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Having ‘The Talk’

No, not the birds and bees with your children, or the inane TV show.

(from the USCCA and Kevin Michalowski)

Kevin_ITF_Email_VideoPlayer_3-14-16

Sooner or later you will have to talk to your non-gun-owning friends about why you carry. You might be asked not to carry at someone’s house. Or you might be grilled on gun safety at your house when people come to visit. I can’t give you the exact words; they are your friends, not mine. But understand that…

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SO…it’s NOT just about Safety.

It’s about rights, and protection, and so much more.

There have been a few places I’ve chosen to not carry, and not by government edict, either.  It’s been about respect, perceived security, and sometimes plain ol’ convenience.

But sometimes having a civil Talk is just what seems appropriate.

Variety IS Life-Saving

(from Into The Fray – USCCA Blog – Kevin Michalowski)

I know this is the second week in a row I have talked about comments to Into the Fray videos, but I feel it is very important to point out that when it comes to defensive training, there is no ONE single way that people must do anything.
Every situation is dynamic. Every person is different. We are trying to present broad-based information from a variety of sources. What we present here is not THE way, it is A way. If you disagree, please do so politely and logically. We can all learn from each other, share knowledge, and exchange ideas. Nobody knows it all, but the more we share, the safer we will all be.
More Tools?
Yeah, it is a cliché, but every cliché starts with the truth somewhere along the line. If your only tool is a hammer, everything starts to look like a nail. Broaden your firearms knowledge by listening, thinking critically, and exchanging your views. We are all in this together.

https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/ccw-permits-skyrocketing-minnesota/

I’m a big believer in the Bruce Lee modality.  Essentially, kata, like standing still and punching paper, is not a survival skill unto itself.  Sifu Lee called kata ‘vertical death’.  So is doing the same thing, the same way.  If you are under attack, you could lose more than your lunch if you are trying to get into a specific fighting stance.  I’m a big believer in The Weaver Stance.  This doesn’t mean I don’t know how to shoot Isosceles or one-handed or weak handed.

Or while laying on the ground, on my side or my back!  Sights will line up, even if you are upside down!

Being disabled, and having a fused hip, kicking someone in the head is not good for me tactically.  Knees are better, as are sticky and trapping hands – close quarter work.  Rapidly ‘going prone’ is also probably not an option for me.  Neither is sprinting 50 yards to find cover.  Ambling sometimes presents a challenge.

Use the tools and skills available to you, specifically!  Change it up, as necessary.

“Characteristics of the Armed Individual” Secret Service Training

usssThis is probably brule’ for those of us who are ‘gunnies’ and carry with regularity, but is still interesting with regard to how those in the federal law enforcement circle views such things.

It IS nice edged weapons are included!

(from The Firearms Blog)

The guide itself is rather basic, mostly written word of generally common-sense spotting techniques that most law enforcement would look for during any encounter.

The first and basic step is to “determine (the) strong side” which can be determined by looking for cues such as watches, writing, smoking, and other daily tasks.

Then, according to the Secret Service “An individual who carries a gun on their person will periodically touch that gun both consciously and unconsciously.” (I disagree with this, carrying on a regular basis and with training, many concealed carriers will not touch their firearm, but can see how for MOST encounters, this is true).

Perhaps the most interesting nugget (At least to me) is that the “the majority of right-handed people that carry handguns illegally carry them in the right front waist band, loose.” The document then explains that its because doing so is “cool”, seen in the movies” and “where it is most secure and accessible.”

You can see the whole document here, courtesy of Public Intelligence. (6 pages PDF)

I was reminded of walking through downtown Scottsdale (many years ago) after the Az CCW law initially passed.  In a couple of hours, I spotted at least nine persons carrying concealed weapons.  I’m certain part of the observation was this was a relatively new legal behavior and folks weren’t used to doing so yet.  But people tugging up on there waist bands on the right side under their overshirts, and wearing overshirts were a good beginning!

Most cops or plainclothes agents aren’t that concerned with concealment, and get accustomed to carrying many hour a day, and have done so for years.

Having done so, myself, for many years, I’ve the same comfort and familiarity.

And hope you have it, as well!

bianchi

The Social Contract – Endgame

lockeThose of you who have read (political) History are familiar with John Locke, and his concept of the Social Contract(?)  You remember, the idea that ‘We The People’ make a Contract with those we ‘choose’ to govern us(?)

The basis for The Declaration of Independence.

Well, here is a prime (negative) example.

(courtesy of Joel)

Hey, remember last month when Virginia’s Attorney General threw CCW holders under the bus?

Well, good news, everyone! Governor Terry McAuliffe and “republican leaders” have concluded a series of backroom agreements that restores reciprocity, sort of, and all the repubs and the NRA had to give away was any hope of Virginia gun owners ever feeling safe from the state…

In exchange, Republicans softened their stances on issues that have long been non-starters in the GOP-controlled General Assembly. Under the deal, the state would take guns away from anyone who was under a two-year protective order for domestic-violence offenses. And State Police would have to attend all gun shows to provide background checks for private sellers if they requested the service.

So everything’s cool, Virginia, except that you better never get your wife mad at you and there’ll be armed goons looking over your shoulder any time you think it might be fun to pop into a gun show. But other than that, yay! Say hey for the beauties of compromise, I guess…

Of course, there’s that pesky (federal) Lautenberg Amendment thing, too.

When we make a contract with government, there is ALWAYS the other side to the contract.  Their codicil spelling out our duties and responsibilities under the ‘agreement’.

Because they never just give us anything – not when they can use a hook!

Stinkin’ Badges, Part Two

or rather, stinkin’ permits!

Last week, the Attorney General in Virginia decided to cancel reciprocity with 25 other states. The uproar around the country among gun enthusiasts was considerable. This brought up, once again, the issue of a national reciprocity law, which, as I pointed out, would be unconstitutional under the Tenth Amendment.

Now, in no way was that post meant to suggest that I am not a fan of universal reciprocity for carry permits. In fact, I believe that insofar as a government has the right to place prerequisites on the exercise of my civil rights by requiring that I obtain a permit to do so, then no government has the right to decide that the decision of any other government is null and void in its jurisdiction.*

But, given that the Constitution does not give Congress the authority to regulate carry permits, or the carry of guns, how then do we accomplish this?

I mentioned in my last posting that one argument cited for government mandated reciprocity is the Driver’s License system. After all, they argue, since my driver’s license is recognized by other states, my carry permit should be as well. While I agree with that premise, most people who argue this route don’t realize that this is the result of an agreement between the States, not because of any law.

What, then, should be our answer?

For me it is simple: abolish the carry permit system altogether.

Why? Because it’s unnecessary, under any understanding of the Second Amendment.

And yet, states require carry permits, and most of us think nothing of it. In fact, we make a big deal of it. “Look at me!” we rejoice. “The Government has acceded to grant me its begrudging permission to exercise a right already guaranteed under the Constitution!”

Naturally, the anti-gunners will argue that without a permit system any criminal would be allowed to carry a gun. How would we be protected from such a thing?

And yet, it should be obvious that criminals carry a gun now without permits. The law does not change their actions, because, by definition, they are criminals.

So, how do we get the permit system revoked?

Unfortunately, we white Americans are going to have to be honest about our white forefathers, and be honest about how it all began – as a way to keep guns out of the hands blacks. So to make the permit system go away, we have to show how racist the whole system was, and how that discrimination carries over to today, by allowing the government to know just who owns guns.

Think about how effective this would be, to tie in the carry permit system with the images of Jim Crow, the Confederacy, and the KKK.

Can we do this? Yes. Will we do this? I don’t know, but I hope so. Because, honestly, it is the best route to national reciprocity – by making every American equal.

At last.

(from Fill Yer Hands, in full)

Out of the hands of Blacks, and undesirable foreigners. (Sullivan Law)

Control is control is control.  It’s what statists, of all flavors, want.

A Couple Of Observations Regarding O.C.

From NJT

Pelosi v 2.0

Nancy Pelosi’s daughter:  “Should we protect police by ending Open Carry?

T-Bolt: “No.  Next question.”

Aw, c’mon T-Bolt!  Elaborate.

Well, have a lot of Open Carry types aired out cops?  No.  The threat to cops is not from them.  At worst, a subset of OC folks have been douchenozzles.  But those folks are a subject of ridicule, and not a threat vector for law enforcement.   And folks do, indeed have the right to, among other things, be a douchenozzle.

And trying to connect OC with the Tamir Rice thing, Ms. Pelosi Jr.?  Please…

“Did you call me a douchenozzle?  I’m OFFENDED!”

“I see.”

Being an over-the-top, obnoxious idiot when carrying a firearm, whether concealed or openly, is not recommended.  Doing so tends to bring the attention of the constabulary and hoplophobes, everywhere.

In a libertarian, constitutional world, law-abiding citizens should be able to carry in any manner.  Any kind of weapon.

Period.

Has ANYONE ever made the observation that uniformed police open carry with impunity?
Should we be offended by THAT?  And in so doing, are they less safe?
Of course not, and in the sense of parity and civil liberties, they should not be offended by lawful civilians open-carrying.
SO THERE!
(Having said that, there is something to be said for being discrete.  :-)  )

What To Do If You Face An Active Shooter

Questions are coming in about what to do if you face an active shooter. The short answer is slow down. Don’t rush into the action. Remember you are responsible for every round you fire—and if you shoot the wrong person, you will go to jail. Worse yet, you could end up getting shot by another Good Samaritan looking to stop the shooter.

Slow down. Gather information. See and understand the situation before you jump into it.

Move. Shoot. Communicate.

If you don’t know what is going on, keep your finger off the trigger. Observe before you act. Get as much information as you possibly can before you decide to engage.

Excellent advice from Kevin Michalowski @ USCCA !

REMEMBER – The vast majority of us aren’t SpecOps guys, or active law enforcement.  We have no duty to engage.  Speaking for myself, I’m an ‘armchair adventurer’ at best, and a old, crippled one.  And I don’t wear a cape or cowl.

Carry Nation

(from the lovely and talented Tamara)

It’s called a “carry gun” for a reason.

Throwing “gun stolen from car” into the Google box rarely leaves one empty-handed:

6:58 a.m. — An man reported the theft of a black-and-silver Kel-Tec 9mm pistol and belt-clip holster from an unlocked garage on the 300 block of East Fifth Street. The pistol was taken from a vehicle, which was also unlocked. The estimated value is $300.

I’ll just repeat myself here: Don’t leave unsecured guns in your unsecured car. And if it’s your “carry gun”, then why the hell ain’t youcarrying it? Some dude busts up into your house and you’re gonna tell him “Hang on, I have to go out to the driveway and fetch my carry gun”? You keep using that word; I do not think it means what you think it means…

(Also? Dude’s pretty optimistic about the value of a used Kel-Tec that seems to spend a goodly portion of its life in a car.)

The subject’s choice of a defensive firearm aside (First Rule in a Gunfight – Have a gun!), I’d an additional thought about this:
To all those folks who leave their sidearms in the safe, in the car, locked away…
Ask them to substitute seat belt or fire extinguisher for the tool’s name!
“I left my seat belt locked away in the safe”
“I locked up my fire extinguisher, lest kids get to it.”
A.C.E. – ALWAYS CARRY EVERYWHERE
And if you cannot (metal detectors, people being frisked willy-nilly) make certain it is secured!

Lessons From Carrying A Gun

Tom Lindsay, of Fill Yer Hands, was kind enough to share with us his observations:

Tom McHale posted a nice article a couple of weeks ago, about 10 Things You Learn By Carrying a Gun Every Day.

This got me to thinking about the lessons I’ve learned, and I would like to share a few.

I’ve been carrying a gun almost everywhere for about the last 14 years or so, ever since we moved to Georgia. Before that I carried from time to time, mostly for travel, but not to work, and not during most social events. My reasons why I didn’t carry are probably the good subject of another post, for another day.

But now, carrying almost all the time, I’ve come to learn some things. I agree with Tom McHale’s first four points, and I have experimented with a few belts and holsters, to find the ones that work best for me.

Having said that, here are some observations and Lessons Learned:

Condition Yellow takes concentration, but that’s not a bad thing. Once you get used to it, it gets a little easier.

But it still takes concentration. A lapse in that – slipping into Condition White – may be the last thing I experience in this life.

It takes thought and concentration in other areas, too. Like planning ahead for bathroom breaks. You have to have a plan.

More people carry than you think. I routinely look for telltales when others are carrying, as much out of curiosity as to know who would be on my side if the balloon went up.

It’s no big deal to my wife and kids. Once they got used to me carrying, and asking for the seat facing the door, etc., it became almost second nature.

Sometimes my wardrobe is dictated by my choice to carry. But that isn’t as big a deal as I thought it would be. Of course, gone are sweat pants in public. At my age, that’s not such a bad idea, though. As it turns out, I have become a Hawaiian shirt aficionado in warmer months, and a fleece vest guy in the cooler months.

At least in Georgia, Gun Free Zones are pretty much worthless to me. I can discuss this in another post, but I generally ignore the signs, since, for the most part, they have no legal force in Georgia. But exceptions are exceptions (like the Post Office), and those I do honor. For the rest of you (and this means you, Taco Mac) I don’t pay any attention. Trust me, if I’m there when something goes down, you won’t care that I’m violating your sign.

Despite what movies and some online Gun Heroes want you to think, if the balloon goes up, I am there to protect me and my family. Unless there is a compelling reason, that means I’m not chasing any bad guys or saving anyone but us. Sorry.

More to come, I am sure . . .

I’ve been carrying a little longer than Mr. Lindsay, but generally do not disagree.  Except, I’ve made the decision to A.C.E.  ALWAYS CARRY EVERYWHERE.  Of course, that means everywhere possible.

In Arizona, businesses may post signage to discourage customers and visitors from carrying into their establishments.  Barring a physical confrontation, the most that could happen if observed violating the law would be being asked to leave (to remove the weapon from the establishment or just leave) lest they get charged with trespassing.

Seriously, what business owner in their right mind would approach a customer violating the law by being armed and ask them to leave?  I suspect most would either ignore it (if the customer appeared docile) or just call the cops.

Me?  I’ve never been observed or asked.  That I’ve been aware of.

I always think of Dr. Suzanna Gratia Hupp, a chiropractor (eventually a Texas State Representative) who obeyed Texas law and left her gun locked in her car.  Then accompanied her parents into Furr’s Cafeteria in Killeen, Texas.  Her parents and 22 others were subsequently murdered, in part because Dr. Hupp was unable to respond.  Because she voluntarily obeyed the disarmament sign.

And when criminals take it upon themselves to attack the public, or schoolchildren (in gun-free zones), what is the prescribed course of action?

Call people with guns to respond to alleviate the situation.

So, why not just carry?

Will Your Shirt Get You Killed?

Whether or not you agree with Kevin’s technique from the USCCA, it IS important to remember:

Practice with the gun and holster you use, AND the clothing you normally wear.

If this technique doesn’t work for you, find one that does.

Practical practice makes perfect – or at least a better chance of survival.

h/t USCCA

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…

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