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Glock 1911 – The Internet Has FACTS

…and many fallacies.

It came across my radar screen recently this never-ending story (and many variants) regarding Gaston Glock & Co. FINALLY making a Glock using JMB’s ubiquitous 1911 design!

About an hour later, having accessed a few different search engines determined that in all likelihood this was a repetition of the original story, going back to at least to 2009…

Complete with high art!

Akin to a Holy Grail, of sorts:

glock 1911

Of course, who knows what the future may bring?  A GLOCK single-action auto, which takes standard 1911 magazines and has replaceable stocks and an external hammer?

Will Gaston choose poorly?

It’s time to ask ourselves what we believe.

Is Your Caliber Going The Way Of The Buggy Whip?

or even 5.75 mm Velo Dog?

a velo-dog revolver

a velo-dog revolver

When I came of (gun) age, the premier cartridge in my circle was .357 Magnum.  This was because it was what most law enforcement folks carried – revolvers. (early 1970’s)

Of course, .38 Special was utilized for practice, because it was easier on the gun AND the shooter.  And less expensive to shoot.

Semiautomatic pistols were just making their way into law enforcement, with 9 mm Smith & Wesson double actions leading the charge.  Single action autos, like the venerable Colt 1911 in .45 ACP, were thought to be at best finicky and unreliable.

Besides, cops carried revolvers and bad guys carried semis.  This is what was view as TRUTH.

But with the advancements in metallurgy and polymers, different ammunition and projectors were soon to be seen.  Most notably Glock and Beretta, in 9 mm.  And after the infamous FBI Miami shootout, the development of the 10 mm, which was later truncated into the .40 S&W.

Carried in DAO and striker-fired weapons, because it was believed genpop recruits (including some small Asians and women) couldn’t safely handle 10 mm or single-action autos!

Even though the military had been teaching single-action autos in .45 ACP for over 70 years!

Recent developments have shown that .45 is not as efficient as once touted.  And even federal law enforcement has reverted back to 9 mm over the .40.

And I have it on good authority that even (some) Gunsite instructors decided to shoot 9 mm instead of .45 ACP, and use Isosceles over Weaver stance!  Col. Cooper must be spinning in his grave.

Time marches on.  As does technology.

Do you carry the ‘latest’ ammo in the ‘most advanced’ machine?

Or are you an old-school guy like me? :-)

Well, I guess I’ll be moseyin’ down to my buggy, whip and 1911 in hand.

Velo Dog just isn’t big enough for me.

Pioneers, Geniuses And Leeches

Oh, my!

I was reviewing some old posts for inspiration, and a pioneer’s name leapt from the page.  We all are familiar with John Browning, Jeff Cooper and company, but I also remember others, perhaps less lauded…

Mel Tappan

Mel was an early (1970’s) survivalist, who wrote of prepping and related matters.  He, Jeff Cooper and others wrote of such things, when most folks were remembering their family’s bomb shelters of 10 years earlier, and pooh-poohing such concepts.

…He then wrote a monthly column on survival topics titled “Survival Notes” for Guns & Ammo magazine. Shortly before his death, he also wrote a few monthly columns as the Survival Editor for Soldier of Fortune magazine. Through these publications and his 1977 book Survival Gunswhich as of 2010 is still in print after more than 32 years – he became an influential spokesman of the “armed-defense” wing of the Survivalist movement. The back cover of Survival Guns quotes Laura Cunningham of The New York Times as describing Tappan as “The Survivalist voice of reason.” (Wikipedia)

He passed way-too-young at age 47 of heart failure.

Other pioneers and geniuses came to mind.

Jim Cirillo

Jim Cirillo was a noted firearms trainer and former member of the NYPD’s elite Stakeout Unit (often called the “Stakeout Squad”). He died on July 12, 2007 as a result of an automobile accident versus a semi tractor-trailer.

In his five years on the Stakeout Unit, from 1968-1973, he was involved in seventeen gunfights.

In more recent years, he was involved in firearms training for police and civilians, publishing books and videos on the subject through Paladin Press, and teaching classes at a number of private schools.

Cirillo also worked on bullet design, creating bullet noses designed to “dig into” a target rather than deflecting from them.  (Wikibin)

I’m fond of quoting him when the subject of handgun bullet stopping power is raised.  Jim said, “Stopping power begins at 12 gauge.”  With is real-life experience, I’m inclined to believe him.

Bruce Nelson

Bruce was a retired law enforcement officer, one of the top holster makers and leather craftsmen in the country. A renowned firearms and police officer survival instructor, Bruce was one of the founders of the International Practical Shooting Confederation and a well-know author, gun rights activist and community leader. (Tucsoncitizen.com)

Bruce had been a California narcotic’s officer who tired of the cheap leather crap being foisted upon him to use to carry his .45 automatic.  He solved the problem by designing (and later selling) a holster of his own design christened the Summer Special.  Later, he sold the design to Milt Sparks, who has been sellingsummer-special variants of the original design ever since.  Many holster manufacturers have copied it.

Bruce was married to firearms-activist (and later NRA president) Sandra (Sandy) Froman, a pioneer in her own right.

Bruce, too, passed at age 47.

When I originally was forming the idea for this post, I was going to also include people of the leech variety – the names of Karl Marx (who never worked a job a day in his life, and sponged off co-author Friedrich Engels) and Bernie Sanders (whose first paying job was at age 40 – helping folks apply for public assistance) came to mind.

Then, I decided against it.

Doing so would sully the name of such individual rights pioneers

Hell, it’s MY blog…

(FTC – Mel, Jim and Bruce imparted wisdom to me.  No money exchanged hands – except from me for holsters and magazines.  Karl and Bernie?  Not so much…)

Do It Yourself!

(Within your State and federal guidelines, and laws, of course! – Guffaw)

Shuty 3D Printed Semi-auto is Ready

Via WRSA

WT3EnHil

View post on imgur.com

PLA plastic printed semi Inspired by the Luty designs, is now here.
Too many pics to post here so here are the imgur gallery links.
Final files done yesterday.
Download the files today.
 
 
Of course, the folks who wish to restrict your rights and ban everything are VERY upset by the ever-increasing easiness of this emerging technology.  Those criminals who simply steal other’s firearms will undoubtedly find this method simpler…
MAROONS!

Variety IS Life-Saving

(from Into The Fray – USCCA Blog – Kevin Michalowski)

I know this is the second week in a row I have talked about comments to Into the Fray videos, but I feel it is very important to point out that when it comes to defensive training, there is no ONE single way that people must do anything.
Every situation is dynamic. Every person is different. We are trying to present broad-based information from a variety of sources. What we present here is not THE way, it is A way. If you disagree, please do so politely and logically. We can all learn from each other, share knowledge, and exchange ideas. Nobody knows it all, but the more we share, the safer we will all be.
More Tools?
Yeah, it is a cliché, but every cliché starts with the truth somewhere along the line. If your only tool is a hammer, everything starts to look like a nail. Broaden your firearms knowledge by listening, thinking critically, and exchanging your views. We are all in this together.

https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/ccw-permits-skyrocketing-minnesota/

I’m a big believer in the Bruce Lee modality.  Essentially, kata, like standing still and punching paper, is not a survival skill unto itself.  Sifu Lee called kata ‘vertical death’.  So is doing the same thing, the same way.  If you are under attack, you could lose more than your lunch if you are trying to get into a specific fighting stance.  I’m a big believer in The Weaver Stance.  This doesn’t mean I don’t know how to shoot Isosceles or one-handed or weak handed.

Or while laying on the ground, on my side or my back!  Sights will line up, even if you are upside down!

Being disabled, and having a fused hip, kicking someone in the head is not good for me tactically.  Knees are better, as are sticky and trapping hands – close quarter work.  Rapidly ‘going prone’ is also probably not an option for me.  Neither is sprinting 50 yards to find cover.  Ambling sometimes presents a challenge.

Use the tools and skills available to you, specifically!  Change it up, as necessary.

No More CLP?

(From The Firearms Blog)

clp

The US Army’s Armament Research, Development, and Engineering Center (ARDEC) has developed an integral surface treatment for infantry small arms that could augment or supplant the existing applicated Cleaning, Lubricating, Preserving (CLP) lubricant on small arms components. The new lubricant is applied during the manufacturing of small arms and promises a permanent solution for weapons lubrication and environmental resistance. From Army.mil:
PICATINNY ARSENAL, N.J. — Although weapon maintenance may seem tedious to the unencumbered civilian, Picatinny Arsenal engineers know a clean weapon could save the warfighter’s life.
That’s why they are developing an advanced surface treatment for armament components that not only mitigates weapon maintenance but also provides increased reliability and durability.
Currently, when cleaning a weapon, warfighters use a conventional wet lubricant known as CLP (cleaner, lubricant, and preservative) that is continuously reapplied.

As early as 2003, the Army was experiencing problems with weapon stoppages in sand and dust environments if proper lubrication procedures and cleaning methods were not followed.
Army engineers recognized the importance of weapon maintenance in these extreme environments.
Thus, they set out to identify a materiel solution, which resulted in a Durable Solid Lubricant.
“The new technology eliminates CLP and uses a dry surface treatment known as durable solid lubricant, or DSL, that is applied during armament component manufacturing,” said Adam Foltz, an experimental engineer at the U.S. Armament Research, Development and Engineering Center, or ARDEC.
“So far the DSL has been applied to small and medium caliber weapons, such as rifles, like the M4A1 Carbine, and machine guns like the M240 to demonstrate the technology capability,” Foltz continued.
As a result of using the durable solid lubricant, weapons function properly, require less maintenance, and the war-fighter has more peace of mind regarding possible weapon malfunctions.

The DSL solution achieves three ideal outputs: a lower friction coefficient, better wear resistance, and improved corrosion protection. “Friction coefficient” describes how a weapon slides; a low coefficient means the weapon slides easily, a high coefficient suggests sliding resistance.
“With typical wet lubricants, Soldiers need to reapply in order for the weapon system to function properly. Soldiers also have to regularly clean off carbon residue that builds up from firing and it can be tough to clean,” explained Foltz.
“Our DSL has a high wear resistance and a low friction coefficient, so it’s easy to clean off anything that builds up. You can use a steel brush to knock off any residue, and you don’t even have to worry about reapplying anything.”
Additionally, the current industry standards for preventing corrosion on armament components involves treating steel parts with phosphate and oil while aluminum parts are anodized (coated with an oxide layer.)
DSL uses a benign material that eliminates the need for a phosphate/oil coating process, making it an environmentally friendly solution.

In the ambient environment, the project team shot 15,000 rounds per weapon. The baseline weapons with the CLP showed wear and complete loss of the phosphate on approximately 75 percent of the bolt carrier sliding surfaces and 90 percent of the bolt.
Meanwhile, the DSL material showed less than 5 percent wear on both the bolt carrier and bolt.
In every instance, the DSL material showed either an improved or an equivalent performance to the CLP baseline. Results demonstrated increased wear resistance, increased reliability, and improved maintainability.
While a lubricating surface treatment would be a major advance for small arms technology, cutting down on time-consuming routine maintenance, history shows that a cautious approach is best. DSL, if it proves successful, should be applied to firearms that then still receive routine CLP applications, further improving a rifle’s functionality and ensuring no reduction in function. During Vietnam, the new M16 rifle with its aluminum receiver and direct impingement gas system was advertised as “self-cleaning by Colt, and the US Army failed to issue the weapons with requisite cleaning kits. As a result, the weapons – to a degree “self-cleaning”, but by no means impervious to the humidity of Southeast Asia – failed in combat, which resulted in the deaths of many riflemen. Colt’s claims about the M16 were not false, but the treatment of the M16’s advancements in corrosion resistance and environmental resilience were taken as a panacea to all maintenance worries, with fatal results.
With that warning out of the way, DSL appears to be a very promising innovation that could not only save time, but lives… But I wouldn’t sound the deathknell of CLP just yet.

Yet ANOTHER concoction in the ubiquitous battle of the lubes!

Any takers?  Believers?  Users?

As for me, I no longer own any rifles.  :-(  When I did, I was a loyal CLP user.

But you know I tend to be old-school!

Attention Arizonans!

Mental Illness = No Gun(?)

Not necessarily. :-)

From Claire:

Despite using annoying “gun violence” language, this CNN article brings the good news that mental health professionals aren’t likely to sit still for Obama administration attempts to label every mentally ill person as too dangerous to own a firearm. With statistics, even!

I know there is a meme out there wherein the gummint is actively pursuing all avenues to make firearms ownership difficult, complex, and ne’er impossible.

I believe this to be true.

However (see above).

Going Back – In – Time

I remember a time, when, rightly or wrongly, the good guys carried revolvers, and the bad guys carried semiautomatics.

The meme was semis were finicky, and revolvers worked every time.  Reloading speed was not a big consideration.

And the .357 was KING!

Time marched on, as it is want to do, and semis became more reliable, and the Miami FBI shootout occurred, and the good guys began looking into semis an an option.

And there was the development of 10mm, and .40 S&W, and the invention of Glock and her offspring.

And the meme changed.

Now, today, as shown at this years S.H.O.T. Show, a bit of a reversal.

The Kimber K6

The Kimber K6

kimber-k6s-cylinder-1-768x544

A stainless steel six-shot snubbie, in .357 Magnum(!) with no MIM parts!  Made in the U.S.A.  And weighing the same as the venerable S&W 640.

It appears the meme has been tweaked by the increase in civilian CCW folks!

Who could have guessed?

FTC – I’ve not owned or shot this revolver, nor has Kimber given me anything.

h/t Mad Ogre

Will Wonders Never Cease?

(Courtesy of David Hardy)

NPR story on black Americans and guns

Right here. A short presentation on “All Things Considered,” but a good one, and fair.
Considering the leftist history of NPR, I’m surprised this slipped by the editors.  Regardless, good for all rights-loving people everywhere!

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…

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