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Homeland Insecurity

From Wirecutter:

Hundreds of badges, credentials, cell phones and guns belonging to Department of Homeland Security employees have been lost or stolen in recent years — raising serious security concerns about the potential damage these missing items could do in the wrong hands.

Inventory reports, obtained by the news site Complete Colorado and shared with FoxNews.com, show that over 1,300 badges, 165 firearms and 589 cell phones were lost or stolen over the span of 31 months between 2012 and 2015.
MORE

Nothing like having the umbrella agency named for this Republic’s security not-so-secure. Makes one feel all warm, doesn’t it?

I remember back-in-the-day (pre-9/11) reading in Hoover’s FBI, if you lost your creds, you were fired.  Obviously, times have changed.

Going Back – In – Time

I remember a time, when, rightly or wrongly, the good guys carried revolvers, and the bad guys carried semiautomatics.

The meme was semis were finicky, and revolvers worked every time.  Reloading speed was not a big consideration.

And the .357 was KING!

Time marched on, as it is want to do, and semis became more reliable, and the Miami FBI shootout occurred, and the good guys began looking into semis an an option.

And there was the development of 10mm, and .40 S&W, and the invention of Glock and her offspring.

And the meme changed.

Now, today, as shown at this years S.H.O.T. Show, a bit of a reversal.

The Kimber K6

The Kimber K6

kimber-k6s-cylinder-1-768x544

A stainless steel six-shot snubbie, in .357 Magnum(!) with no MIM parts!  Made in the U.S.A.  And weighing the same as the venerable S&W 640.

It appears the meme has been tweaked by the increase in civilian CCW folks!

Who could have guessed?

FTC – I’ve not owned or shot this revolver, nor has Kimber given me anything.

h/t Mad Ogre

How The NSA Is Working To Threaten Your Second Amendment

Food for thought.

 

h/t Survival Frog

The Gun That Won The West?

Hardly.

The gun that really went nowhere.  Regardless, was VERY cool!

From JDZ

Expensive, But Very, Very Cool

, ,

WebleyFosbery

On Gun Broker:

Scarce Webley Fosbery M1901, with matching cylinder and low serial number, that is regimentally marked. SN: 486 Cal .455. Standard military configuration M1901 with 6” barrel having fixed front and rear sight. Top of rib marked “P.WEBLEY & SON. LONDON & BIRMINGHAM”. Left side of frame marked with the Webley logo followed by the caliber “455 CORDITE ONLY.” Above the caliber is the owner/regimental inscription “H.T. MUNN 38th L.V.” Each of the chambers and the right side of the frame is proofed, the serial number appearing on the right side of the frame. Original, checkered wood grips with the left panel having the brass plate “safe” under the safety. Lanyard ring present. Condition: VG-Excellent. Matte blue with oxidative changes on the left side of barrel, cylinder, and release lever suggesting storage on a moist surface. Excellent, near mirror bore with sharp rifling. Perfect manual mechanics. A highly desireable Webley Fosbery with a military provenance that deserves further research.

Starting at only $12,500!

The same model automatic revolver used by that naughty Brigid O’Shaughnessy (Mary Astor) to shoot Sam Spade’s partner Miles Archer (Jerome Cowan) at Burrit Alley, just off Bush Street above the Stockton Tunnel, in “The Maltese Falcon” (1941).

MilesArchershot

An ‘automatic revolver’!

Who knew?

What To Do If You Face An Active Shooter

Questions are coming in about what to do if you face an active shooter. The short answer is slow down. Don’t rush into the action. Remember you are responsible for every round you fire—and if you shoot the wrong person, you will go to jail. Worse yet, you could end up getting shot by another Good Samaritan looking to stop the shooter.

Slow down. Gather information. See and understand the situation before you jump into it.

Move. Shoot. Communicate.

If you don’t know what is going on, keep your finger off the trigger. Observe before you act. Get as much information as you possibly can before you decide to engage.

Excellent advice from Kevin Michalowski @ USCCA !

REMEMBER – The vast majority of us aren’t SpecOps guys, or active law enforcement.  We have no duty to engage.  Speaking for myself, I’m an ‘armchair adventurer’ at best, and a old, crippled one.  And I don’t wear a cape or cowl.

Reinventing The Wheel

Or wheelgun stocks…

Now, there are those who might suggest that a new-fangled revolver stock* is akin to a better buggy whip.  No one uses revolvers, anymore!

Except, many do.

stocksMany have complained for years that the traditional trumpet-shaped revolver stock may be esthetically pleasing, but poor in design execution. After all, as recoil makes the muzzle rise, the revolver rotates up toward the more narrow part of the design.

Hardly designed for gripping the revolver well.

I like both revolvers and semiautomatics.  And I’m a big believer in having choices – the whole marketplace of goods, services and ideas.

SO, if you carry a J-Frame Smith revolver, you might look at this stock* design…

GEAR REVIEW: Ergo Grip for the J-Frame

Into the Fray Episode 92: Ergo Grip for the J-Frame – I don’t believe a gun should “punish” you when you’re shooting it. Sometimes, you have to make adjustments.

| DECEMBER 14, 2015

Looking for a comfortable grip for your small-framed revolver? Ergo Grip might just be the answer. This is a totally new and radical design when it comes to a grip for a revolver, but it is easy to install, inexpensive, and oh-so-comfortable to shoot.

On Target

Replace the grip with just one screw and start shooting in minutes. If you don’t like the standard grip on a small revolver, try this one by Ergo.

*stocks (with apologies to Kevin and Ergo for their use of the word grips) – the wooden, rubber, ivory, plastic, stag (or other material) furniture affixed to the firearm – in this case, a revolver’s grip frame. One grips the grip frame via the stocks.  (per Jeff Cooper)  This is a bugaboo with me, akin to people who say clip when they mean magazine!

FTC:  neither ERGO nor Smith & Wesson gave me anything!

I’m NRA You Hate I Am

(Full Disclosure:  I am an NRA Life Member, and have been for many years, paid for in installments.  I don’t always agree with the organization or her choices, but she is one of the best means available to monitor and respond to statist governmental abuses. With the latest in fascist salvos across our bows, including many political cartoons painting the NRA and gunnies as violent, criminal, knuckle-draggers, I thought it appropriate to respond with humor! – Guffaw)

(As posted by Proud Hillbilly)

With thanks to buzzamonkey for permission to use:

I’m NRA You Hate, I Am
 
—apologies to Herman’s Hermits, and “I’m Henry the Eighth, I Am”
I’m NRA you hate, I am
NRA you hate, I am, I am
I own guns and I want to buy more
You keep asking what I need ‘em for
But thanks to the Second Amendment (Amendment!)
It’s none of your business what I need (Indeed!)
Whether for sport or personal defendment
NRA you hate I a-a-a-a-am
NRA you hate I am
Second verse, same as the first!
A little bit louder, and a little bit worse!

I’m NRA you hate, I am
NRA you hate, I am, I am
I own guns and I want to buy more
You keep asking what I need ‘em for
But thanks to the Second Amendment (Amendment!)
It’s none of your business what I need (Indeed!)
Whether for sport or personal defendment
NRA you hate I a-a-a-a-am
NRA you hate I am

For the younger folks, here’s the tune itself:

It’s A Black Guy With A Gun!

Well, TWO of them, in fact!  One, who was doing the same job as me, the second, our department’s boss.

Being a firearms trainer certified by the NRA and AZ DPS CCW trainers, I always felt that the more people I could train, the better!

Guy #1 was a Big, Black Man.  He’d been a football player in college and a weight lifter.  While he no longer played ball, he continued to lift. Often and well.  We became friends over discussions of political conspiracies.

When I knew him, he’d complain about walking through the mall (our offices were then above a shopping mall) and folks parting like the Red Sea in front of him.  He referred to himself (and others like him) as BBMs – Big, Black Males.  And said BBMs had problems, as people viewed them as Big, Angry, Black Men.

Which he wasn’t.

ANYWAY, we met one day with a couple other (White) guys from work at a local, indoor range for familiarization and fun.  I brought a bunch of guns and ammo (this was when I had such) and spent most of my time instructing versus shooting.  Which was okay.

My BBM friend shot about 20 minutes, then left.  I’d given him rudimentary instruction, but he just wasn’t into it.  It seemed he’d been partying the night before, got home late, and was somewhat hung-over.  He mumbled something about liking to get a Tek-9 and left.

I’m guessing the concussive sounds of gunfire were a bit much for him. :-)

I never did find out if he bought a firearm.

Guy #2 was our boss, in charge of our department.  He was NOT a BBM.  (A SBM – Slight Black Male?) He’d been in the Army, and had some familiarity with firearms.  He lived alone, was smaller, and had a small dog.  I knew little more of his personal life, but if one could label him, he might be metrosexual(?)

And he wanted a handgun for self-protection.  Seems he’d had a few run-ins with Angry, White bigots.

So, Guy#2 and I met for familiarization and lessons, probably 12 sessions, at the same indoor range. After he’d tried a few of my handguns, he settled on purchasing a Glock 26. And became quite accurate @ 15 yards!  And I arranged a deal for him at the gun store where I had worked part time.

Sadly, my pain levels were increasing, particularly when standing.  (This was before I was diagnosed a diabetic.) And I had to beg off giving more lessons.

At least he paid for the ammo and range time!

Race never entered into it (for me, anyway).

I’ve trained Black guys, White guys, women, children…I think one guy was Latino(?)  No Asians as of yet…

EVERYONE should know how to defend themselves, and have the means.

It is our Right.  ALL of ours!

November 24, Seven Years Ago

(a follow-up to the November 8 post I Sometimes HATE Novembers, as promised…)

So, here I was, in my insurance-paid-for-rented-condo, about a mile North of my home, while contractors rebuilt it, after the drunk driver had hit it two weeks prior.  That’s what I get for buying a corner lot, off a street that zig-zags.  Drunks never caught that nuance, head straight for the alley, see the power pole, and crash into my back yard.

It had happened before.  Last time it was just the fence that was destroyed.

Good times…

I, of course, still had to go to work, pay bills, and check the mail at the house, all while surveying the excruciatingly-slow process of rebuilding the rear of my home and replacing the fence.

Thankfully (?) I was beginning to have more health issues (joy, joy) which meant I was missing more work. Which gave me the excuse to stop by and check the mail and the progress of the reconstruction more often.

And, it had been a couple of days since I had last checked the mail, and it was my birthday(!), so I thought I’d check the mail again.  Hell, there might be a birthday check from someone in the mail? :-)

I pull into the driveway.  No contractors present.  This always bothered me, as this process was taking forever. Of course, mine wasn’t their only project.

(This had been a little over two weeks!)

AND THE SIDE DOOR WAS STANDING OPEN ABOUT TWO INCHES!

This alarmed me, as no one was around.  The door had been always locked and the extra key placed in one of those Realtor-access combination locks around the door knob.  Which was now nowhere to be seen!

I exited the car and drew my 1911 pistol.  (Yeah, I know.  All my training (which I had trained others to do many times before) was to leave the area to a relatively safe location and call the police to respond. After all, there may have been multiple armed intruders inside burgling my home!)

BUT, this was MY HOME!  And the training went out the window.  Sigh.

I slowly entered the kitchen, listening intently for any activity inside, pistol at-the-ready.  Then into the living room, bath and two bedrooms.  This was relatively quick, as it was a 740 square-foot house.

It was obvious someone else had been inside.  Someone NOT a contractor.  A home computer, portable television, stereo, some faux Samurai swords and a number of other items were missing.  Movers had taken many of the larger furniture items to put into storage prior to the reconstruction.  But I was told they were unable to take the gun safe, as they were prohibited from storing firearms.

They had removed the Dillon XL 650 reloading press from it’s mount, preparatory to the rebuild.  But had not put it into storage. (I guess it was gun-related).  It was gone.

And the 800 pound, Fort Knox gun safe was missing.  And this was on the floor…

20151106_165708 (1)

Someone obviously had pried off the combination dial and locking lever to open the safe.  And when that failed, THEY TOOK THE ENTIRE 800 POUND SAFE! 

Credit cards, spare checks, school transcripts, cameras, my birth certificate and over fifty firearms! Gone.

First, I called the insurance company, to see if they had perhaps authorized storage of the safe and it’s contents, and had inadvertently broken the locking mechanism somehow in transit.  Then, I called the mover and the police.

And was scolded by the 911 operator, as it was for emergencies only.   How was fifty+ firearms possibly out on the street was not an emergency?

Ultimately, the contractor, the storage guy, my insurance man and the police arrived on the scene.  I recounted my actions upon arriving multiple times for each of them.  And I was livid.  To keep me occupied (and busy and out of the way) the police advised me to make a list of what was in the safe, including all the firearms and serial numbers.

I knew most of their descriptions by heart, but the list (with Polaroids and serial numbers) was not around.  It was probably in the materials previously packed and moved to storage.

Fortunately, I still had many of the receipts and gun boxes, which were labeled on the edge with the numbers.

And set about making the list on a legal pad.

All parties were questioned.  The contractor’s employees all had cellular telephones they were required to keep with them at all times (for GPS tracking purposes).  And all passed the location test.

As if someone couldn’t have left the phone at home off-hours to do a burglary?  Or they told someone else?  Come on!  I never broadcast about the safe in my home, suddenly, after many strangers had seen it, it went missing.

After six months, the house was reconstructed, painted, re-floored (safe drag marks) cleaned (even clothes in the closet dry cleaned!) and restocked with the stored items.  I had called in to stop all my credit cards the same day.

I received a check for the maximum available from my policy.  (Note-to-self:  Make certain all valuables are covered, and if there is a cap it covers all firearms.  I was insured for a maximum of 5K on the firearms, eventually paid just over 7K total.  Firearm valuation of the missing?  Over 21K! in 2009 gun values)

Fortunately, I had taken my favorite 1911 and .38 snub with me to the condo!

And none of the identity items, credit cards or firearms have ever surfaced.

I’m thinking Mexico, and thank God that Fort Knox makes a quality piece of security equipment!  I suspect it’s abandoned in the desert somewhere, still unopened.  (Let this be a lesson – if you’ve not done so already, bolt your safe to the foundation and wall studs – even if it weighs 800 pounds!)

And among the missing are my electroless nickel Colt Gold Cup, 1969 Browning High Power, 4 AR-15s, my Ithaca Deerslayer Police Special 12 gauge, my pre-model 27 Smith & Wesson 5″,  my Sig-Sauer P220 – marked made in W. Germany(!) and my 1942 Springfield Garand!!

I had to use the insurance money for other things, and never was able to replace any of the missing firearms.

HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO ME!

FTC – Fort Knox safes gave me nothing.  I bought it at a gun show.  Leave me alone!

 

1911s – FINALLY!

Courtesy  of The Firearm Blog

Closer Than Ever Before To CMP M1911s

Colt_1911A_.45_866716_L_DSC_33362

The Civilian Marksmanship Program has been providing arms to civilian match shooters and riflemen for over 110 years, but one weapon left off the list of civilian-legal surplus firearms the CMP is allowed to sell to civilian shooters is the venerable 1911 handgun. However, that may soon change. For the past couple of years, variations of the National Defense Authorization Act have been proposed that would change the law establishing the CMP to allow them to sell 1911 handguns to the American public, but so far none of these versions have passed and become law. The most recent version of the NDAA provides for the sale of 1911 handguns (albeit in a different manner than the rifles, i.e. through an FFL) through the organization, and is poised to be signed in the next week. Hognose of WeaponsMan reports:

According to Al Jazeera, which is bent out of shape because the language forbidding the closure of Guantanamo remains, the President will sign the changed National Defense Authorization Act.

The President’s reasons were many and various. The two he most often gave were the use of off-budget “Overseas Contingency Operations” funds to circumvent military spending caps, and the maintenance of spending caps on domestic programs.

The Republican Congressional leadership yielded to the Democrats across the board, discarding the budget sequester principle and going on a spending spree in domestic/welfare spending. Ironically, the OCO money remains, and is increased — but the increase is tapped off for domestic spending also.

The Guantanamo language remains, and more to our point, so does the CMP transfer language.  (We discussed it recently, and explained the many gotchas in the text. The law limits CMP sales to a max of 10,000 firearms a year).

The resultant sale of 1911 handguns to the American public, even at a relatively low rate of 10,000 per year, could open the door for historical handgun competitions, perhaps based on a variant of IPSC or USPSA rules, in the same way that National Rifle matches have been cultivated by the CMP. As Hognose writes in his post, the signing of this bill into law does not mean that 1911 handguns will immediately go up for sale on the CMP website immediately; the pistols will have to be transferred from Army inventory to the Program, first, and the new bill requires the CMP to have an FFL to do this, which was previously not necessary for transfers of rifles from the Army to the Program.

– See more at: http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2015/11/15/closer-than-ever-before-to-cmp-m1911s/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=2015-11-17&utm_campaign=Weekly+Newsletter#sthash.xcAEDNZG.dpuf

Wouldn’t THIS be cool?

Of course, I suspect the current administration to put the kibosh on the idea…

(I do remember a previous barber of mine telling me he bought his 1911 from The Pentagon in 1961, for $17.00!?  Of course, he may have just taken his when he left…)

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…

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