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This tag is associated with 5 posts

Long Gun vs. Handgun In Home Defense

(from TFB, in part)

Long Gun vs. Handgun in Home Defense – Maneuverability Differences Overblown

It used to be conventional wisdom to have a 12 gauge at the ready for self defense. Then, slowly, the tactical world fell back in love with the handgun under the guides of maneuverability within the home. The thinking was that the handgun, being a smaller package, was better for one to clear their home. Combined with the higher capacity and ease of reloading, the handgun, was per thinking, the easier to use weapon.

This is, of course, before one even brings up the ability to suppress the weapon, which is good for the defender to maintain their hearing.

However, Thunder Ranch posits that this significant maneuverability advantage is overstated. While sure, the shotgun is a longer weapon, when presented to a target its really not significantly longer than the handgun at full arm extension in the proper firing position. They back this up with a quick demonstration of a common Mossberg 500, an over-under and a full-size 1911.

There was one point that the instructor made in the video that I think is poignant (paraphrased): “Would you rather fire one shot from a handgun at a guy running at you with a knife or a shotshell?

I,  for one, will take the shotshell.

Unfortunately, I have wee ones floating around so the need to keep the weapon locked up while easily accessible trumps my desire for 00 buck…

Yea, I remember those ‘olden days’, when home defense was defined by having a shotgun. (This was the 70’s).   I remember a discussion in some gun store with a proprietor, while drooling over an Ithaca Model 37 Deerslayer Police Special, and making conversation, suggesting it would be a ‘fine, upland bird gun’.  (This was before I owned any).  And the sales guy responded, “Would be good for turning around in a hallway, as well!”  🙂

Well, my friends, we seem to have gone full circle.

I would take the shotshell, as well, if I were ever fortunate enough to own another DSPS, again.

 

Martial Cultism

What is Martial Cultism?

It is the belief that your particular skill, machine, tool or system is better, even if evidence exists to the contrary.

We see snippets of this constantly in gun magazines, self-defense magazines and on-line bulletin boards.

  • .45 versus 9mm (or .38, .357 or .40)
  • semiautomatic versus revolver
  • taekwondo versus shotokan (or gung fu, muy tai, or the myriad other fighting styles)
  • shotgun versus rifle
  • Colt versus Smith & Wesson

ad infinitum, ad nauseum

KEADS posted a snippet of this on Facebook the other day.  Seems a student was lauding his Kimber to the exclusion of all others (?)  I asked if this was pre or post MIM parts?  ;-P

Reminiscent of the pre-64 Winchester Rifle discussions of my youth.

Or a high school discussion I had with a learned friend regarding European Medieval Swords versus Japanese Swords.  Or as he put it, The Cult of The Japanese Sword.

Recently both the U.S. Military and the FBI have endorsed converting to 9mm hollow points (from .40 S&W and .45 ACP), as the newer 9mm showed better stopping power. then the wider, heavier ammunition.

It appears as though a new cult has formed.

Frankly, I’d like to see the data.  If it’s inanimate, like gelatin, I’m not certain of their conclusion.

This Shouldn’t Happen To ANY Gun…

So, here I am in the mid-1980’s, ‘working’ as a private investigator.  And I find myself in Phoenix Police HQ (7th Ave/Washington).

No, I hadn’t been arrested.

The shoe leather part of the job.  This, of course, was pre-Internet.

And I needed a copy of a motor vehicle accident report to get info on a participant.  Their name, address, DL#, DOB, and if/how they were cited in said accident.

Which of course, they were.

SO, I’m standing at the counter in the main lobby, along with other ne’er-do-wells (lawyers, insurance adjusters), when a voice calls out my name.

“GUFFAW!”  (Of course, he really didn’t yell Guffaw, as if commanding the people around him to laugh. :-))

I turn around, and here’s my Criminalistics professor from college!  He was one of the criminalists at PPD.  I was surprised he recognized me – it had been maybe 7-8 years since I had seen him.

He asked if I were busy.  I responded not particularly, and he offered me a tour of the PPD crime lab!

You must remember, this was before all the CSI-based TV; the procedurals where the cops catch and convict bad guys based on scientifically-determined physical evidence.  It was many times asking questions and shoe leather which ruled the day.

But, I still thought it was cool!

The water-filled bullet trap they shot into to obtain exemplars of spent bullets.  The cool old photos of how it was back in the day.  The wall of firearms!

Yes, they had (and presumably still have) a wall with just about every model of gun you could imagine.  For comparisons, testing, all manner of stuff.  Most had been confiscated from arrestees.

So they were mostly junk – the good stuff having been returned to their lawful owners or sold at auction.

They even would sometimes loan firearms to the undercover guys, to strengthen their street cred.  No police .38/.357 revolvers for these guys!  (It WAS the 80’s)

And there she was, a shotgun.  Short enough to conceal under a knee-length coat.  An over/under 12 gauge.

Sawn off to maybe 14 inches!  With a hacksaw!

A Diana-grade engraved shotgun!  Looked like it had been hand sawn and then dragged behind a car!  No doubt recovered from some hood.

500px-Sawed-off_Browning_O-U

From the internet – way too nice to be the original!

I was almost in tears.

He did tell me that one officer went undercover and carried her.  No one ever thought he was a cop until it was too late – I mean, what cop would defile such a fine machine like that?

Is it the Bates Motel…

bates-motel-tv-show_0or the Hotel California, where you check in, but you don’t check out?  (Roach Motel?)

In another lifetime, I was working as a security guard, and sometime private investigator.  My company would draft me for undercover assignments, which got me out of the guard thing for a while.  I didn’t mind being drafted.

On one of these occasions, I was sent to a small town in the mountains North of Phoenix.  Worked undercover in a variety store as a management ‘trainee’ whose real function was to spy on all the employees and management.  Great stuff!

In such a position, I was quite concerned about my safety.  If something untoward was going on, I didn’t want to get ‘made’ and ratted out, or worse.  So, I carried a gun.  Sadly, I’d sold my handguns for rent money (AGAIN – I was young, this was the 70s – sigh) and the only firearm I owned was my Ithaca DSPS Model 37 police pump.  Not exactly concealable on-the-person.

Ithaca Model 37

So I toted her from under the motel bed into my car and back using my Dad’s weather-beaten trench coat as a gun rug!  Sadly, she had to stay in the car while I was working.

And the motel was on the main drag through town; single-story, L-shaped, rough hewn, not unlike a(n) (in)famous motel of Hitchcock movie fame.  I remember Triple A rating it, but not excellent.  And I was so stoked not being a guard and doing undercover work, I’d wind down after my 12 hour shift with pizza and beer, while writing my daily report (dropped in the mailbox the next morning en route to work – this was WAY before the Internet!).  Then I’d watch some late night movie on the 13″ B&W TV supplied in the room.

The first night the movie was In Cold Blood.

Not exactly restful slumber.  But, I did this for a couple weeks, didn’t find any opium dens in the back room of the store, or mob-related activity, and returned home.  Back to the guard stuff.  Sigh.

But, I never looked behind the motel to see if there was a swamp containing cars.  Guess I’ll never know…

Psycho_115Pyxurz

Unabashed Shotgun P0rn

THE HOLY GRAIL: A unique triple-barrelled shotgun made for a Scots aristocrat has been sold at auction for £43,000 (then $66,000). The shotgun – dubbed the “Holy Grail” – was made in April 1891 for John Adrian Louis Hope, 1st Marquess of Linlithgow and the seventh Earl of Hopetoun. The three-barrelled ejector, 16-bore gun, with three triggers, was designed by renowned Edinburgh gun makers John Dickson & Son and is the only one of its kind. Its origins were identified after the gun was taken to a valuing event at Hopetoun House, South Queensferry, and it has now been sold at Holt’s auction in London, to a private collector, after fierce bidding from around the world.

h/t Neatorama

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…