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discipline

This tag is associated with 14 posts

What To Do? Put ‘Em In The Corner?

(from Kenny)

The Australian school board condones this?

Teachers at a primary school in Sydney, Australia have been threatened with beheading and other violence from young Islamic students, prompting one of them to quit her job.

Students as young as those in Year 5, according to the Daily Telegraph, are making the violent threats and pressuring others to read the Koran at Punchbowl Public School in Sydney.

Documents given to the newspaper allege that three staff members have taken a leave of absence owing to stress, received counselling and been awarded compensation after bullying from Islamic students.
MORE

Political Correctness is killing Europe, Asia, and has landed here.

Teachers not allowed to control their classrooms?  Of course, we are seeing that here, as well.  Just not to THIS degree (yet).

At least we have a Bill of Rights.  Australia has none – although some of their States have ‘something’.

You know I’m all for property trained personnel with guns in schools.  Australia, not so pro-gun.  If a terrorist presents a viable threat against an administrator, teacher or student, there would be a solution here.

I don’t care is they are another student!  If they are armed and refuse to stand down and be arrested…

Staff members being bullied?

I don’t think so…

It’s March Fifth, Again! 

from the desk of GUFFAW

from the desk of GUFFAW

Back in 2011, I had been laid off from TMCCC, disabled due to having had lymphoma, and had been spending a large part of my day reading blogs on the Internet.

No, this was NOT in my mother’s basement!  😛

Frankly, as I had found a number of women who were shooters who wrote blogs (they became my Blogmothers ™!), I had hoped to find someone closer to home.  Unfortunately, they were in Indiana, Ohio and Idaho.

I’m in Arizona.

But, I had no luck in the geography department…  😦

After a year-and-a-half, it occurred to me, ‘Hey, I could do this!’ (or, at least mimic others, and steal their material…)

And Guffaw in AZ was born.

So now it’s YEAR SIX!

Posting something DAILY (sometimes two, three or four posts).  Daily funnies, beauties, videos and quotes, additionally.

With no real purpose, except to have something to do, and a daily discipline.

And the completely unexpected happened.

I MADE FRIENDS!

Friends all over the World!  Europe, Asia, the Middle East, Pakistan and India, South America.  Mostly, of course, in the United States.

A huge thank you goes out to the generosity of people I only know through the Internet, who have offered me support, both moral and financial.  And given me gifts!  You know who you are…

I miss those who are no longer blogging, by choice or life circumstance – North, Matt, Maura, CoolChange, William the Coroner and many others.  (If I’ve left you off the list and you are still around, please forgive me).

I am SO GRATEFUL for (in no particular order) Bobbi, Tam, Doc in Yuma, Ron, Proud Hillbilly, Paul, Kevin Baker and the other Kevin, Southern Belle and KX59, Tom, Biff, Keads, Bluesun, Wirecutter, Jim, Greg, Kenny, Quizikle, Sean, Irish, Jeffery and Wilson.

And especially Murphy, Brigid, ASM826 and Borepatch!  And Judy, my roomie!

And my dear friend Dave the genius (who prefers to be called Dave the mechanic) who sends me multiple funnies daily to possibly include in the blog!  And who – when he is in town – takes me out for Red Devil pizza!  And who has been a loyal friend since 1973.

And to all you loyal folks who don’t blog or even leave comments but bother to stop by – THANK YOU!

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13,669 comments

On to 2018?

PS – (Why Tamara is in red, above) Apologies to the lovely and talented Tamara, who somehow was left off my gratitude list last year!  A correction has been made, and I plan on penance by shooting myself in the knee with a VeloDog, as soon as I can afford one!

PPS – TMCCC  (for the uninitiated) stands for That Major Credit Card Company, where I worked as a credit card fraud investigator for almost 22 years.

 

 

No Good Deed…

You know the rest!

With both my roommate and I having infirmities and physical limitations (along with no longer being 22!) sometimes things get procrastinated about, or just ignored.

One of those things is our back ‘yard’.

Living in a small townhouse, the yard isn’t particularly large, but my roomie, with her love for the flora, has numerous plants, both potted and in the ground, which sometimes require tending.

And between recent other adventures and doctor’s appointments, the yard has not seen proper maintenance.

And a number of ‘volunteer’ plants have been added to the mix by Mother Nature.  Like lantana, which has taken over to the extent we cannot reach the hose bib or electric box!

Now, there is a time constraint, as her first shoulder surgery is scheduled for March 21.  And I suspect nurse will be added to the title chief cook and bottle washer for me.  And, with her right arm immobilized for a minimum of six weeks, her physical abilities will be severely limited.

So, Thursday last, I carved out some time in the morning to take a stab at the yard.  Because it was necessary. (It didn’t help a number of massive fronts were coming in from California starting Friday!)

My target:

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(the white structure on the right is a non-functional Jacuzzi – now a plant stand)

I popped a significant pain pill, waited for it to kick in and headed out.  Wishing in all seriousness I had a machete ala Indiana Jones.

I had a rake, a shovel, and a weed-eater.

The plan was to work until it was done – no excuses!  Then, the pain pill wore off.  At about two hours.  When not involved in manual labor, they last four or more!

So much for THAT idea.

BUT, I cleaned up 75-80% of the yard, obtained access to the bib and the utility box (getting stabbed byagave-americana the century plant at least twice!), and trimmed back the palm tree by the back gate as to only get attacked by one palm frond, in lieu of three.

With palms like these, who needs anemones? – Thelonious Monk (from the liner notes for the Dave Brubeck ‘Take Five’ album)

More obviously needs to be done.  But that’s for another day.

And Friday and Saturday I paid for my good deed…

My arthritis kicked in big time, as did muscle pain, general tiredness and malaise.

And my doc wants me to limit use of NSAIDS, having over-used them for the past twenty years or more.

SIGH.

How To Spot A Concealed Handgun

The Art of Manliness (a blog to which I sometimes refer) not only addresses etiquette, style and proper behavior, but also delves into ‘manly’ things such as camping, hunting, shooting, unarmed combat and other esoterica.  (Of course, many of these subjects may be of interest to women, as well!) 🙂

A recent guest post was entitled as above.  I’m posting it below, in it’s entirety, not just to entertain and inform, but to show those who do carry behaviors and appearances which may bring to them unwarranted attention.

Enjoy!

How to Spot a Concealed Handgun

By A Manly Guest Contributor on Oct 21, 2016 02:10 pm

The following is an excerpt from 100 Deadly Skills: Survival Edition — The SEAL Operative’s Guide to Surviving in the Wild and Being Prepared for Any Disaster. A follow-up to Clint’s first bestseller — 100 Deadly Skills: The SEAL Operative’s Guide to Eluding Pursuers, Evading Capture, and Surviving Any Dangerous Situation — this new survival edition offers primers on any survival situation imaginable, from wilderness scenarios, to terrorism and kidnappings, to natural disasters.

100-deadly-survival_final

CONOP: Concept of Operations; COA: Course of Action; BLUF: Bottom Line Up Front

Individuals who carry a handgun professionally are well attuned to the range of mannerisms that can indicate the presence of a concealed weapon within their vicinity. Civilians, too, can learn to familiarize themselves with these signs and signals. When combined with suspicious behavior, the suspected presence of a concealed weapon should put bystanders on high alert.

Body Language: People carrying handguns tend to subconsciously telegraph the location of the weapon via their body language. They may reflexively palpate the gun to make sure the weapon is still safely in its holster, subtly re-position the weapon prior to sitting or standing, or shift their weight away from nearby bystanders to avoid accidental contact with or theft of the weapon.

Asymmetry: Another telltale sign is asymmetry in clothing. Guns are heavy and bulky, and thus will betray signs of their presence to anyone who’s paying attention. An outside-the-waistband holster may cause a visible midline bulge, while an ankle holster may cause a bulge or tightening of the fabric at the lower leg. A gun held in a jacket pocket will weight down one side of the jacket unevenly.

Environment: Hot or inclement weather can make concealed weapons easier to spot. Rain, wind, or sweat can reveal the outline of a gun, which will generally be much easier to hide under multiple layers of cold-weather clothing.

Negligence: Weapons are also frequently exposed due to temporary negligence, flashed or inadvertently dropped as a gunman reaches for his wallet. Dropped weapons are an all-too-common scenario at public urinals, where inexperienced perpetrators may thoughtlessly unzip their pants — thereby releasing the tension that was holding up the holster.

The post How to Spot a Concealed Handgun appeared first on The Art of Manliness.

Living At Home

I lived in my parent’s house after high school, and into college.  The University was about a mile-and-a-half North, and an easy walk.  Things became ‘complicated’ when I dropped-out after a year, and was on academic probation. (long-time readers will remember Joe Cool?).  My parents then required rent and employment (I had been working the entire time), and two years later (age 20) I moved out simultaneously with starting at a community college.

I thought I was a failure.

Ultimately, I completed community college (3.615 GPA,with high distinction, don’t ya know!), got my Associates Degree (Administration of Justice), and entered life.  It’s amazing how the realities of financial obligation and low paying jobs motivate!  During the recession (1975).  No decent jobs.

BUT, somehow I survived.  I paid my own way through college (no loans, no parent money), worked then entire time (mostly in private security) and paid rent – sometimes even on time!  😛

The idea of moving back into my parent’s home was anathema to me.  My father’s passing in 1977 further reinforced the concept (I didn’t have a good relationship with my stepmother).

For the first time in modern history the most common living arrangement for young adults is living in their parents’ homes. (18 to 34)

I wonder how this happened?  Poor employment opportunities?  Low pay?  Bad economy?  I suspect the liberals will blame it on the debt based on Bush’s wars.  And the banks.

And the conservatives will blame the race-baiting, anti-colonialist communist administration currently in residence in the White House.

But I blame government.  ALL of it.  Between inflation, costly inefficient government programs and the cost of education requiring student loans.   And Fabian socialists forging dishistory and uneducated youth since the early 1900’s.  They work glacially.

It’s who I am.

h/t Theo Spark

 

Training Classes Do Not Make For A Better Shooter

(from TFB)

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According to Tim Herron of Team Sig Sauer there is a lot of misinformation from Armchair Experts. He breaks down five things he advises to be a better shooter.

  1. Dryfire. It’s real. And it works. It also costs NOTHING but an investment of your time and the benefits are endless.
  2. Training Classes do not make a better shooter. Practicing what you learn from those classes is what makes you a better shooter. Training classes merely gives you new ideas to practice on.
  3. Gear is never the answer. You can improve with what you have.
  4. Focus your practice on purposeful things. Things that really apply. Literal tons of repetitions both in dryfire and live fire and immense amount of PURPOSEFUL rounds down range.
  5. Finally, stop with the delusions of self grandeur. Want to start truly improving? Quit BS’ing each other on the Internet and get your rear end to work. You don’t learn this stuff by osmosis. And you certainly don’t get better at any of this by repeating the baseless BS you read or heard some supposed “hardcore operator or competitor” say out of context to someone else 3rd person.

Tim has some good points and some of them seem obvious. However I do argue against the “gear is never the answer”. If gear is not the answer then why do people not compete with Hipoints? To a certain degree gear matters. There is a reason people don’t use Uncle Mike’s holsters for serious shooting.  Also gear can help with some shortcomings one may have. For example, red dots on handguns is easier and quicker for people with poor eyesight.

What are you thoughts on Tim’s analysis and advice? To read his entire article check it out here at MASF.

Being an ‘armchair expert’, I resemble that remark!  🙂  Seriously, I no longer have the means to get to the range (or the desert) on a regular basis.  And my ‘edge’ (if I ever had one) has significantly rounded.  😦

Having said that, dreaming of more or better gear (if only I had another, different, newer gun…) or (if I had the opportunity) tossing lead downrange at paper villains willy-nilly doesn’t solve the problem!  It doesn’t even address it.

Because there’s no focus.  No purpose (see above).

Yeah, plinking is loads of fun, but doesn’t sharpen one’s skill set.  Muscle memory is degradable.

HOWEVER, dry practice (the aforementioned dry firing), coupled with presentation, trigger control, sight picture and compressed-surprise brake can make for a fun and valuable learning experience!  And an inexpensive means of keeping up one’s skill set.

WHAT Are Those Four Rules, Again?

(from Free North Carolina)

https://i1.wp.com/wusa-download.edgesuite.net/video/2163306/2163306_Thumb.jpg
 Brilliant.

An officer in the Metropolitan Police Department’s first district “dry-fired” an unloaded weapon at the head of another officer during a roll-call meeting on Saturday afternoon, possibly under orders from a sergeant as part of a training exercise, four MPD sources tell WUSA9.

Those sources say a Sergeant later told officers in the room that they had secretly ordered the officer to unload his weapon and then pretend to fire on his colleague as part of a “training exercise” on situational awareness. The officer then pulled the trigger of the unloaded weapon while pointing it at the head of an officer until it audibly clicked, the sources say.

Both the officer who allegedly fired the weapon and the sergeant who allegedly ordered him are assigned to regular duties, pending an internal affairs investigation, MPD spokesman Sean Hickman tells WUSA9.

“I can tell you there are about seven different versions of the incident that are out there,” MPD Chief Cathy Lanier told reporters on Monday. “I’m not sure which or how many of those that you’ve heard, but I prefer to wait until I see some facts and some direct statements of what happened before I make a judgment.”

Who said law enforcement officers are better trained than the public?  I know the officer probably needs his/her paycheck, but I think my response would have been something akin to “Are you SERIOUS?”, and if the response were in the affirmative, QUIT ON THE SPOT!
Should there have been an ‘accident’, I’m certain the officer in question would have used the defense “I was just following orders!” – a defense we’ve heard before, somewhere.
For The Four Rules in question, please refer to the blog sidebar…

“Characteristics of the Armed Individual” Secret Service Training

usssThis is probably brule’ for those of us who are ‘gunnies’ and carry with regularity, but is still interesting with regard to how those in the federal law enforcement circle views such things.

It IS nice edged weapons are included!

(from The Firearms Blog)

The guide itself is rather basic, mostly written word of generally common-sense spotting techniques that most law enforcement would look for during any encounter.

The first and basic step is to “determine (the) strong side” which can be determined by looking for cues such as watches, writing, smoking, and other daily tasks.

Then, according to the Secret Service “An individual who carries a gun on their person will periodically touch that gun both consciously and unconsciously.” (I disagree with this, carrying on a regular basis and with training, many concealed carriers will not touch their firearm, but can see how for MOST encounters, this is true).

Perhaps the most interesting nugget (At least to me) is that the “the majority of right-handed people that carry handguns illegally carry them in the right front waist band, loose.” The document then explains that its because doing so is “cool”, seen in the movies” and “where it is most secure and accessible.”

You can see the whole document here, courtesy of Public Intelligence. (6 pages PDF)

I was reminded of walking through downtown Scottsdale (many years ago) after the Az CCW law initially passed.  In a couple of hours, I spotted at least nine persons carrying concealed weapons.  I’m certain part of the observation was this was a relatively new legal behavior and folks weren’t used to doing so yet.  But people tugging up on there waist bands on the right side under their overshirts, and wearing overshirts were a good beginning!

Most cops or plainclothes agents aren’t that concerned with concealment, and get accustomed to carrying many hour a day, and have done so for years.

Having done so, myself, for many years, I’ve the same comfort and familiarity.

And hope you have it, as well!

bianchi

Beer

Being diabetic, alcohol is probably something I shouldn’t consume in quantity.  Besides, I made up for it during my college years! 😛

And somewhat after…

Regardless, occasionally I still enjoy a good beer.  By choice, I significantly cut back on the quantity I was imbibing as of 1 January, and have lost a significant amount of weight.

But sometimes…

I’m not a fan of IPAs.  India Pale Ales.  They are just too hoppy for me.  In my youth, I was a Budweiser man, escalating to Michelob for special occasions.  And light beer never appealed to me.  And heavy porters and such just aren’t for me.  Not Guiness, either (sorry Brigid!)  With the advent of micro-breweries, there have developed many more choices, however.

Lately, I’ve been enjoying Blue Moon, which is a Belgian Wheat Ale with orange undertone.  Good restaurants serve it with an orange slice.  Quite refreshing in the hot Summer months.  I used to enjoy Lumberyard Raspberry Ale – but sadly the microbrewery in Flagstaff stopped production of this nectar.  A couple of dear friends have gifted me with Lindeman’s Framboise Lambic, a low alcohol content from Belgium which can only be described as tasting like raspberry champagne!  And, it’s corked!  They have also given us Sonora White Chocolate Ale, which is yummy in combination with the Lambic, or all by itself.  Sadly, I don’t drink these as often, because I view them as for special occasions.  And I only have so many.  🙂

Once of my loyal blog readers is Dave, of Musings Over A Pint.  If you like thoughtful discourse, and discussion regarding beer, and firearms (separately, of course!) Dave’s your guy.

Give him a visit!

“Beer is proof that God loves us, and wants us to be happy.” – Benjamin Franklin

(Sadly, this is a misquote.  What Dr. Franklin actually said was, “Behold the rain which descends from heaven upon our vineyards, there it enters the roots of the vines, to be changed into wine, a constant proof that God loves us, and loves to see us happy.”)

But wine is for another post.

Cheers!  Or as Gramp always said, “Prosit” – loosely translated “May this beverage bring you health!”

What About Bob?, Part Tres’

I heard back from Bob this morning.  He remains hospitalized, and frankly, things are not good.

From the Man, himself:

I have been diagnosed with esophageal cancer.  (Apparently the leg amputation was simply a warm-up.)  I will begin three months of radiation and chemotherapy, soon to be followed by surgery to remove the lower third of my esophagus and upper portion of Mr. Stomach.

Prognosis is guarded.

I am attempting to remain positive and as upbeat as possible.

Can you believe this guy?!  Positive and upbeat?  I’d be a puddle on the floor…  😦

Please keep Bob in your thoughts and prayers.  He is a voracious reader (and likes paper media, eschewing the electronic), so I’m bringing him copies of Brigid’s two fine books, when he allows me to visit.

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…