin to a Holy Grail, of sorts:

glock 1911

Of course, who knows what the future may bring?  A GLOCK single-action auto, which takes standard 1911 magazines and has replaceable stocks and an external hammer?

Will Gaston choose poorly?

It’s time to ask ourselves what we believe.

Is Your Caliber Going The Way Of The Buggy Whip?

or even 5.75 mm Velo Dog?

a velo-dog revolver

a velo-dog revolver

When I came of (gun) age, the premier cartridge in my circle was .357 Magnum.  This was because it was what most law enforcement folks carried – revolvers. (early 1970’s)

Of course, .38 Special was utilized for practice, because it was easier on the gun AND the shooter.  And less expensive to shoot.

Semiautomatic pistols were just making their way into law enforcement, with 9 mm Smith & Wesson double actions leading the charge.  Single action autos, like the venerable Colt 1911 in .45 ACP, were thought to be at best finicky and unreliable.

Besides, cops carried revolvers and bad guys carried semis.  This is what was view as TRUTH.

But with the advancements in metallurgy and polymers, different ammunition and projectors were soon to be seen.  Most notably Glock and Beretta, in 9 mm.  And after the infamous FBI Miami shootout, the development of the 10 mm, which was later truncated into the .40 S&W.

Carried in DAO and striker-fired weapons, because it was believed genpop recruits (including some small Asians and women) couldn’t safely handle 10 mm or single-action autos!

Even though the military had been teaching single-action autos in .45 ACP for over 70 years!

Recent developments have shown that .45 is not as efficient as once touted.  And even federal law enforcement has reverted back to 9 mm over the .40.

And I have it on good authority that even (some) Gunsite instructors decided to shoot 9 mm instead of .45 ACP, and use Isosceles over Weaver stance!  Col. Cooper must be spinning in his grave.

Time marches on.  As does technology.

Do you carry the ‘latest’ ammo in the ‘most advanced’ machine?

Or are you an old-school guy like me?  🙂

Well, I guess I’ll be moseyin’ down to my buggy, whip and 1911 in hand.

Velo Dog just isn’t big enough for me.

The Perfect Carry Gun?!

Glock-26-920x611Pro2AGuy sent us a photo of what he considers to be the perfect CCW … I took me a bit of time to find that “perfect” CCW, but I settled on the Glock 26. Fierce competition out there in this category to be sure as it seems like vendors can’t keep [Read More…]

So says Steve Johnson of The Firearm Blog

What do you guys think?

Personally, I think this is very much an individual’s choice – akin to choice of toothbrush or underwear.

As far as I’m concerned…

IN THEORY, I’m all for a 5″ 1911, in .45 ACP.  Being a Cooper aficionado, and all…

IN PRACTICE, with AZ weather restricting appropriate concealment clothing, I opt more-often-then-not for the equally-ubiquitous (at least amongst old-school fogeys such as me!) S&W 442 (electroless nickel) in .38 Special.

Front pocket holster, easy-peasy (?)

WHAT DO YOU GUYS THINK?

I like Glocks – I’ve owned 3, a Model 26 (as above), a Model 17, and a Model 30.  I even carried them, on occasion.
But, they are plastic, and have no soul!  🙂

I’m your TUPPERWARE MAN!

A few months after we got married, we were looking for some auxiliary income.  Like most newlyweds, money was in short supply.
This was before the Internet and most things we either couldn’t agree on, or just didn’t seem right.
Then, we looked into Tupperware.
I’ve no idea how it’s sold now, but, back then, it was a party scheme…you got a team leader, she had a number of folks under her direction, and you organized ‘parties’ to go into people’s homes and hawk your wares.
The more people you got to buy, the more money you made.  Maybe you could move up the ladder and have your own team of folks to direct?
The sales folk were called Tupperware Ladies.
My wife and I  decided to do team sales, holding parties.  I became a defacto Tupperware Man!
The good news is it actually added some money to our income – and we’d committed for six months.
The bad news was one just didn’t stop by the sales office to pick up supplies, one was required to attend sales meetings, which were essentially sales pep rallies of former cheerleaders pepped up and singing songs about the product.  To boost sales.
It was nauseating, and a waste of time.  My wife thought so, too.
So, we rode out our six months and quit.
I know more about Tupperware (and women’s casual get-togethers) than I ever wanted.
Things we do for the marriage!  (Of course, I’m not married, anymore.)
The only Tupperware I’ve had since has been the three Glocks.

not like this!

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…