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Dangerous Things For Kids!

(from The Art of Manliness, in part)

Even though the modern world isn’t any more dangerous than it was thirty or forty years ago, it feels like a more perilous place. Or, more accurately, we inhabit the world today in a way that’s much more risk averse; for a variety of very interesting and nuanced reasons, our tolerance for risk, especially concerning our children’s safety, has steadily declined.  So we remove jungle gyms from playgrounds, ban football at recess, prohibit knives (even the butter variety) at school, and would rather have our kids playing with an iPad than rummaging through the garage or roaming around the neighborhood.

Unfortunately, as we discussed in-depth earlier this year, when you control for one set of risks, another simply arises in its place. In this case, in trying to prevent some bruises and broken bones, we also inhibit our children’s development of autonomy, competence, confidence, and resilience. In pulling them back from firsthand experiences, from handling tangible materials and demonstrating concrete efficacy, we ensconce them in a life of abstraction rather than action. By insisting on doing everything ourselves, because we can do things better and more safely, we deprive kids of the chance to make and test observations, to experiment and tinker, to fail and bounce back. In treating everything like a major risk, we prevent kids from learning how to judge the truly dangerous, from the simply unfamiliar.

Fortunately, we can restore the positive traits that have been smothered by overprotective parenting, by restoring some of the “dangerous” activities that have lately gone missing from childhood. The suggestions below on this score were taken both from 50 Dangerous Things (You Should Let Your Children Do), as well as memories from my own more “free range” childhood. If you grew up a few decades back, these activities may seem “obvious” to you, but they’re less a part of kids’ lives today, and hopefully these reminders can help spark their revival.  While each contains a element of danger and chance of injury, these risks can be thoroughly mitigated and managed by you, the parent: Permit or disallow activities based on your child’s individual age, maturity level, and abilities. Take necessary precautions (which are common sense and which I’m not going to entirely spell out for you; you’re a grown-up, not a moron). Teach and demonstrate correct principles, and supervise some practice runs. Once you’ve created this scaffolding of safety, however, try to step back and give your child some independence. Step in only when a real danger exists, or when your adult strength/dexterity/know-how is absolutely necessary. And don’t be afraid to let your kids fail. That’s how they learn and become more resilient.

In return for letting your children grapple with a little bit of healthy risk, the activities below teach motor skills, develop confidence, and get kids acquainted with the use of tools and some of the basic principles of science. Outside any educational justification, however, they’re just plain fun — something we’ve forgotten can be a worthy childhood pursuit in and of itself!

23 Dangerous Things You Should Let You Kids Do

Unlike many of you out there, I grew up in a city.  And, my Dad was largely absent.  I was given boundaries, though.  Don’t cross these streets; Don’t play with these kids;  Let us know where you are;   Be home for dinner @ 6 o’clock.

Other than that, I was pretty much left to my own devices.  Playing in old abandoned houses and construction sites, climbing into open manholes and irrigation conduits.  Picking through discarded trash for treasures.  Making rocket fuel and fireworks.  Dissecting unexploded fireworks.  Dirt clod fights.  Rubber band guns with projectiles!

I wasn’t foolhardy, but I wasn’t a namby-pamby either!

I remember when my Dad’s .22 rifle went missing.  He accused me of taking it, but was most upset I hadn’t asked! (I didn’t take it – it was stolen and later recovered by the PD)

From what I’ve observed, most kids (and most adults) don’t play outside or explore anymore.  Instead, they are inside getting carpal tunnel…

(And not in the traditional way!  😛 )

Toss your kid outside, without their electronics.  And tell ’em not to return until dinner-time.

They might learn something!

Coolness

via Theo Spark

My first thought was of Frank Frazetta, but this isn’t art, and there was no half-nude woman.

Dammit!

Ruger 10-22

I was never much of a .22 guy.  Probably because I wasn’t brought up with them.  Most of my firearms life has been with centerfire pistols. (I did acquire a Ruger semiautomatic and a S&W revolver in .22 to use in training, late in the game.)

But my first .22 was a Ruger 10-22 rifle.  Basic model.  Ordinary walnut, open sights, blue.  (Eventually, I did acquire a couple ‘hi-cap’ magazines for her, when the Clinton’s shoved their so-called ‘assault weapons ban’ on the public.

Of course, when my vault was taken, so were the pistol, revolver and rifle.

And, I frankly forgot about them.

But, The Firearm Blog (bless their hearts!) reminded me.

If you are looking for a reliable, inexpensive Christmas gift for the new shooter in your family (or for yourself!) this one is it!

How to Buy a Firearm From The CMP? Part 2: Ordering Your Weapon

In the previous previous installment, we looked at how to assemble our eligibility package for the Civilian Marksmanship Program. In this installment, we will look at how to actually order a rifle from the Program. Ordering is not a particularly difficult process, so this post will not be very long. To order from the CMP, you can navigate the website to the ordering page located at this link. You will be presented with this text:

Ordering Information

 

 

Rifles and receivers may only be ordered through mail order. The CMP does not accept telephone, fax, or online orders for firearms. Ammunition, parts and other surplus items may be ordered by phone, fax, or online if CMP has proof of customer eligibility on file. If you have questions on what is required to order from the CMP, please visit our Eligibility Requirements web page.

ORDERING BY MAIL:
MAIL ORDERS AND ALL REQUIRED ENCLOSURES TO:
CIVILIAN MARKSMANSHIP PROGRAM
ATTN: SALES
1401 COMMERCE BLVD
ANNISTON, AL 36207 

There is more to the page, but for rifle orders we will be focused solely on mail-order, as the CMP does not accept orders for rifles of any other kind. Even in this Internet Age, it is mail-order or bust with the CMP. That’s OK, though, as your primary method of payment will be the Postal Money Order; this is a secure form of payment, purchasable from your local Post Office, which is commonly used for gun sales via GunBroker and other gun commerce websites. In addition to a Money Order, you will need a CMP Order Form. This comes in a convenient file that you can fill electronically from your computer, available here or at the CMP’s website, and gives the CMP all the information they need to run a NICS check on a purchaser. The form must be notarized, but if you do not have a notary on hand, know that most banks offer free notary services to their account holders. I was able to simply walk into my bank and request notarization of the CMP Order Form, and walk out not ten minutes later.

Once that is complete, and you have copies of your proof of citizenship, date of birth (both satisfied by a birth certificate or passport), CMP club affiliation, and proof of marksmanship course, head to the Post Office and purchase a Money Order. Just bundle copies of your eligibility documentation with the filled out CMP order form and the Money Order for the requisite amount, mail it, and you’ve completed your order for the CMP! Note that other forms of payment are accepted by the CMP, but in my opinion the Money Order is the most hassle-free. You can pay by credit card or personal check, but since – in my case – I need to drop the packet off at the Post Office anyway, I almost always use a Postal Money Order for any firearms purchase.

The CMP says that rifle orders take 2-4 weeks to complete. In my case, it took 19 days from sending in the order form to receiving the email that told me my rifle was in the mail headed my way. The CMP says it ships rifles via FedEx overnight, so maybe I can expect my rifle next week!

– See more at: http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2015/12/05/how-to-buy-a-firearm-from-the-cmp-part-2-ordering-your-weapon/#sthash.JsBFgy90.dpuf

How To Buy A Gun From The CMP!

Well, part one, anyway.

How to qualify…

(courtesy of The Firearm Blog)

How to Buy a Firearm From The CMP? Part 1: Becoming Eligible

Ever since the news broke that the CMP would be able to sell M1911 handguns to the shooting public, thanks to a provision in the 2016 National Defense Authorization Act, I have received a lot of emails and comments asking me “how do I qualify for the CMP?” Well, you’re in luck: Not only will I be walking our readers through the process, but it’s easier than you think!

My regular readers will know that I’m a fan of long, multi-part series that go in-depth into a historical or technical subject. However, don’t be fooled by the “Part 1” in the title; I intend to keep this series as short and sweet as possible, while still adding the detail you need to get qualified for the CMP. I’ve broken it into parts for your convenience, and so that those who want to buy rifles now do not have to wait for my full review of the CMP Service Grade M1 I have ordered. This first post will cover how to put together eligibility. I have already completed this process from top to bottom, and received on the day that I write this an email confirming that my eligibility has been validated and I am now on the list to receive a rifle.

The CMP does have on their website a list of requirements, but their explanations of what counts and does not count, and how to order can be vague, and much of the information you need is buried behind links on the CMP’s home page. You can follow the hyperlink here to reach the page you’ll need, but if navigating the website itself, scroll down and click the link called “SALES & SERVICES”, and once that page has loaded, scroll down again and click the link called “RIFLE SALES”. Then, scroll down that page to reach the tab labeled “ELIGIBILITY REQUIREMENTS”.  Now, you should be presented with a page with this text:

REQUIREMENTS FOR PURCHASE

By law, the CMP can sell surplus military firearms, ammunition, parts and other items only to members of CMP affiliated clubs who are also U.S. citizens, over 18 years of age and who are legally eligible to purchase a firearm.

PROOF OF U.S. CITIZENSHIP:

You must provide a copy of a U.S. birth certificate, passport, proof of naturalization, or any official government document (When using a military ID to prove citizenship, must be an E5 or above) that shows birth in the U.S. or states citizenship as U.S.

PROOF OF AGE:

You must provide proof of age. Usually proof of citizenship also provides proof of age. In those cases where it may not, a driver’s license is sufficient.

MEMBERSHIP IN CMP AFFILIATED ORGANIZATION:

You must provide a copy of your current membership card or other proof of membership. This requirement cannot be waived. The CMP currently has over 2,000 affiliated organizations located in many parts of the country. CMP Club Member Certification Form- If your CMP affiliated club does not issue individual membership cards, please have the club fill out the CMP Club Member Certification Form and return it with your order.

Membership in many of these organizations costs $25.00 or less and can be accomplished online. A listing of affiliated organizations can be found by clicking on our Club Search web page at http://ct.thecmp.org/app/v1/index.php?do=clubSearch. If you have any difficulty in locating a club, please contact the CMP at 256-835-8455 or by emailing CMP Customer Service. We will find one for you. In addition to shooting clubs, the CMP also has several special affiliates. Membership in these organizations satisfies our requirement for purchase. These special affiliates include: Congressionally chartered veterans’ organizations such as the VFW, AL, DAV, MCL, etc. U.S. Military services (active or reserves), National Guard, to include retirees. Professional 501(c)3 law enforcement organizations and associations such as the FOP, NAPO, NSA, etc. The Garand Collector’s Association is a CMP Affiliated Club. You can download a Garand Collector’s Association Application Form.

Note: Club membership IS required for purchase of rifles, parts, and ammunition.

Club membership is NOT required for instructional publications or videos or CMP memorabilia.

MARKSMANSHIP OR OTHER FIREARMS RELATED ACTIVITY:

You must provide proof of participation in a marksmanship related activity or otherwise show familiarity with the safe handling of firearms and range procedures. Your marksmanship related activity does not have to be with highpower rifles; it can be with smallbore rifles, pistols, air guns or shotguns. Proof of marksmanship participation can be provided by documenting any of the following:

  • Current or past military service.
  • Current or past law enforcement service
  • Participation in a rifle, pistol, air gun or shotgun competition (provide copy of results bulletin).
  • Completion of a marksmanship clinic that included live fire training (provide a copy of the certificate of completion or a statement from the instructor).
  • Distinguished, Instructor, or Coach status.
  • Concealed Carry License.
  • Firearms Owner Identification Cards that included live fire training. – FFL or C&R license.
  • Completion of a Hunter Safety Course that included live fire training.
  • Certification from range or club official or law enforcement officer witnessing shooting activity. Complete the CMP Marksmanship Form to certify your range firing and the required marksmanship related activity for an individual to purchase from the CMP.

No proof of marksmanship required if over age 60. Proof of club membership and citizenship required for all ages. NOTE: Proof of marksmanship activity is not required for purchase of ammunition, parts, publications or memorabilia.

BE LEGALLY ELIGIBLE TO PURCHASE A FIREARM:

The information you supply on your application will be submitted by the CMP to the FBI National Instant Criminal Check System (NICS) to verify you are not prohibited by Federal, State or Local law from acquiring or possessing a rifle. Your signature on the Purchaser Certification portion of the purchase application authorizes the CMP to initiate the NICS check and authorizes the FBI to inform CMP of the result. IMPORTANT: If your State or locality requires you to first obtain a license, permit, or Firearms Owner ID card in order to possess or receive a rifle, you must enclose a photocopy of your license, permit, or card with the application for purchase.

IMPORTANT:

If your State or locality requires you to first obtain a certificate, license, permit, or Firearms Owner ID card in order to possess or receive a rifle, you must enclose a photocopy of your certificate, license, permit, or card with the application for purchase. Rifle shipments to NY and NJ must be made to a state licensed dealer. You must provide a copy of the dealer’s license with your order form. Rifle shipments to CA must be made to a State licensed dealer or may be made to individual homes, providing that a CA Certificate of Eligibility and a Curio and Relic License are provided. Rifle shipments to CT must be made to licensed or dealer or may be shipped directly to the customer if a C&R license is provided.

As a result of CT Bill 1160 and Bill 13-220 , which revised CT Bill 1160, all CT customers purchasing rifles to be delivered in CT must have the rifle shipped to a CT licensed dealer or must provide us with a copy of their current Type 3 (C&R) FFL license. We can ship directly to a customer’s home if they possess a C&R license.

NY, NJ and CT customers who have already mailed their rifle orders to CMP should provide custserve@thecmp.org with dealer information or order cancellation instructions. Information can also be faxed to 256-835-3527 or mailed to CMP Customer Service, (Attn: FFL Order), 1401 Commerce Blvd., Anniston, AL 36207.

This page tells you everything you need to know to achieve eligibility for the Program, but even once I had read this, I still had many questions. In my case, I had a copy of my birth certificate, a couple of ways to achieve the third qualification that would require a little legwork, and nothing to meet the club requirement. In 2011, I had completed an Appleseed course, but I over the course of two moves, I had lost the green slip that certified my completion. I also had completed a handgun course for my concealed carry license, but, likewise that paper was in another state (safe and sound, but still a week away by mail, and I wanted to put in the order as soon as possible). Fortunately, I remembered the name of my Appleseed instructor, and was able to get in touch with him via the Appleseed Forums. He emailed me my green slip, which I printed out immediately and put together with my growing packet of information. I could equally have had a scan of the handgun course certificate emailed to me, or, if push came to shove, I could have had a range officer at the local range certify me via the CMP’s online marksmanship certification form. My understanding is that almost any shooting course will suffice for this requirement, but if you’re unsure you can always call the CMP before 4:00 PM Eastern Time on a weekday to check.

Many believe that joining a CMP-affiliated club will be one of the most difficult steps in the process; it’s actually one of the easiest. In my case, I used the CMP’s club search function to find the Louisiana Shooting Association, which allowed me to join online for the princely sum of ten dollars and fifty cents ($10.50). I called up the club’s treasurer to inquire what sort of documentation I would need, and he told me that while they do issue membership cards via email, I could simply use my receipt of payment to the club for the CMP. Bingo, I was in business.

It’s as simple as that! In Part 2, we’ll look at how to actually order from the CMP!

– See more at: http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2015/12/04/how-do-you-buy-a-rifle-from-the-cmp-part-1-putting/?utm_source=Newsletter&utm_medium=Email&utm_content=2015-12-08&utm_campaign=Weekly+Newsletter#sthash.FyoARwqb.dpuf

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