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Loose Rounds In Your Vehicle. Safety Issue?

(from Gun Talk Media)

Just when you think you’ve heard it all, someone points out another way to possibly get hurt with guns and ammunition. Honestly, if someone had suggested this, I’d have said it was virtually impossible.

Except that Joel, in Washington state, had it happen. Like a lot of us, he had loose rounds rattling around in his vehicle. Heck, I probably couldn’t find all the loose rounds in the console, glove box, seat tracks, and who knows where in my truck.

Well a loose round went off in his console. Here’s how he put it.

READ MORE

From a key in a console?  How about keys in one’s pocket!

Let’s be careful out there, people!  A primer is just that, and as such can be set off with ease, and not just with a firing pin or a striker!

Don’t assume.  (Remember Don Brown’s intonation the first day of Criminal Law – “Don’t assume.  It makes one of these out of you and me!” (pointing to the first syllable of ASSume.  Don Brown was Mormon, wouldn’t say the first syllable aloud.  It wasn’t appropriate for the classroom.)  🙂

Loose rounds are a poor idea.  A magazine, speed strip or contained in a proper ammo box is better.

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Press Check, Much?

(from TFB, in part)

Rebuttal: “The Folly of the‘Press Check’”

Browsing through the interwebs as we writers do, I came across an interesting proposition from one Mr. Jeff Gonzales that the “press check” is not appropriate for …”when you strap a firearm onto your body (unless the instructor specifically asks you to use an unloaded pistol or rifle).”

I disagree. I’m no Navy SEAL like Mr. Gonzales, but this assertion fails my logical tests.

Unlike rifles where it is easy in an administrative situation to see the double-stack magazine change sides, most handguns are single-feed weapons and as such, it is near impossible to tell that the weapon is loaded without one of two things – a loaded chamber indicator (this is why I like them) or a press check. Press checks are ideal for administrative times – exactly when you are strapping a firearm to one’s body. In fact, administrative handling is the one time you should be handling a firearm unless drawing to fire or de-gun.

Should one press check in the middle of combat? I would assert the situation dictates it – but it’s likely a hard no in almost all circumstances. But, in an admin function why would one not want to verify their readiness? More on this below.

Mr. Gonzales continues:

 “Why do students want to perform a weapons check? Because we as instructors have failed. We’ve failed to encourage and empower students to understand the importance of readiness.”

Now, I will say that Mr. Gonzales is quite right on his points on willingness, attitude, and readiness, but readiness includes having the weapon ready to perform and if one does not have a loaded chamber indicator – the only way to do that is to press check the gun.

We want to perform a weapons check because we are learned and empowered to actually understand that malfunctions happen. I am checking to make sure that the most critical shot – my first one – has the highest chances of success.

I instruct my students on the importance of handling themselves responsibly with loaded firearms as soon as they can handle their gun safely.

There is nothing worse than drawing your firearm, aiming it at your attacker and hearing a click. To reduce the odds of that happening, start as you mean to finish.

There is absolutely no logical argument here. How is a press check not handling oneself responsibly so long as the firearms safety rules are followed? Then, to imply that BECAUSE one did the press check that they are going to draw a dead trigger is nuts. Do it right – ensure your weapon is in battery and in fact one of the key points of the earlier argument of readiness.

If you feel the need to press check your firearm, you need to ask yourself why. And do whatever it takes to be confident in yourself and your gun’s condition. So that you’re as ready as you can be to fight. And win.

This is a flat-out oxymoron. How can one assert that one should do “whatever it takes to be confident” yet throw out one of the processes that makes one confident?

I press check my guns to ensure that I am ready to win – either combat or competition. Press checking is simple and follows an old maxim: “trust, but verify.”

I choose to verify.

Personally, I have only press-checked at the range, prior to dry practice, or prior to starting a string in competition.  Those few times where the possibility of actual combat have occurred (as with entering a previously locked building as a security guard, or my own home on a couple of occasions after finding the door ajar (yes, I know, I teach retreat to a safe location and call the PD, too!) I was too focused on clearing the area rather than checking to see if the pistol that was a moment prior in my holster was properly chambered!

Taking such action seems to me to be unnecessary, and possibly dangerous.

I guess I agree with the Seal.

YRMV

 

POTD: Watch Your Hands When You Unload And Show Clear

(from TFB)

POTD: Watch Your Hands When You Unload And Show Clear

A shooter was unloading his handgun when this happened. From what Scott relayed to me, was that the shooter cups the ejection port to catch the round to save time from picking it up off the floor. Now to clarify, this was not a malfunction. It was not a FTF and the primer was never struck. What happened was that during the unloading process the shooter’s hand covers the ejection port. The round most likely ejected into the hand but since the hand was so close to the ejection port it got caught between the slide and barrel.

Take a look at the picture below. You can see the primer lacks any hammer mark. However there is a clear crease from the edge of the slide cutting into the headstamp of the casing. If you look at the photo at the very top, you can see the bullet has a vertical line cut into it as well.

By cupping the round as it ejected out and it getting caught on the slide as the slide tried to close, the round went off in the shooter’s hand.

Here is what Scott relayed to me:

The following is a story relayed to me. I do not have first hand knowledge of this, but I do trust the source.

The pictures are of a recovered case and projectile after a shooter attempted to eject a live round during an unloading evolution. The shooter covered the ejection port with his hand and attempted to capture the live round rather than letting it eject freely from the ejection port. The round was trapped, under pressure of the recoil spring, in-between the edge of the ejection port along the edge of the breach face and the front of the ejection port on the right side of the slide.

There is a noticeable linear denting on the nose of the projectile and an obvious strike point on the rear of the case and the primer. The projectile could not escape and the resulting effect was for the case to burst. The pressure from the burning propellent was absorbed by the shooter’s hand. He will not be able to make this mistake again.

It is a sobering lesson for many shooters. No one ever really believes that this could happen to them.

I have seen some people use this technique in USPSA. I have seen people eject the round and catch it in the air as well. Be careful and pay attention. The scenario above could be considered a sheer accident. However if the shooter did not use that ejection method then there is less likely of a chance such an event would have occurred.

h/t Scott B.

I have used this technique on occasion.  Usually not (thankfully).  When it comes to safety, I think being safe is preferable to looking cool.

Interestingly, there is no picture of the shooter’s hand…

When Did THIS Become The Norm?

I don’t drive much, anymore.  Between having a beater car (when my roomie’s car isn’t available – thanks J.!), the cost of maintenance (which I can’t afford) and gas, and the whack-jobs on the road…

Speaking of whack-jobs! (See above)

I understand you don’t want to climb into the back seat of the car in front of you, both for safety reasons and just general courtesy.

BUT IT SEEMS 6 OUT OF 10 CARS KEEP A DISTANCE AT A STOP LIGHT OF GREATER THAN ONE CAR LENGTH!  SOMETIMES MORE THAN TWO!!

Have so many been rear-ended they are paranoid?

It’s just an annoyance if there are only two cars stopped at an intersection.  But if there are 12 cars in three lanes, and 60% of them are ‘keeping their distance’ of more than a car length, it causes back-ups!  Sometimes back to the previous stop light!

And I’ve NEVER seen anyone getting a citation for being stopped too far back – if there even is such a thing?

Personally, I keep a safe distance, usually enough to see the license plate in front of me.  A reasonable distance.

This phenomena seems to have developed over the past ten years.

What happened to cause this?

Bueller?  Bueller?

 

Toy Gun Memories

As it states in the ‘about’ part of the blog, I’m a child of the 50’s.  Television, movies, play, were all about The Lone Ranger, Space Command, Warner Bros. cartoons, Forbidden Planet, The Untouchables, and all other manner of sanitized violence.

And my green, wooden toy box reflected that.

It was filled with cars, trucks, robots, construction equipment, tools, and yes, toy guns.  Including a multitude of cap guns and rifles-that-made-noise, play bullets and all manner of boy’s toys.  Not a doll in sight.

Sadly, when my Dad married my step-mother, the toy box was moved to the exterior of the house.  Wouldn’t want Guffaw’s toys to clutter the house, now would we?  😦

And, as I advanced in grade school, I played with them less.  This meant my Mattel™ Fanner Fifty (with left-handed holster!), Detective Special (both re-loadable with Matty Mattel bullets and ignited with Greenie Stickum Caps), the construction gear, cars, tools, and everything else were subjected to the elements.

And eventually discarded.  😦

(My friend Leigh’s parents did film me in full cowboy regalia once, reenacting some scene from a forgotten cowboy TV show, running, jumping, rolling into prone, drawing and shooting one of my cap guns.  Of course, the 8mm home movie is probably long lost.)  😦

This was when children played outside!

But, boys are nothing but ingenious!  🙂

My friends and I began constructing rubber-band guns, using scraps of wood we ‘found’ at housing construction sites.  (Hey, we had to have guns!)

a less-refined version of this

a less-refined version of this

Affix a spring closepin to one end, stretch a rubber band (or a series of them for greater distance) and viola’!  A toy gun with which we could play cowboy, or soldier, or spy, or whatever.

Of course, we were never happy with the limited distance or inaccuracy.  (Sound familiar?)

As we got into the 5th and 6th Grade, we clamored for more.

So we attached the rubber bands to the wood (ala a slingshot) and began looking for projectiles to shoot!  Obviously, after a few misadventures with pebbles and bent bobbie-pins, we made the universal decision to not shoot one another.

For safety sake.

Of course, escalation lead to model rockets, amateur rockets, BB guns, and eventually real guns.  Always something to shoot.

And, we still don’t shoot each other.

This isn’t South Chicago…

 

How To Spot A Concealed Handgun

The Art of Manliness (a blog to which I sometimes refer) not only addresses etiquette, style and proper behavior, but also delves into ‘manly’ things such as camping, hunting, shooting, unarmed combat and other esoterica.  (Of course, many of these subjects may be of interest to women, as well!) 🙂

A recent guest post was entitled as above.  I’m posting it below, in it’s entirety, not just to entertain and inform, but to show those who do carry behaviors and appearances which may bring to them unwarranted attention.

Enjoy!

How to Spot a Concealed Handgun

By A Manly Guest Contributor on Oct 21, 2016 02:10 pm

The following is an excerpt from 100 Deadly Skills: Survival Edition — The SEAL Operative’s Guide to Surviving in the Wild and Being Prepared for Any Disaster. A follow-up to Clint’s first bestseller — 100 Deadly Skills: The SEAL Operative’s Guide to Eluding Pursuers, Evading Capture, and Surviving Any Dangerous Situation — this new survival edition offers primers on any survival situation imaginable, from wilderness scenarios, to terrorism and kidnappings, to natural disasters.

100-deadly-survival_final

CONOP: Concept of Operations; COA: Course of Action; BLUF: Bottom Line Up Front

Individuals who carry a handgun professionally are well attuned to the range of mannerisms that can indicate the presence of a concealed weapon within their vicinity. Civilians, too, can learn to familiarize themselves with these signs and signals. When combined with suspicious behavior, the suspected presence of a concealed weapon should put bystanders on high alert.

Body Language: People carrying handguns tend to subconsciously telegraph the location of the weapon via their body language. They may reflexively palpate the gun to make sure the weapon is still safely in its holster, subtly re-position the weapon prior to sitting or standing, or shift their weight away from nearby bystanders to avoid accidental contact with or theft of the weapon.

Asymmetry: Another telltale sign is asymmetry in clothing. Guns are heavy and bulky, and thus will betray signs of their presence to anyone who’s paying attention. An outside-the-waistband holster may cause a visible midline bulge, while an ankle holster may cause a bulge or tightening of the fabric at the lower leg. A gun held in a jacket pocket will weight down one side of the jacket unevenly.

Environment: Hot or inclement weather can make concealed weapons easier to spot. Rain, wind, or sweat can reveal the outline of a gun, which will generally be much easier to hide under multiple layers of cold-weather clothing.

Negligence: Weapons are also frequently exposed due to temporary negligence, flashed or inadvertently dropped as a gunman reaches for his wallet. Dropped weapons are an all-too-common scenario at public urinals, where inexperienced perpetrators may thoughtlessly unzip their pants — thereby releasing the tension that was holding up the holster.

The post How to Spot a Concealed Handgun appeared first on The Art of Manliness.

Escaping A Riot

Peter (Bayou Renaissance Man) provided us with a well-thought-out tome regarding the recent (and ongoing) unpleasantness, and what happens if you happen to encounter such activity while driving.

The short version – DON’T BE THERE, KEEP MOVING!

Escaping a riot, redux (link)

Reading about these recent events took me back to my youth.  No, I wasn’t protesting anything.  I was simply trying to drive home.

(an aside – This was before I was an armed individual)

I had spent a pleasant evening with David Mitchell (another Dave-HA!) and was returning across the Tempe bridge when I came upon perhaps 200 people marching (well, walking together) across the bridge.

Against the flow of traffic, and my vehicle!

Not only did I not know WHY they were taking this action.  I DIDN’T CARE!  I simply wanted to return home to get ready for work (I was working graveyard shift at the time.)

But, here they were.  All these folks.  Impeding my progress – as well as the other vehicles headed in my direction.  As this was a small college town, I even recognized some of the protestors (leftists, the usual suspects!)

Were they violent?  (My car doors were locked, of course, as is my custom)  My windows were up, also.

I waded into the crowd in my car, and kept movingSlowly.

They banged with open palms on my windows and doors.  And I kept moving.  Later, I remembered my radio antenna.  It remained unmolested.

Upon my return home, I determined the reason for the ‘march’ was a protest against Nixon’s invasion of Cambodia (at the height of the Vietnam War).  While I may or may not have agreed with the protestors, I still had a job to go to.

I changed into my security guard uniform and went to work.

I think I was lucky.  And was glad I kept moving.

 

Presidential Candidates And Their Health

It makes sense the electorate should be concerned about a candidate’s health.  ANY candidate.  After all, William Henry Harrison caught pneumonia during his inaugural address (two hours, in the snow) and died 30 days later.

We’ve had candidates who drank, smoked, fooled around.  FDR was a polio victim and largely hid it from the general public.  Jack Kennedy had a bad back, Addison’s disease and used speed (in addition to his other pursuits).  Reagan may have had the beginnings of his demise while still in office.

And that guy who dropped out of the race because he had been treated for depression.

Now we have a current candidate.  With many possible health issues.

Hillary Clinton

(from Brock Townsend, in part)

Here are some more interesting facts about her health that the mainstream media ignores:

  • She’s a compulsive liar, which may not just be an issue of repugnant character. Dr. Gina Loudon, a political psychology and behavior expert, spoke to WND.“Robert Reich, M.D., a New York City psychiatrist and expert in psychopathology, says compulsive lying can be associated with dementia or brain injury. Otherwise, compulsive lying can be associated with a range of diagnoses, such as antisocial, borderline and narcissistic personality disorders.”
  • She has intermittently worn Fresnel glasses since her concussion. These glasses correct double vision (often due to a traumatic brain injury.)  The Fresnels reappeared on the campaign trail about the time of the fall pictured above.
  • She is prone to uncontrollable coughing fits when she speaks publicly.
  • She only made it 4 blocks in the Gay Pride parade last June before she was apparently too tired to continue.
  • She has had obvious seizures, on camera, with several occurring over the past few weeks. (You can find the videos here.)
  • She has a medic handler who goes everywhere with her….and it appears that he’s carrying an injector pen of Diazepam. The drug, also known as Valium, can be used to halt seizures.
  • She got confused and completely froze on stage when she spoke in Vegas. As a political veteran, tough questions and angry crowds shouldn’t be overwhelming. Her handler appeared at her side to let her know she was okay and that she should keep talking.

More @ Freedom Outpost

Then there’s THIS:

https://fellowshipofminds.files.wordpress.com/2016/07/hillarys-tongue1.jpg?w=540

Is the hole in Hillary’s tongue from removing a stud, or is it from cancer surgery? According to the blog Lame Cherry:

“the only way one has one of these is that a physician has cut out a huge growth on the tongue, and the only reason one cuts out this huge of a growth on a tongue, is it is cancer.

What kind of cancer?  The Internet is rife with speculation, which I won’t repeat here.

Regardless of her politics, I don’t want someone this ill serving as the President.

h/t Fellowship of the Minds

 

A ‘Top Gun’ ‘Witness’

(Sorry)

kelly mcgillis

years ago

 

FoxNews.com

Kelly McGillis said she plans to apply for a concealed carry gun permit after she was assaulted by an intruder in her North Carolina home Friday, June 17.

The actress, who is best known for playing Charlotte “Charlie” Blackwood in “Top Gun,” recalled the scary incident in a recent Facebook post.

“Upon entering the house I notice a pair of girls pink sandals and a black larger pair,” McGillis wrote. At first, she thought it her daughter might be home and she called out several times for her.

“[But then] a stranger, a woman, came barreling down the hallway and began yelling at me. I asked her who she is and why she was in my house and she said ‘you know why you’ve been stalking me in Twitter.’ Not true.”

The 58-year-old wrote that she keeps guns and ammunition in her home and was concerned one of the intruders had gotten a hold of them.

“That’s when I started to panic” and “ran out the front door and called 911.”

McGillis wrote that the intruder ran after her and “began punching and scratching [me] trying to grab the phone out of my hand. I began screaming as loud as I could hoping someone somewhere might hear me.”

It was a Friday night so not many people were around, McGillis explained. She managed to set off her car alarm since she had her car keys in hand. “More fighting ensued.”

McGillis ran to her truck and drove off. She eventually flagged down another driver who called 911 for her.

The intruder, 38-year-old Laurence Marie Dorn, was arrested by the Henderson County police and charged with second-degree burglary, misdemeanor larceny, misdemeanor stalking, assault and battery and interfering with emergency communication. She is being held on $60,000 bond, according to her arrest report.

McGillis wrote that she was left “scratched and bruised” but is “very thankful it turned out well.”

She added, “But who I feel heartache for is the little girl that was with her. Mental illness takes many hostages. I don’t know her name… but I would like to asked that you pray for her and her mother.”

In a separate post, McGillis shared her plans to protect herself from future invaders.

“I have decided to get a conceal and carry permit. And you can be sure I will be setting the alarm from here on out.

This isn’t the first time McGillis has been the victim of assault; she and her girlfriend at the time were raped in 1982. She has said the experience led her to play the role of attorney Kathryn Murphy in the 1988 film “The Accused,” based on the gang rape of Cheryl Araujo.

O-kay.  She owns guns, but left them in her house, and failed to set the alarm!

Just because you no longer live in L.A. doesn’t mean you are safe.  Hopefully, she gets proper training and her permit and starts setting the alarm from this day forward…

Some folks don’t get second chances.

The NEXT Fig Leaf

I read a while back about a national psychiatric association promoting the idea that pedophilia was just another direction for humanity – that it should be decriminalized and such folks just needed understanding.

Uh-huh.

Well, apparently, this idea has caught on with the Leftist media!  Who knew?

from Free North Carolina

OMG! Salon Publishes Article DEFENDING Pedophiles

There are sex-crimes and there are sex-crimes, all of them are absolutely terrible. But the worst sex crime IMHO is pedophilia, sex with a child.  Taking advantage of a child is an unforgivable crime.

But apparently liberal web-magazine Salon doesn’t think so, they seem to be trying to legitimize the practice.

The post below was written by my colleague Joe Newby and might make you ill (it sure made me ill).

On Tuesday, the ultra-left wing rag Salon published an article defending pedophiles, presenting them as poor, lonely souls who just want someone to love.

There’s only one problem.  The people these individuals want to “love” are children.  And Salon is apparently okay with that.

More @ The Lid
In the early 1970s, the psychiatric community ‘de-mental diseased’ homosexuality, saying it was part of the human condition.  The obvious difference between these two situations is pedophilia enlists demands the participation of children.  This is not about the actions of two consenting adults (regardless one’s opinion about gayness).
I’m libertarian (small L).  What you do or don’t do with your partner in the privacy of your bedchamber, as long as both consent, is no business of mine – nor of the government.
But children need to be protected!  I know both men and women who were abused by pedophiles when they were kids, and have suffered profoundly as adults, as a direct result.
I wonder of part of this wholesale gender confusion is at least in part due to the rampant unreported abuse of children?  
There, I said it.

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…