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DHS Has A Secret Plan To Disable Cell Phones During “Emergencies”

(Yeah, I pretty much assumed so.  Because I SO trust government.  –  Guffaw)

The Supreme Court was asked in a petition to force the government to disclose the US clandestine plan to disable cell service during emergencies.

The case concerns Standard Operating Procedure 303. A federal appeals court in May said the government did not have to release its full contents because the Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) allows the authorities to withhold records if they would “endanger” public safety.

The Electronic Privacy Information Center told the high court’s justices Tuesday that the US Court of Appeals for the District of Columbia Circuit’s decision created a new “catchall provision that can be used in any case involving records related to domestic and national security programs.” (PDF)

The privacy group had demanded the documents from the Department of Homeland Security in 2011 following the shuttering of cell service in the San Francisco Bay Area subway system to quell a protest. The Department of Homeland Security refused to divulge the documents associated with SOP 303, which the appeals court described as a “unified voluntary process for the orderly shut-down and restoration of wireless services during critical emergencies such as the threat of radio-activated improvised explosive devices.”

Under the direction of the so-called National Security Telecommunications Advisory Committee, SOP 303 allows for the shuttering of wireless networks “within a localized area, such as a tunnel or bridge, and within an entire metropolitan area.”

The telecoms have agreed to shutter service when SOP 303 is invoked, but there are no publicly disclosed instances of the measure ever being invoked.

I’m guessing the Internet is included, as well.  Guess it’s back to smoke signals for us!

(Is it only me, but did ‘Rule 303’ pop into your head when you read this?)

h/t Ars Technica

“Stratfor? What’s A Stratfor?”

…to cook in!  NO – that’s a potfor!  :-)

This is no children’s joke…

NO, this is about STRATFOR

Earlier this year, private intelligence firm Strategic Forecasting, or Stratfor, published its Decade Forecast, in which it projects the next 10 years of global political and economic developments.

While international analysts often try their hand at predicting the major events of the coming year, Stratfor believes that it’s identified the major trends of the next 10.

In many ways, Stratfor thinks the world a decade from now will be more dangerous place, with US power waning and other prominent countries experiencing a period of chaos and decline.

An interest part of all this (which, in order to read, must be emailed free to you – if you are not a Stratfor subscriber) is little mention is made of the United States.  And the increase in ongoing, government-imposed tyranny.
We’ve a tendency, as participants in the American Experiment, to think ‘we’ will go on forever – I’m certain the Romans thought the same…
Still an interesting read.
(I’m not a subscriber – cannot afford it!)
h/t Brock Townsend

Gov’t Just CAN’T Leave Well Enough Alone!

As recently posted by the lovely and talented Tamara

The .gov giveth and the .gov taketh away…

So, with the brewing industry having finally (mostly) bounced back from Prohibition, and small craft breweries having sprung up all over, you just knew there was some way the feds could screw up a good thing, didn’t you?

Small breweries will have to spend hundreds of dollars per beer to analyze the nutritional value of each type sold.

“A good analysis [will cost] probably somewhere between the $500-$1,000 range of what I’ve seen. Then multiply it across the styles that you have,” said Lawinski.

And at a thousand dollars a pop, that could keep unique and seasonal brews from making it to your favorite watering hole.

I’m thinking the BATFE is seeing the handwriting on the wall, and we’ll see a sharp upturn in revenooers chasing moonshiners as well!  After all, Eliot Ness & Co. wants to keep their jobs!

Yep.  Government.

It continues to be all about control…

Now WHOM Should We Arrest?

as stolen from Wirecutter:

Between 1989 and 2010, U.S. attorneys seized an estimated $12.6 billion in asset forfeiture cases. The growth rate during that time averaged +19.4% annually.

In 2010 alone, the value of assets seized grew by +52.8% from 2009 and was six times greater than the total for 1989.

Then by 2014, that number had ballooned to roughly $4.5 billion for the year, making this 35% of the entire number of assets collected from 1989 to 2010 in a single year.

Now, according to the FBI, the total amount of goods stolen by criminals in 2014 burglary offenses suffered an estimated $3.9 billion in property losses. This means that the police are now taking more assets than the criminals.
MORE

Now, assuming these statistics are close to accurate (and we all know about assuming), this is a sobering statistic!

Does ANYONE remember their American History?  Life, Liberty, Property?  Bueller?  Bueller?

“I’ll Have A Che’se Burger With Everything!

Hold the Freedom Fries…

Via Iver

https://i1.wp.com/sandiegofreepress.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/02/Che-Cafe-UCSD1.jpg

It may offer the best political science course on campus, but the lessons are lost on bureaucrats: UC-San Diego’s fabled “Che Cafe” is awash in red ink and in need of a bailout.

Students have run the restaurant, named for Cuban revolutionary Che Guevara, for 34 years, but they’ve steered it into the ground. Boasting of “exorbitantly low” prices, the vegan co-op and concert venue that once hosted an up-and-coming Nirvana has cost the student body nearly $1 million over the years, and isn’t kept up to fire or safety codes. The ragtag band of volunteer staffers, who call themselves a “collective,” faced eviction in March, but have persuaded the school to save their beloved stronghold.

More @ Fox
Hey!  Income redistribution, man!
I want to go to the local university here, and open an unsanitary, unprofitable, collectivist health-food hole, and name it after another mass murderer! It’s certain to be a loss leader and on the government teat.  Maybe I can keep it going 34 years, too!
Let’s see – Stalin’s Vegan Steakburgers?  Mao’s Tongue (containing no animal products)?
I KNOW – Castro’s Playa Giron!  Pork BBQ!
We can reproduce The Stanford Prison Experiment in the back!
And if the staff goes on strike, we can just kill them.
I don’t know what is the most sad – that they exist at all, or that ‘educated’ college folk (and the gov’t) have supported them for 34 years!!
h/t Brock Townsend

Just When You Thought It Was Safe, Part III…

jawsor maybe IV, I forget. (courtesy of Old NFO,)

(aka, an extreme overuse of film icons…)

About that privacy…

You ‘thought’ you had…

Remember how criminal fingerprint bases were kept separate from military and civil (e.g. fingerprinted for a job)?

Yeah, not so much anymore…

I completely missed this one, but it came out in a discussion of the latest release of the ever increasing scope of the OPM hack (an additional 6 million files hacked, PLUS all fingerprints).

This from the EFF-

FBI Combines Civil and Criminal Fingerprints into One Fully Searchable Database

Being a job seeker isn’t a crime. But the FBI has made a big change in how it deals with fingerprints that might make it seem that way. For the first time, fingerprints and biographical information sent to the FBI for a background check will be stored and searched right along with fingerprints taken for criminal purposes.

The change, which the FBI revealed quietly in a February 2015 Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA), means that if you ever have your fingerprints taken for licensing or for a background check, they will most likely end up living indefinitely in the FBI’s NGI database. They’ll be searched thousands of times a day by law enforcement agencies across the country—even if your prints didn’t match any criminal records when they were first submitted to the system.

Full article HERE. What isn’t clear, but is included are ALL the military fingerprints, which we were told were always to be kept separately for security reasons…

Yeah, right… Shoulda known better…

You can read the Fibbies Privacy Impact Assessment (PIA) HERE.

Think about it… How many doors, objects, etc. do you touch on a daily basis when getting too/from work… The grab bar on the Metro, the bus, the door to the elevator, handrails? Bathroom doors? Restaurant doors at lunch?

Suppose there is an incident at a location you’ve been to, they dust and lo an behold your fingerprints show up…

You have a high security job, now how are you going to explain to YOUR security people why the cops just hauled you downtown for an ‘interview’…

BUT WAIT, THERE’S MORE!

But wait… It is going to get even better! For certain values of better…

Specifically, in 2012, Deputy Assistant Director Jerome Pender stated:

Only criminal mug shot photos are used to populate the national repository. Query photos and photos obtained from social networking sites, surveillance cameras, and similar sources are not used to populate the national repository.

But the new RFQ contradicts this because it appears the desired software would allow officers to submit non-mug shot photos to NGI. The RFQ says the FBI is looking for a mobile biometrics tool that would, “at a minimum . . . include fingerprints and facial photographs for submission and receipt of a response.” Photographs taken in the field are clearly not “mug shot photos” because they’re taken before booking and possibly even before arrest. And it’s hard to see how a mobile tool that allows officers to collect these non-mug shot photos and “submit” them to a database is not also “populating the national repository.”

The article from EFF is HERE. And HERE’s the link to the FedBizOps page for the biometric system…

Yep, kiss that whole privacy thing good by… As if we had any to start with…

h/t Lawdog

Yeah.  Thanks, Jim (and Lawdog)! (groan)

And, of course, we know the BATFE is not continuing to add to a database involving NICS check data, because it would be a violation of criminal law…

Yeah, right…

Ya think some enterprising young attorney at the DOJ isn’t conspiring to meld these databases together, along with Homeland Security?  For our safety, of course.

Yeah, right…

Pick one…

hal9000terminator

Food Stamps, Etc.

Doc in Yuma (a regular, loyal reader and sometime contributor) sent me this regarding control of Food Stamps.

Sent to him under the title “Compassionate Conservatism”.

Put me in charge…

  Put me in charge of food stamps. I’d get rid of Lone Star cards; no cash for
Ding Dongs or Ho Ho’s, just money for 50-pound bags of rice and beans,
blocks of cheese and all the powdered milk you can haul away.  If you want
steak and frozen pizza, then get a job.
  Put me in charge of Medicaid. The first thing I’d do is to get women
Norplant birth control implants or tubal ligations.  Then, we’ll test
recipients for drugs, alcohol, and nicotine and document all tattoos and
piercings.  If you want to reproduce or use drugs, alcohol, smoke or get
tats and piercings, then get a job.
  Put me in charge of government housing.  Ever live in a military barracks?
You will maintain our property in a clean and good state of repair.  Your
“home” will be subject to inspections anytime and possessions will be
inventoried.  If you want a plasma TV or Xbox 360, then get a job and your
own place.
  In addition, you will either present a check stub from a job each week or
you will report to a “government” job.  It may be cleaning the roadways of
trash, painting and repairing public housing, whatever we find for you.  We
will sell your 22 inch rims and low profile tires and your blasting stereo
and speakers and put that money toward the “common good..”
  Before you write that I’ve violated someone’s rights, realize that all of
the above is voluntary.  If you want our money, accept our rules.  Before
you say that this would be “demeaning” and ruin their “self esteem,”
consider that it wasn’t that long ago that taking someone else’s money for
doing absolutely nothing was demeaning and lowered self esteem.
  If we are expected to pay for other people’s mistakes we should at least
attempt to make them learn from their bad choices.  The current system
rewards them for continuing to make bad choices.
  AND – While you are on Gov’t subsistence, you no longer can VOTE!  Yes that
is correct.  For you to vote would be a conflict of interest.  You will
voluntarily remove yourself from voting while you are receiving a Gov’t
welfare check.  If you want to vote, then get a job.
  Alfred W. Evans, Gatesville , TX
First of all, I’m a (conservative) libertarian (small L).  Voluntarism, coupled with non-nanny-statism would be the order of the day.   With that in mind, some of the controls suggested are ones with which I disagree.  For example…
“Food” choices.  If an EBT (food stamp) recipient wants T-bone steak or Twinkies to eat – I don’t care!  Only so many funds are allocated each month, and buying steak will ‘eat up’ the funds rather quickly.
It would be nice if the purchase of TP, laundry soap and similar household items were included on the ‘approved’ list, though.
Forced birth control is repugnant to me.  And recreational drugs and body disfigurement are not on the food stamp list.  Not my problem.
The whole ‘government housing’ thing is also repugnant.  If someone wants to live in a hovel or cannot afford maintenance, it is no concern of mine.  As long as it doesn’t affect the public health and safety.   Funny how a ‘conservative’ cries for such control, but screams about the prospect of FEMA camps…
I do like the idea of (voluntary) government service to help maintain the infrastructure.  I’m not certain it should be tied to receipt of food stamps, however.
“While you are on Gov’t subsistence, you can no longer VOTE!  For you to vote would be a conflict of interest.”
WOW – what a concept!
Of course, while a compassionate State maintains some kind of a ‘safety net’ for the truly needy, I’m a little unclear how this can be administered efficiently, fairly and at a reasonable cost.
After all, it IS government of which we speak!

False Flags

(Courtesy of Brock Townsend)

EPA, FBI, DOJ, FDA, CDC, ATF: Nearly every government agency routinely plots and carries out false flag operations to justify its own existence

Via comment by Anonymous on Don’t Be Fooled by the Political Game: The Illusio…

Yesterday I posted an article asking for American citizens to send me water samples from the Animas River that the EPA has now heavily contaminated with toxic heavy metals. I want to test the water in my elemental analysis laboratory to expose the EPA’s pollution.The EPA used to prevent corporations from polluting the rivers, but now the EPA has become the polluter, the liar and the cover-up cartel. In that story, I pointed out the total absurdity of our sickening, corrupt government, where private citizens now have to conduct the science to expose the pollution of the EPA.That got me thinking… hey, wait a minute. Almost EVERY federal government agency is now functioning as a rogue entity. Nearly all of them routinely carry out false flag events in order to justify their own existence (and increase their budgets). In a very real way, U.S. government agencies have become mafia-style cartels carrying out domestic terrorism across America in order to justify their own existence.

Straws.  Camels backs.  Boiled frogs.  I truly don’t want to believe the above, because I’ve seen evidence of this piece-by-piece for years, and wrote it off to bureaucracies self-perpetuating.
I was (am) in denial.
THIS is why we have ever increasing budgets routinely asked-for and given for most government agencies – some of which have military hardware and budgets rivaling third-word countries!  (Including civilian police!)
And, of course, we have the intelligence agencies.  Secret budgets, money laundering, the E & I Bank, universal unwarranted surveillance and collusion with ‘continuing criminal enterprises’…
Come to think of it, some State and local law enforcement entities are guilty of collusion, as well.  Why else would the Mob (and it’s various permutations) be allowed to operate, largely unrestricted?  Criminal gangs?  Child porn and white slavery rings?
Sure, every now and there is some ‘big’ bust – a large smuggling tunnel with tons of weed, a drug house, some gang member holding an ‘arsenal’ (10 or 12 guns) is busted, to show the public they are holding up the public trust.
But the ring leaders and their politically-connected lackeys are rarely if ever prosecuted, or even mentioned.
Why is that?
And now (from above) …
The EPA used to prevent corporations from polluting the rivers, but now the EPA has become the polluter, the liar and the cover-up cartel. In that story, I pointed out the total absurdity of our sickening, corrupt government, where private citizens now have to conduct the science to expose the pollution of the EPA.
Game…Set…Match
*removes tin foil beanie and skulks away to the nearest basement*
tin_foil_hat_area

Gimme That Ol’ Time Research

Old-Timers will completely get this.

(Youngsters, not as much!)  :-)

I remember a time (voice fades out, looking wistfully skyward…)

When a random thought regarding some subject entered my mind,  And I wanted to know more about it. So, I checked my bookshelf for dictionaries, encyclopedias and reference books.

If THAT failed…

It was a trip to the public or college library, next chance I got, searching for similar materials and more specific ones about the subject.  Later-in-life, as a private investigator, city directories and telephone directories sometimes offered help.

And failing all that, the reference desk librarians.

But, all this took time, legwork and shoe leather.  It was what we had.

Since the early 90’s, most of us have had access to The Internet.  And now many of the same reference materials are available on line.

More quickly and with less walking.

I wonder what we old-timers will be wistfully thinking about The Internet in 10 or 20 years?

Ain’t technology grand?

Or have we been sucked in to a vortex of uber-surveillance, wherein ‘they’ can watch and record our every movement and action.  And what were look for on the ‘net, and where we shop, what we buy, how and where we travel and work?  With whom we communicate and associate?  What ideas we share?

Of course, the same data was available 25 years ago.  But took much more in-person research and surveillance.  And time.

And much as we cannot go back to dial-up, we can’t stop this ever-encroaching technology.  But we can petition the government to stop abusive information gathering, and limit our exposure – somewhat.tin_foil_hat_area

(Puts tin-foil chapeau back on and skulks back into the shadows…)

Our Tax Dollars At Work, Again

WASHINGTON (Reuters) – The Justice Department will fast track the sending of $29 million to South Carolina to help families of victims of the mass murder of nine churchgoers at a historic black church in Charleston, a Justice Department spokesman said on Friday.

An unspecified portion of the money, allocated under the government’s national Crime Victim Assistance Formula Grant program, can be used to provide services to the families of victims of the shootings at Emmanuel AME Church, spokesman Kevin Lewis said.

That’s $3.2 MILLION per family!

Can any of us who have lost family members to violence apply?  Because my ex-wife (who the government classified at the one victim in our case) received nothing!

h/t Weasel Zippers

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…

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