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This tag is associated with 51 posts

Mike Vanderboegh (A Post Script and a Bleg From Guffaw)

Yes, my friends, he is still here.  Hanging on.

My blogfriend Wirecutter posted the following:

Skype interview with Mike Vanderboegh

by Wirecutter

USA – -(Ammoland.com)- Liberty advocate, citizen journalist and self-described “smuggler” Mike Vanderboegh talked about his health, his blog and the principles of the “Three Percent” movement in an exclusive interview with this correspondent, recorded in late May. The audio file, converted to a YouTube video, is presented at the end of this introduction.

The file is a bit rough, and I need to take responsibility for that. I make no pretenses of being a videographer, and had never tried to record a Skype call before, which is how we did the interview. Since that doesn’t have a recording feature, free software was used which did not record video. Due to inexperience and lack of proper equipment, I was getting a reverberation loop or whatever you call it whenever Mike spoke — his voice going into his laptop microphone and then coming back out from his speakers after a fraction-of-a-second lag made the whole interview seem like a wasted effort. Fortunately, my son and his friend have both the software and skills to take the repetition out, so there are only a few instances of garbling. And in this case, it’s the message, not the presentation, that’s significant, and that comes through loud and clear.
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Below is the video on youtube. Please share this everywhere. Send it to your friends, share it on facebook, share it on your firearms forums and tell them to start paying serious attention around the 9 minute mark.

Here is a man who is giving (has given?) his life for the American Principles on which he stands.  He has traveled the Nation, at great personal expense, to debate issues of civil rights and liberties now largely lost to the American electorate.

My past couple of posts have asked you to take action.  One was about letting BIGGOV know we won’t stand for them blocking rights of Social Security recipients.  The second was asking you to send a message to the Troops, of thanks, via the USO.

Today, I have a third request.  I asked this once before, back in January.  Mike Vanderboegh has given so much to the cause of Liberty.  Please help his family to deal with the many hits to their finances because of his declining health.

Paypal to georgemason1776@aol.com*
Check, money order, cash, etc. to Mike Vanderboegh, PO Box 926, Pinson, AL 35126.**

Thank you for your kindness.

_______________________________________________________

(And, now for something completely different – as promised)
I would ask all of you bloggers out there to at least make the effort to post a link to www.projectwelcomehometroops.org/#22kill

22 VETERANS COMMIT SUICIDE DAILY

Even ONE of these heroes making this choice is unacceptable! (Day #10 of 22)

Unsung Heroes

There is a prevalent attitude to laud our own heroes, and minimize others.  I suspect this has to do with patriotism and nationalism.  And as far as it goes, there is nothing wrong in so doing.

However, it is also good to acknowledge others from other cultures who did what is right, rather than as they were ordered.

The many Germans who hid and smuggled out Jews; the North African Arabs who protected Jews and Christians.  There are many others unsung.

And then there’s THIS GUY (from Brock Townsend):

The Man who Saved the World

https://i2.wp.com/thelosangelesbeat.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/11/306594_10151302957148125_1314713586_n2.jpg

“A guy called Vasili Arkhipov saved the world.” –  Thomas Blanton in 2002 (then director of the National Security Archive)

Last month, October 27, 1962 marked the 50th anniversary of an event too important in world history for it to get lost amid the Halloween and other “trivial” holiday-related notifications. I therefore chose to wait until they were over to pay due honor to this truly great and heroic gentleman who is sadly almost unknown outside his mother country: Vasili Arkhipov.

At the nail-biting height of the Cuban Missile Crisis, second-in-command Vasili Arkhipov of the Soviet submarine B-59 adamantly refused to follow his commanding officers’ order to launch nuclear torpedoes against USA warships which had been dropping depth charges near his submarine in a attempt to force it to surface.

I’ve never been a fan of communism, the Soviet system or their minions.  But doing the right thing against orders is indeed brave – especially in such a system!

На Здоровье!

(Nastrovia!)
______________________________________________________
(And, now for something completely different – as promised)
I would ask all of you bloggers out there to at least make the effort to post a link to www.projectwelcomehometroops.org/#22kill

22 VETERANS COMMIT SUICIDE DAILY

Even ONE of these heroes making this choice is unacceptable! (Day #4 of 22)

Today In History, Recent and A Few Years Ago…

Muhammad-Ali-quote-on-courageMuhammad Ali (born Cassius Clay) is one of my childhood heroes.  Not so much because of specifics (being a great athlete/boxer – which he was), but because he stood for something.  And if his goals were boasts, he surpassed them.

By taking risks.

In spite of being a member of a controversial religious sect, he gave millions to charities for all races.

One of his biggest supporters was broadcaster Howard Cosell, who was unashamedly Jewish.

Hardly following the party line of radical Islam there, Mr. Ali.  Good for you!

He passed yesterday from complications due to Parkinson’s disease.  Not a serene way to go.  Just short miles from a hospital wing bearing he and his wife’s name.  For treatment of Parkinson’s.

“I AM THE GREATEST!” he used to boast.

He was.

….

Today is the 27th Anniversary of the ending to the protests in Tianamen Square, Peking, P.R.C.  We all remember that famous photo of the guy and the tank.

Here it is, in a wider view:

a everyone-knows-the-photo-of-tankman-stopping-tanks-but-this-the-real-photo-s800x571-437607-1020

Makes me think of the force of unfettered government versus the individual.

I wonder if he had heard of Muhammad Ali?

______________________________________________________
(And, now for something completely different – as promised)
I would ask all of you bloggers out there to at least make the effort to post a link to www.projectwelcomehometroops.org/#22kill

22 VETERANS COMMIT SUICIDE DAILY

Even ONE of these heroes making this choice is unacceptable! (Day #2 of 22)

REMEMBER

And, in case you forgot…

Memorial-Day

Nothing more need be said.

Except perhaps a silent prayer of thanks.

REMEMBER

Prayers For Ray Carter, Please

I don’t know Ray.  However, based on his FB cadre of friends, he is one fine man!

Please help if you can.  I remember the many times I was in dire need of help – even if it was just a friend – and folks stepped up.

ray carter

(from his FB page)

Ok. It’s been an interesting week. Early stage liver failure announced to me on Monday and while it is possible to recover – it’s mighty darned doubtful. Looking at a prognosis of 3-4 wks at the outside. Any phone calls and personal visits will be deeply appreciated, as will offers of assistance to help Mom and generally prep things for solo life for at least a bit..

Am looking to reinforce Mom’s independence and do what I can to get Masonic Charities and the Church properly involved in mom-care.

Feel free to ping/call/msg – just be warned tht if I’m tired i will try to politely push the call out if I’m just too nuked.

Thank you.

Survivalism Is Not Necessarily Ludditism

Joel writes:

Things that aren’t necessities but may as well be

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I have a book that a reader sent me a year or two ago – and I apologize but I don’t remember who sent it – It’s about a guy who took it into his head to semi-retire into the Alaskan outback, near or above the Arctic circle. You know, just go out there and build a cabin and live.

Now, that’s more-or-less the plot of Into the Wild, and I think we know how that story turned out. But this older guy, Richard Proenneke, wasn’t some overindulged and suicidally starry-eyed kid. He was an old Alaska hand and actually knew what he was doing. He built a cabin that was a literal work of art – after he got old and retired from retiring, it became a tourist attraction for really hardy tourists. It makes the Secret Lair look like a particularly disreputable shed. And he made nearly every part of it from native wood or stone or bone – hell, he carved wooden door hinges.

Every single thing he had that he couldn’t make himself had to be flown in on a little bush plane and it could only happen a few months out of the year, so space and weight were real factors. And I was looking at the photographs reproduced in the book – Proenneke was a photographer, and my only complaint about the book is there aren’t enough photographs – and in one shot of the cabin’s interior I saw…a roll of paper towels.

And I had me a chuckle. Now, here’s a package of six paper towel rolls, which I just bought today…
IMG_1322
It doesn’t weigh hardly anything, of course, but it’s bulky as hell. I suppose you could open the package and distribute the rolls around the plane, but my point is that if it needs to come by bush plane, you’d have to really want that roll of paper towels. Seems like there are more important things to which you could devote that plane space.

Except maybe there aren’t. When I was first alone out here, experimenting with ways to make due with virtually no income and really studying the difference between a want and a need, I learned that the line between the two is not always clear. Some commodities, while of course you can get along without them in the sense that you won’t actually die, are themselves so useful that it almost doesn’t matter. It’s not a question of life and death, it’s a question of quality of life. Indoor plumbing: Have I ever wasted a moment wishing I hadn’t devoted all that precious Lair space to an indoor toilet? Nope, not so much as a millisecond. To the best of my knowledge, and leaving poisonous spiders out of it, nobody ever died from using an outhouse as I originally planned. But a flush toilet is just such a massive improvement that, if you’ve got the water pressure, only an idiot would decide not to go ahead and dig for a septic system. Electricity’s the same way: Not a necessity of life, but look at all the things it makes possible.

Those are big things. There’s a myriad of little ones, like paper towels. It’s good to pay attention and learn what those things are, because it’s the little things that mark the difference between living and just surviving.

PAY ATTENTION – my personal motto.

I’ve found in my years that had I paid attention (or more attention) perhaps things would have turned our better or differently.  Perhaps not.

But almost always were worse for having not done so.

Having ‘The Talk’

No, not the birds and bees with your children, or the inane TV show.

(from the USCCA and Kevin Michalowski)

Kevin_ITF_Email_VideoPlayer_3-14-16

Sooner or later you will have to talk to your non-gun-owning friends about why you carry. You might be asked not to carry at someone’s house. Or you might be grilled on gun safety at your house when people come to visit. I can’t give you the exact words; they are your friends, not mine. But understand that…

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SO…it’s NOT just about Safety.

It’s about rights, and protection, and so much more.

There have been a few places I’ve chosen to not carry, and not by government edict, either.  It’s been about respect, perceived security, and sometimes plain ol’ convenience.

But sometimes having a civil Talk is just what seems appropriate.

Let’s Rename New Orleans!

( Stolen in full from Brock Townsend)

LET’S RENAME NEW ORLEANS!

Via Anthony “Good evening friends, I think this blog, sent to me by a dear friend, sums up my feelings exactly. It’s also a great history lesson. Enjoy. Take care, Anthony”

https://i2.wp.com/neutralgroundnews.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Lee-Circle-in-New-Orleans.jpg

I strongly approve of renaming the racist Lee Circle and tearing down the Robert E. Lee statue. I have complied a brief list of other streets, statues, institutions and buildings that also need to go.

First off, let’s rename the city New Orleans! Since the city was named after the Duke of Orleans, who had numerous affairs, rumors of murder and incestuous relations with his daughter… He also won the family farting contest and could fart “like a flute,” but to be fair that could be viewed as a positive… But I am most certain that he was probably an elitist and a racist. The name has got to go.

Let’s tear down the Margaret Haughery statue, honoring the woman who worked tirelessly for the city’s orphans and donated thousands to them, because she owned slaves.

Let’s deem any business that uses Marie Laveau’s name as racist because she owned slaves.

Let’s rename the historic Faubourg Treme, the first U.S. residential neighborhood for free blacks (and listed on the National Register of Historic Places) because it was named after Claude Treme, who shot and killed a slave.

Let’s rename Faubourg Marigny because it was named after Bernard Marigny, who despite offering low interest rates to free people of color, owned slaves. And rumor has it his first wife has an absolute “beast” to her slaves. Let’s also eliminate all of the streets he named to be on the safe side.

Let’s rename Wilkinson Street because it was named after James Wilkinson, a traitor and a spy for Spain.

Let’s rename Milneburg (as well as the streets named after Milne) because Alexander Milne, who also gave hundreds of thousands to orphanages, also owned slaves (although he emancipated some and even bought them houses). But he owned slaves – so he’s got to go.

Let’s rename Poydras Street because Julien Poydras owned slaves (although he bequeathed freedom to over 700 slaves and donated heavily to Charity Hospital, asylums, and orphanages) – sorry, he’s out.

Let’s rename General Ogden – he was involved in the White League.

Let’s also eliminate all streets named after plantation owners and their families – the list is huge but a good place to start is Bartholomew, Caffin (who also briefly owned the LaLaurie Mansion – before the atrocities, but nevertheless), Delachaise, Foucher, Burthe, Antonine, Dufossat, Valmont, Bellecastle, Robert, Soniat, Avart, Egania, Lizardi, Hurst, Roman, Eleanore, Joseph, Millaudon, Peniston, Poeyfarre, Villere, Clark, Toledano…

For obvious reasons, let’s also get rid of the street names Jefferson (after Thomas Jefferson), Jefferson Davis, and Jackson Avenue (as well as Jackson Square).

The Ursuline nuns owned slaves – let’s tear down their convent and wipe them from the history books as well. Those women have got to go.

Let’s rename Lafitte Street after the pirate Jean Lafitte– come on, who knows how many men he killed, women he raped, and slaves he traded. Let’s also boycott the bar.

Let’s rename Hennessey Street after Police Chief David C. Hennessy, this guy obviously hated Italians.

I am not sure if Isaac Delgado or Judah Touro owned slaves, but probably. They were wealthy merchants and landowners during their time. To be on the safe side let’s rename Delgado Street as well as the community college and rename Touro Hospital and the street. Touro gave thousands of dollars to the New Orleans Public Library but it is not named after him. Phew. But best to get rid of everything their name is attached to, besides, they were Jewish.

Let’s rename Howard Street after Charles T. Howard– he brought gambling to Louisiana and was totally corrupt.

Let’s rename Camp Street – it was originally called “Campo de Negro” where slaves were bought to be sold.

We should probably rename Race Street because even though it was named after a planned racetrack – way too controversial.

Let’s rename Sophie Wright – she was a cripple and probably a virgin since she never married and you know what that means (LESBIAN)!

Let’s rename all of the Muses Streets and anything after Greek mythology – PAGANS!

Let’s rename Magazine Street because many historians believe it was named for magasin a poudre (ammunition warehouse) and I am totally against guns.

How about renaming everything after numbers? Of course, forsaking number 13 and 69 for obvious reasons.

I would suggest naming a street after black Creole Alexander Aristide Mary, who fought against the Separate Car Act and for the rights of blacks during Reconstruction, but… he killed himself and is obviously going to hell.

This is just a small and modest list. I know there are hundreds of others that need to be renamed, changed, torn down, but if anything comes out of this for God’s sake – LET’S RENAME NEW ORLEANS!

Yes, it’s reductio ad absurdum.
Not to mention, any who proudly served  in the Confederate military are considered Americans, by an act of Congress!  And any monuments erected for them may not be legally removed – by Law!
But it point’s out the flaws in ubiquitous political correctness and a dearth in historical knowledge on the part of the politically-correct mob.
Ignorant fools!

In Remembrance

I wasn’t born for another eleven years when this happened, but as a student of history and an American it gets to me.  Much as the JFK assassination, The Marine Barracks, Khobar Towers, The U.S.S Cole and The Twin Towers attacks did during my life.

Meeting that Navy veteran who had served on the Arizona on Veteran’s Day this year did as well.

Please take a moment of silence today.

Because.

Happy Birthday, Dad, Belatedly

Dad1

Yesterday, November 16, would have been my Father’s 100th birthday. Instead, he passed at age 61.

There were so many life lessons he was unable to impart to me.

Calm reflection (he was an angry rage kind of guy); Moderation (he was an alcoholic and a compulsive overeater); Mechanical ability (I once saw him attempt to repair a leaky radiator hose with Scotch tape(!)  I was a kid, and even I knew that wouldn’t work).

But I knew he loved me.

After all, when I was born prematurely (and my twin brother didn’t make it) he hurriedly ran to the nearest church to pray for my survival.

He tried to make me an athlete, as he had been.  Alas, my developing a physical disability @ age 12 stopped those attempts in it’s tracks.  And from that point forward, he was unclear how to relate to me.

I only saw him cry once.  When he told me how proud he was of my graduating the Eighth Grade, and that I never asked him for money.  To be fair, I didn’t know I was allowed to!  When my Mother passed, he kept his grief private.

I’m certain his childhood was horrific.  A stern father who had been a Marine and railroad policeman, and his having grown up poor during the Depression.

He had not been raised to be a hugger.  I don’t remember him ever hugging me.  A firm handshake was the order-of-the-day.

But, he did teach me a few important things.  Loyalty (be true to your friends – he was to his); Honesty (your word IS your bond); and yes, Love.

He loved his wife (my mother) with all his heart.  Watching her die @ age 41 of emphysema must have been horrible. (I was in the Second Grade, what did I know?)  And in spite of the fact they were estranged, my (half)sister was his jewel.  He was very protective of her, which probably in-part caused the estrangement.  But she was another connection to his wife, which I don’t think she ever saw.

And he kept his heart disease hidden from me until it was too late.

He was flawed – he was human.

I love you and miss you, Dad.  Happy Birthday!

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…

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