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That 70’s Show, Now In Colorado?!

You guys know I love my TV and movies.

(I don’t get out much)

And we’ve been binge-watching wherever we can, awaiting the ‘new’ season to rear it’s ugly head.  Netflix and Amazon Prime are our friends!

We recently ran across The Ranch, on Netflix.

Not a great effort, perhaps, but a good one.

Danny Masterson (Hyde from That 70’s Show) and Ashton Kutcher (Kelso, from the same) star.  With the surprising additions of Sam Elliott (for the ladies!) and Debra Winger (in case you wondered what ever happened to her!)

Prodigal son returns to the ranch, after failing at semi-professional football, to be with his younger brother and curmudgeonly father (think Red Foreman), who need help running it.

But haven’t asked…

Winger is divorced from the curmudgeon and runs a local bar – but they still hook up every so often.  After a fight.

Small Colorado Western town hi-jinks ensue.

As it’s on Netflix, there is coarse language and jokes of a sexual nature.  And, for those w/o Netflix, it’s on You Tube!

Not exactly drawing room comedy, or high drama, but kinda fun.

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June Foray RIP

June Foray, the voice of “The Rocky and Bullwinkle Show’s”
Rocky the Flying Squirrel and his nemesis Natasha Fatale
of Boris and Natasha fame in the early 1960s and
a key figure in the animation industry, died Thursday.
She was 99.

Her close friend Dave Nimitz, confirmed her death on Facebook, writing
“With a heavy heart again I want to let you all know that we lost our little
June today at 99 years old.”

Foray was also the voice behind Looney Tunes’ Witch Hazel,
Nell from “Dudley Do-Right,” Granny in the “Tweety and Sylvester”
cartoons and Cindy Lou Who in Chuck Jones’ “How the Grinch Stole Christmas,”
among hundreds of others.

The first lady of voice acting, one of the original members of
animation organization ASIFA-Hollywood and founder of the annual
Annie Awards, was also instrumental in the creation of the Oscars’
animated feature category.

RIP June

h/t Facebook, Variety

The Wire 

As recounted here in previous episodes, I LIKE movies and TV.

Also recounted, I don’t always access current stuff, i.e I didn’t watch Star Trek (TOS) in prime time; the mini-series John Adams until years after the fact.

So it was with The Wire. Dave (the mechanic) recommended it highly.  I don’t think I had HBO when it was first broadcast…

We found ourselves ‘between seasons’ on regular, commercial television.  And had been re-running shows we liked (ranging from Friends to Person-of-Interest) until we started mumbling the dialog under our breath.

Thank God for ‘The Hopper™’!

It was time for something new, to us at least.

And we remembered The Wire

Five years, sixty episodes. Gritty inner city drama about the workings of the police, unions, organized crime and politics.

Sax and violins galore.

With no censor (it was HBO, after all)!

If I had $1 for every time I heard the word M…..F…..

Well, you get the idea.

Well cast and acted. A tight script which kept you guessing.  Some good guys who were bad – some misguided.  Some bad guys trying to be good. Others just evil.

The Internet tells us many of the background cast we actual people from the street.  I’m certain this lowered production costs, but also added to the realism.

I recommend it.  But make certain the children are asleep in their beds.

In another State.

Lest they listen and start repeating M…..F……

Or the ubiquitous ‘N’ word!

Adam West RIP

I was never a fan of Batman, the television series.  Correction, I didn’t understand camp.

(You must understand, I was in junior high, preparing to graduate to high school, and thought myself a serious intellectual.  😛 )

I did remember Adam West from a previous episode of Robert Taylor’s The Detectives, though.  I liked him in that role.

Most persons who become type cast eventually fade away, unless they have amazing talent and staying power.  George Reeves killed himself (or was murdered).  And Baby Boomers will always associate him with the Superman TV series.

Mr. West worked long before he was Batman, and long afterward.  Sometimes as cartoon voice-overs, but not always.  He didn’t just do car shows with the Batmobile.  He embraced the Batman mythos, and made it his.

And, not unlike Patrick Stewart (in American Dad), he made his famous voice even more famous in ‘adult’ cartoons, like Family Guy. (as the Mayor of Quahog).

He passed after a short bout with leukemia.  Having had a blood disease, myself, this definitely got my attention.

He will be missed.

Roger Moore, RIP

Nope.  Not another character actor.

Well, maybe…

But, one from my youth.

I first knew him from Ivanhoe (TV) and Maverick (TV) followed by The Saint TV series.  Suave, but offbeat.  Drove a car similar in outward appearance to the Bond car (a Volvo, hardly an Aston Martin!), but I was a kid – what did I know?

Had clever lines, foiled the bad guys – who could want for more?

Eventually, he replaced Connery, Lazenby as Bond.  I’d read all the books by then, and, while I enjoyed Live And Let Die, it was NOT Connery nor Lazenby, and had a campy, Batmanesque manner to it.

Not the James Bond I had grown to love.

I ended up watching two or three more of the Moore Bond films (of the eventual seven) and gave up.

I did enjoy The Persuaders, a British TV romp opposite Tony Curtis.  But, it only lasted two years.

And there were non-Bond films, like Shout at the Devil (1976), The Wild Geese (1978) and North Sea Hijack (1979), among others.

But, I never forgave him for his the comic book portrayal of Bond.

He did take a conservative anti-Bond stance in an interview I once saw.  He was a conservative, religious man, and suggested Bond was not a very moral man.  Certainly not one he would like dating his daughter!  He was probably correct in this assessment.

And he made it to 89.  And was knighted.

You will be missed.

Just not as James Bond (by me, anyway).

Powers Boothe, RIP

You guys know how much I love character actors.

Sadly, another one has passed on – Powers Boothe.  Yesterday, of natural causes.

He’s one of those guys whom I had difficulty remembering his name, but loved his work.

Most of you probably remember him as ‘Curly’ Bill Brocius from the epic film Tombstone.

But he was so much more.

Jim Jones, Sin City, The Avengers, Deadwood, Agents of Shield, Nashville, Red Dawn, and 24 among many others.  He did the voice-over for Con Air.

I’ll always have a fondness for Philip Marlowe-Private Eye and Rapid Fire (wherein he played opposite Brandon Lee).

You will indeed be missed.

 

From Not Clauswitz

media-collusion.jpg

Now, it makes sense that people who travel in the same circles with similar interests would meet and perhaps get involved.  Or married.

And their are examples of opposites – Mary Matalin and James Carville, for example.

But, it does make one wonder…

Rifleman Babylon?

When I was growing up, there were numerous Westerns on television.  Being raised by TV, I was familiar with most.  One of them was The Rifleman (1958-1963).

The Rifleman, aka Lucas McCain, was played to his macho hilt by Chuck Connors, a 6’5″ athlete (from Wikipedia, in part):

Kevin Joseph Aloysius “Chuck” Connors (April 10, 1921 – November 10, 1992) was an American actor, writer and professional basketball and baseball player. He is one of only 12 athletes in the history of American professional sports to have played both Major League Baseball and in the National Basketball Association. With a 40-year film and television career, he is best known for his five-year role as Lucas McCain in the highly rated ABC series The Rifleman (1958–63).[1]

There was a book, first published in 1965, entitled Hollywood Babylon.  There have been two subsequent printings.  The book went out of it’s way to defame the famous in Hollywood, mentioning the scandals, the rumors, the crime, the ‘dirt’ for which the public was so hungry.  Sal Mineo, Sharon Tate, Jayne Mansfield et al.

I don’t believe Chuck was mentioned in any of them.

The theme of the TV show was almost always (TV violence aside), a lesson which Lucas (a widower) would impart to his young son, Mark.  I remember one particular episode wherein the lecture was (at the end of the show after much gunfighting) regarding people who are differentAnd just because they are different, doesn’t automatically make them BAD.  And how we, as honest human beings should strive to be accepting of such folk.

Of course, I was a kid, so this message went over my head.  When I saw the show again years later, some additional context was added.

An acquaintance, who has been a professional gun writer for many years, happened to see Chuck Connors at a large California gun show.  IN FULL DRAG! – complete with a wig and makeup!  This was a short time before he passed away.

This is not to defame Mr. Connors, but to suggest perhaps he and the TV show writers had a meeting-of-the-minds (?)

There are further rumors regarding Mr. Connors behavior all over the Internet.  As there are with pretty much anyone regarded as ‘famous’.

Just because it says so on the Internet doesn’t make it true! – Abraham Lincoln

I remember sharing this tale with a collections manager @ TMCCC* (my last workplace).  He ran away from me, covering his ears as though he were five years old!  Obviously, I had been messing with a macho hero of his!

Be judicious with whom you share this tale.

*That Major Credit Card Company

No New Ideas

whatyear

I’m thoroughly convinced.  Hollywood has officially run out of ideas.

We were watching commercial TV last night.  The big promo was the announcement of the premiere of the new TV show Prison Break!  (Hmmm?  Wasn’t there a show with a similar title a few years back?  Hey look! – they have the same cast!)

Television has a plethora of repeats or re-writes.  Time After Time, based on the 70’s film with the same name, is now a series.  (BTW – there are at least another THREE time-travel-themed TV shows.  Stop looking at each other’s papers!)

I realize there are only so many formats, and popular themes make money.  And, to be honest, I enjoy some of the retreads.

But, how many?

Sherlock Holmes, Elementary, Star Trek Generation ∞, C.H.I.P.s, Going in Style, ….

When did sequels and re-writes champion original ideas and thoughts?  (not to mention some re-makes are abysmal!  The Man From UNCLE?)

Get some original ideas, people!

Rule Five – Firefly/Serenity (NSFW-ish)

Just Because…

(Four reasons to bring back Firefly!)

Gina Torres

Jewel Staite

Summer Glau

Morena Baccarin

I’ll be in my bunk…

 

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…