archives

gunnies

This category contains 79 posts

TFB EXCLUSIVE: NFA Process Modernized For Fast Approvals

(from The Firearm Blog)

Without rule changes, regulation amendments, politicians or legislation, a partnership between the U.S. government and a small private industry group has dramatically changed the process in which National Firearms Act (NFA) controlled items are transferred between individuals and entities. There is now a system in place within the BATFE’s NFA DIvision, that will allow nearly everyone who files a Form 4 to transfer controlled items, such as silencers, a genuine chance at receiving approved forms in a few short months. Alongside the ATF, three silencer industry stalwarts spearheaded the best modernization of the registry in 83 years: Dead Air Armament, GEMTECH and Silencer Shop.

The goal is to have wait times down to a fraction of current levels.

click above for the full article!

Who knew a government bureaucracy, responsible for controlling and monitoring Title II Class III weaponry would cooperate with both citizens and private corporations to lessen some of the governmental nonsense!?

(I suspect these changes weren’t authorized by the previous administration! – Guffaw  😛  )

(and now for something completely different! – with apologies to Monty Python for using this intro.)

A Judy Update

Judy came through her shoulder surgery yesterday with flying colors.  The next test is navigating today, with the local nerve block wearing off!  She does have pain meds, and the ice jacket (obtained last time through your generosity and kindness!)  Thanks again for your kind remarks emails, good thoughts and prayers! – Guffaw

Just To Make You Feel Better…

about that whole ‘missing the broad side of a barn’ thing!  😛

(from TFB)

Canadian Sniper Sets New Confirmed Kill Record at 2.2 Miles

Crushing a record previously held by a British sniper, a Canadian special forces member now holds the title title for the longest confirmed kill. Measured at 3,450 meters, or approximately 2.2 miles, the member of the Joint Task Force 2 killed an Islamic State insurgent in Iraq using a McMillan TAC-50 rifle. For obvious reasons, officials are not releasing the name of the soldier, but say that the shot was “confirmed by video and other data”. Now that’s a LiveLeak video I want to see,

2.2 Miles confirmed kill

Canadian elite special forces sniper sets record-breaking

Confirmed kill shot in Iraq

A sniper with Canada’s elite special forces in Iraq has shattered the world record for the longest confirmed kill shot in military history at a staggering distance of 3,450 metres.

Sources say a member of Joint Task Force 2 killed an Islamic State insurgent with a McMillan TAC-50 sniper rifle while firing from a high-rise during an operation that took place within the last month in Iraq. It took under 10 seconds to hit the target.

“The shot in question actually disrupted a Daesh [Islamic State] attack on Iraqi security forces,” said a military source, who stressed the operation fell within the strictures of the government’s advise and assist mission. “Instead of dropping a bomb that could potentially kill civilians in the area, it is a very precise application of force and because it was so far way, the bad guys didn’t have a clue what was happening.”

A sniper with Canada’s elite special forces in Iraq has shattered the world record for the longest confirmed kill shot in military history at a staggering distance of 3,450 metres.

Sources say a member of Joint Task Force 2 killed an Islamic State insurgent with a McMillan TAC-50 sniper rifle while firing from a high-rise during an operation that took place within the last month in Iraq. It took under 10 seconds to hit the target.

“The shot in question actually disrupted a Daesh [Islamic State] attack on Iraqi security forces,” said a military source, who stressed the operation fell within the strictures of the government’s advise and assist mission. “Instead of dropping a bomb that could potentially kill civilians in the area, it is a very precise application of force and because it was so far way, the bad guys didn’t have a clue what was happening.”

The kill was independently verified by video camera and other data, The Globe and Mail has learned.

“Hard data on this. It isn’t an opinion. It isn’t an approximation. There is a second location with eyes on with all the right equipment to capture exactly what the shot was,” another military source said.

A military insider told The Globe: “This is an incredible feat. It is a world record that might never be equaled.”

The world record was previously held by British sniper Craig Harrison, who shot a Taliban gunner with a 338 Lapua Magnum rifle from 2,475 metres away in 2009.

Previously, Canadian Corporal Rob Furlong had set the world record in 2002 at 2,430 metres when he gunned down an Afghan insurgent carrying an RPK machine gun during Operation Anaconda.

Weeks before, Canadian Master Cpl. Arron Perry briefly held the world’s best sniper record after he fatally shot an insurgent at 2,310 metres during the same operation. Both soldiers were members of the 3rd Battalion Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry.

JTF2 special forces are primarily tasked with counterterrorism, sniper operations and hostage rescue. Much of the information about this elite organization is classified and not commented on by the government. The unit’s snipers and members of Canadian Special Operations Regiment, who are carrying out the main task of training Kurdish forces, have been operating in tough conditions in Iraq.

The Trudeau government pulled CF-18 fighter jets out of Iraq in 2016 but expanded the military mission, which will see the number of Canadian special forces trainers climb to 207 from 69 in an assist, train and advise mission. Canadian commandos are not supposed to be involved in direct combat, but are authorized to go up to the front lines on training missions with Kurdish Peshmerga fighters and to paint targets for coalition air strikes.

For operational security reasons, sources would not reveal the names of the elite Canadian sniper and his partner, nor the location where the action took place.

A sniper and his observer partner are often sent to remote and dangerous locations to hunt down insurgents while having to carry heavy equipment. Once they have located the target, snipers follow the same methodical approach before each shot. Breathe in, out, in, out, find a natural pause and then squeeze the trigger.

Canada has a reputation among Western military forces for the quality of its snipers, despite the small size of the Canadian Armed Forces compared to the United States and Britain.

“Canada has a world-class sniper system. It is not just a sniper. They work in pairs. There is an observer,” a military source said. “This is a skill set that only a very few people have.”

The skill of the JTF2 sniper in taking down an insurgent at 3,450 metres required math skills, great eyesight, precision of ammunition and firearms, and superb training.

“It is at the distance where you have to account not just for the ballistics of the round, which change over time and distance, you have to adjust for wind, and the wind would be swirling,” said a source with expertise in training Canadian special forces.

“You have to adjust for him firing from a higher location downward and as the round drops you have to account for that. And from that distance you actually have to account for the curvature of the Earth.”

U.S. Sergeant Bryan Kremer has the longest confirmed sniper kill shot by a U.S. soldier. He killed an Iraqi insurgent with his Barrett M82A1 rifle at 2,300 metres in 2004.

Story and graphic credit: The Globe And Mail

Traditionally, I give the Canucks a lot of grief in GiA.

However, on this one, I salute them.

Press Check, Much?

(from TFB, in part)

Rebuttal: “The Folly of the‘Press Check’”

Browsing through the interwebs as we writers do, I came across an interesting proposition from one Mr. Jeff Gonzales that the “press check” is not appropriate for …”when you strap a firearm onto your body (unless the instructor specifically asks you to use an unloaded pistol or rifle).”

I disagree. I’m no Navy SEAL like Mr. Gonzales, but this assertion fails my logical tests.

Unlike rifles where it is easy in an administrative situation to see the double-stack magazine change sides, most handguns are single-feed weapons and as such, it is near impossible to tell that the weapon is loaded without one of two things – a loaded chamber indicator (this is why I like them) or a press check. Press checks are ideal for administrative times – exactly when you are strapping a firearm to one’s body. In fact, administrative handling is the one time you should be handling a firearm unless drawing to fire or de-gun.

Should one press check in the middle of combat? I would assert the situation dictates it – but it’s likely a hard no in almost all circumstances. But, in an admin function why would one not want to verify their readiness? More on this below.

Mr. Gonzales continues:

 “Why do students want to perform a weapons check? Because we as instructors have failed. We’ve failed to encourage and empower students to understand the importance of readiness.”

Now, I will say that Mr. Gonzales is quite right on his points on willingness, attitude, and readiness, but readiness includes having the weapon ready to perform and if one does not have a loaded chamber indicator – the only way to do that is to press check the gun.

We want to perform a weapons check because we are learned and empowered to actually understand that malfunctions happen. I am checking to make sure that the most critical shot – my first one – has the highest chances of success.

I instruct my students on the importance of handling themselves responsibly with loaded firearms as soon as they can handle their gun safely.

There is nothing worse than drawing your firearm, aiming it at your attacker and hearing a click. To reduce the odds of that happening, start as you mean to finish.

There is absolutely no logical argument here. How is a press check not handling oneself responsibly so long as the firearms safety rules are followed? Then, to imply that BECAUSE one did the press check that they are going to draw a dead trigger is nuts. Do it right – ensure your weapon is in battery and in fact one of the key points of the earlier argument of readiness.

If you feel the need to press check your firearm, you need to ask yourself why. And do whatever it takes to be confident in yourself and your gun’s condition. So that you’re as ready as you can be to fight. And win.

This is a flat-out oxymoron. How can one assert that one should do “whatever it takes to be confident” yet throw out one of the processes that makes one confident?

I press check my guns to ensure that I am ready to win – either combat or competition. Press checking is simple and follows an old maxim: “trust, but verify.”

I choose to verify.

Personally, I have only press-checked at the range, prior to dry practice, or prior to starting a string in competition.  Those few times where the possibility of actual combat have occurred (as with entering a previously locked building as a security guard, or my own home on a couple of occasions after finding the door ajar (yes, I know, I teach retreat to a safe location and call the PD, too!) I was too focused on clearing the area rather than checking to see if the pistol that was a moment prior in my holster was properly chambered!

Taking such action seems to me to be unnecessary, and possibly dangerous.

I guess I agree with the Seal.

YRMV

 

Bob Owens R.I.P.

We (both the firearms rights community and humanity) have lost yet another.

Bob Owens.

I knew him through the Internet and other bloggers.  He was both personable and knowledgeable.

BearingArms.com reports that Owens was “a graduate of roughly 400 hours of professional firearms training classes, including square range and force-on force work with handguns and carbines.”

The site added that he was “a past volunteer instructor with Project Appleseed. He most recently received his Vehicle Close Quarters Combat Instructor certification from Centrifuge Training.”

According to Young Conservatives, “Bob was well-respected among conservatives and Second Amendment advocates. He would frequently take on gun control advocates in social media with his classic brand of intelligence and sharp wit, often leaving them in the dust.”

As news of Owens’ death spread on social media, many people expressed sadness. Others hit back at pro gun control supporters who made political statements about Owens’ death.  (Heavy.com)

Of course, there was so much more to Bob than just a couple of dry paragraphs.

From Bob, himself:

About the Author

Written By: Bob

Bob Owens is native of North Carolina who began blogging at the politics-focused Confederate Yankee in November 2004 before transitioning to this site in 2011.

In August of 2013 he has been the editor of Townhall’s Second Amendment web site, BearingArms.com, where he now does most of his writing.

Prior to Bearing Arms, Bob was a contributing writer at Pajamas Media and Shooting Illustrated,

He also does Twitter.

He is currently working on his first novel, The Long Way Home, and has published a short Kindle e-book for people interested in purchasing their first firearm, entitled So You Want to Own a Gun. He is a Rifleman and volunteer instructor in the Appleseed Project, where he shares stories of our history and heritage and teaches rifle marksmanship, but mainly likes to play Line Boss.

He is married to the girl of his dreams, and they have two children.

I was told during an extremely low time in my life that being a father meant suicide was no longer an option.  In spite of this, I’m not judging Bob – who knows what demons resided in his psyche?

Godspeed, Bob – Requiescat in pacem

(PLEASE – If you are distraught, or worse, ask for help!  Everyone, whether they realize it or not, has friends and family who care about them.  Don’t take this path! – Guffaw)

Call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline
1-800-273-8255

Are You Combat Ready?

The Art of Manliness blog is my go-to place for such esoteric knowledge as how to dress, conceal a weapon or wrestle.  IOW, manly things!  🙂

Being mostly disabled since age 12, physical pursuits were largely left behind to childhood.  And now damn near elderly and infirmed, the idea of participating in COMBAT seems laughable.

But, in today’s political climate, with conflicts developing between States and the federal government, who knows?

At least I know how to shoot!

For those of you (like me) who never made it to the U.S. military, AoM offers a taste of what is required for combat readiness.

If social order ever breaks down where this is necessary, I suspect I will be holed-up somewhere making tin foil hats and praying.  Leaving only to forage for stores I cannot make – like fresh water and TP!

For the rest of you…

Are You Combat Ready?(link)

pcpt

 

Don’t Be There! (NSFW)

from Bayou Renaissance Man

Damned if they do, damned if they don’t

Yesterday I wrote about the impossible conundrum facing police.  They’re literally in a no-win situation.  If they enforce and uphold the laws, they’re accused of racism, abuse of authority, and everything else one can imagine.  If they don’t, the law-abiding citizens they’re sworn to protect and serve will pay the price in the anything-goes free-for-all that will result.

A graphic example of how this plays out every day on the streets of some of our rougher neighborhoods was given in Chicago a few days ago.  The video below is profane, graphic and very disturbing.  I can only commend the police involved for not giving in to what must, at times, have been the overwhelming temptation to deal with the interlopers as their conduct deserved.

LANGUAGE ALERT:  Profanity is frequent and very graphic.  If you’d like to read what happened, and watch the video with the sound turned off, you’ll find the details here.

Now ask yourself, dear readers:  if you find yourself on the streets of a city or suburb like that (say, after a traffic accident, while you’re waiting for emergency services to arrive), and you get heckled like that . . . what are you going to do about it?  You probably won’t have sufficient legal justification to open fire on the mob.  If you produce a gun and try to threaten them, their reactions will be just as they are above.  They’ll dare you to use it, knowing that if you do, the law will basically side with them, no matter how provocative and threatening their conduct might have been.  What’s more, some of them will probably have guns too.  If you use yours, they’ll likely shoot back – and your family and anyone else with you will be in the line of fire.  You might be well advised to leave the area as quickly as possible, by any means necessary (including hitching a ride with passing motorists), and abandon your vehicle.  If it gets stripped or stolen, that’s still a lot less trouble than what might happen if you stay with it.

John Farnam’s advice (which we’ve repeated on several occasions in these pages) still holds good.  Bold, underlined text is my emphasis.

The best way to handle any potentially injurious encounter is: Don’t be there. Arrange to be somewhere else. Don’t go to stupid places. Don’t associate with stupid people. Don’t do stupid things. This is the advice I give to all students of defensive firearms. Winning a gunfight, or any other potentially injurious encounter, is financially and emotionally burdensome. The aftermath will become your full-time job for weeks or months afterward, and you will quickly grow weary of writing checks to lawyer(s). It is, of course, better than being dead or suffering a permanently disfiguring or disabling injury, but the “penalty” for successfully fighting for your life is still formidable.

Crowds of any kind, particularly those with an agenda, such as political rallies, demonstrations, picket lines, etc are good examples of “stupid places.” Any crowd with a high collective energy level harbors potential catastrophe. To a lesser degree, bank buildings, hospital emergency rooms, airports, government buildings, and bars (particularly crowded ones) fall into the same category. All should be avoided. When they can’t be avoided, we should make it a practice to spend only the minimum time necessary there and then quickly get out.

“A superior gunman is best defined as one who uses his superior judgment in order to keep himself out of situations that would require the use of his superior skills.”

Words to live by more than ever, in these troubled times.  Kudos to those cops for keeping their cool under very trying circumstances.  I doubt I’d have done as well.

Peter

Obviously, it’s a matter of degree and circumstance.  A couple of kids talking smack to sound tough, or a violent street gang just looking for an excuse – any excuse.  Sometimes, as proposed in the essay, we find ourselves in a bad geographical area.  Wrong turn off the freeway, followed by car trouble…
Massad Ayoob famously stated if you feel the need to carry into a bar, perhaps you need to consider a different watering hole.  Perhaps.  Watering hole choice is usually voluntary.  (I see this as ‘not using the seat belt; not getting into an accident’ thinking.  Just because it’s not a dive bar doesn’t mean bad things won’t happen. – Guffaw)
This all goes back to basics – situational awareness and mindset.  We don’t always have control, and may have to wait for others to act for us to respond – morally and legally.
And THAT’S the hell of it…

Mike, I Salute You! RIP Sir!

ScreenHunter_01-May.-29-08.59

Michael Brian Vanderboegh: July 23, 1952 – August 10, 2016

I didn’t ever meet the man, or here him speak.  But, when I became disabled and began blog surfing, I would occasionally stop by Sipsey Street Irregulars to see what he had to say.

At first, I was a bit shocked by his bluntness.  By the time I had begun my own humble blog eighteen months later, I had joined his ranks, at least philosophically.

I don’t think it was Mike who moved.

Here was a man who stood up for that which many of us believe.  Individual Liberty.  Not only stood up for it, but openly spoke of it.

Often to the confoundment of many controlling statists.

Even is his past few years, while illness ravaged his body.

Mike, I salute you!  RIP Sir!

3% Movement Flag

3% Movement Flag

(More from Ammoland Gun News.)

From my January post:

In his memory, and to assist Rosey:

Paypal to georgemason1776@aol.com*
Check, money order, cash, etc. to Mike Vanderboegh, PO Box 926, Pinson, AL 35126.**
FROM HERE

Thank you for them.

Pioneers, Geniuses And Leeches

Oh, my!

I was reviewing some old posts for inspiration, and a pioneer’s name leapt from the page.  We all are familiar with John Browning, Jeff Cooper and company, but I also remember others, perhaps less lauded…

Mel Tappan

Mel was an early (1970’s) survivalist, who wrote of prepping and related matters.  He, Jeff Cooper and others wrote of such things, when most folks were remembering their family’s bomb shelters of 10 years earlier, and pooh-poohing such concepts.

…He then wrote a monthly column on survival topics titled “Survival Notes” for Guns & Ammo magazine. Shortly before his death, he also wrote a few monthly columns as the Survival Editor for Soldier of Fortune magazine. Through these publications and his 1977 book Survival Gunswhich as of 2010 is still in print after more than 32 years – he became an influential spokesman of the “armed-defense” wing of the Survivalist movement. The back cover of Survival Guns quotes Laura Cunningham of The New York Times as describing Tappan as “The Survivalist voice of reason.” (Wikipedia)

He passed way-too-young at age 47 of heart failure.

Other pioneers and geniuses came to mind.

Jim Cirillo

Jim Cirillo was a noted firearms trainer and former member of the NYPD’s elite Stakeout Unit (often called the “Stakeout Squad”). He died on July 12, 2007 as a result of an automobile accident versus a semi tractor-trailer.

In his five years on the Stakeout Unit, from 1968-1973, he was involved in seventeen gunfights.

In more recent years, he was involved in firearms training for police and civilians, publishing books and videos on the subject through Paladin Press, and teaching classes at a number of private schools.

Cirillo also worked on bullet design, creating bullet noses designed to “dig into” a target rather than deflecting from them.  (Wikibin)

I’m fond of quoting him when the subject of handgun bullet stopping power is raised.  Jim said, “Stopping power begins at 12 gauge.”  With is real-life experience, I’m inclined to believe him.

Bruce Nelson

Bruce was a retired law enforcement officer, one of the top holster makers and leather craftsmen in the country. A renowned firearms and police officer survival instructor, Bruce was one of the founders of the International Practical Shooting Confederation and a well-know author, gun rights activist and community leader. (Tucsoncitizen.com)

Bruce had been a California narcotic’s officer who tired of the cheap leather crap being foisted upon him to use to carry his .45 automatic.  He solved the problem by designing (and later selling) a holster of his own design christened the Summer Special.  Later, he sold the design to Milt Sparks, who has been sellingsummer-special variants of the original design ever since.  Many holster manufacturers have copied it.

Bruce was married to firearms-activist (and later NRA president) Sandra (Sandy) Froman, a pioneer in her own right.

Bruce, too, passed at age 47.

When I originally was forming the idea for this post, I was going to also include people of the leech variety – the names of Karl Marx (who never worked a job a day in his life, and sponged off co-author Friedrich Engels) and Bernie Sanders (whose first paying job was at age 40 – helping folks apply for public assistance) came to mind.

Then, I decided against it.

Doing so would sully the name of such individual rights pioneers

Hell, it’s MY blog…

(FTC – Mel, Jim and Bruce imparted wisdom to me.  No money exchanged hands – except from me for holsters and magazines.  Karl and Bernie?  Not so much…)

Adventures In Bluing

blued gunI’ve always liked fine blued firearms.  Even though my corrosive sweat destroys them when I’m within six feet of one.  🙂

Had a friend years ago who picked up a Colt LW Commander for $125 (This was the 70’s).  The slide was in bad need of refinishing.  He spent hours with steel wool and degreaser, followed by a cheap cold blue.  (Birchwood Casey?)  Never got it to look right, and later traded it for an early S&W model 60.  (Which I later acquired 🙂 then had stolen 😦  )

I spent years touching up my various blued firearm and parts with cold bluing and bluing pens (and scratches on alloy frames with oxide pens!)  Never seemed able to get bluing solution of a quality formula (this was pre-Internet).  I did hear there was one Canadian formula, though.  It was like the Holy Grail of bluing!

Years later, a gunnie friend was helping a neighbor with her recently-deceased husband’s firearms.  He’d a 50’s vintage Colt Python that had developed some rust issues in storage.  We cleaned her up and applied a good cold blue.  It was like color-changing steel magic!  Colt metallurgy was excellent!  (Of course, it probably ruined the value the unadulterated gun would have received.)

My own NM 1911 (The Bob Hall Signature Model) had a blued slide that had been dinged-up and developed some rust and pitting.  The frame was a stainless Vega – no issues there.  I tried cold bluing a number of times, but was never happy with the result.  Eventually, I coughed up significant funds ($200, in 1983?) and had Robbie Barkman work his magic, coating the whole gun in Poly-T and putting NP3 on the internals and mechanicals.

She looks worn on the edges today, but still runs 20K+ rounds later.  All I do is change out the recoil spring every 3K rounds, or so, and keep her lubed with lithium grease.

And nary a rust issue to be seen!  🙂

It’s F****** Everywhere!

That bastard CANCER!

I’ve a number of friends on and off the Internet who have had it.

Some have survived; some not-so-much.  😦

I’ve had it twice.

Earlier this year, my dear friend Bob Hall was taken by it.  Brigid’s brother by the same variety as Bob over a year ago.

We found out last week that Tom Lindsay of Fill Yer Hands is battling it.

Enough already!

My roomie’s ex (who remains a friend of hers and father to their daughter) has had a tumor in his sinuses removed, and a bladder tumor.

We found out yesterday another bladder tumor has appeared, and he is scheduled for yet another surgery!

In keeping with the bizarre tradition around here, many of my friends happen to be named Bob or Dave.  His name is David.

Please keep a good thought for him, and pray, if that’s what you do.

He’s a good guy. and another gunnie.

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…