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This tag is associated with 67 posts

How to Safely Clear Your Home

(from The Art of Manliness)

How to Safely Clear Your Home

Click on the above link – it’s a substantial article!

Slicing the pie

Of course, I suspect most of you out there have a passing familiarity with how to do this.  I certainly do.  When I owned my two-bedroom, one bath 740 sq ft house (for 18 years), I was a victim of three burglaries!  And I cleared the house after each one.

And I was WRONG in so doing!

THIS IS WHAT THEY PAY THE POLICE FOR!  My ego and sense of violation got the better of me.  AND, I taught in every one of my classes to leave the scene and call the police.

(Those who cannot do teach?)

Still, it’s good to have this knowledge.  What if no police are available?

But, regardless, it should only be done in exigent circumstances…

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Ruger 10-22

I was never much of a .22 guy.  Probably because I wasn’t brought up with them.  Most of my firearms life has been with centerfire pistols. (I did acquire a Ruger semiautomatic and a S&W revolver in .22 to use in training, late in the game.)

But my first .22 was a Ruger 10-22 rifle.  Basic model.  Ordinary walnut, open sights, blue.  (Eventually, I did acquire a couple ‘hi-cap’ magazines for her, when the Clinton’s shoved their so-called ‘assault weapons ban’ on the public.

Of course, when my vault was taken, so were the pistol, revolver and rifle.

And, I frankly forgot about them.

But, The Firearm Blog (bless their hearts!) reminded me.

If you are looking for a reliable, inexpensive Christmas gift for the new shooter in your family (or for yourself!) this one is it!

More Wisdom From The Queen

…of SNARK! (Tamara, of course!)

Lessons from ECQC…(in part)

ECQC changed my life.

For instance, since ECQC I’ve finally started practicing something I’d long preached and began carrying a can of Fox Labs OC around with me. It’s become more important to me to have a solid middle ground option between “harsh language” and “bust a cap in someone’s ass”.

It’s made me think a lot more about deescalation, how persistence does not automatically equal threat, that presenting a weapon (or even revealing its presence) without the space or time to employ it correctly can cause a lot more problems than it solves. Letting a guy who’s within a dozen feet of you know you have a gun doesn’t necessarily deter him; it just lets him know you have a gun. It’s up to him whether that’s a deterrent or not.

Physical fitness has become more important to me, too. All tangled up under someone who’s beating your ass and about to pull your gun out and shoot you with it isn’t the time to find out you’re completely out of breath, too.

That gets me out the door every morning, and I’d about ready to look into adding some simple calisthenics to what’s already become a routine mile walk. Baby steps, but I’m already healthier now than I’ve been in years.

I’m OLD.  Well, older than Tam.  Disabled.  Infirmed.  Overweight.  Have chronic pain issues.

With regard to PT (physical training), well, it just doesn’t happen.  I am truly an armchair adventurer (with apologies to LTC Brown)

But reading of Tam’s adventures and commitment has my motor running. (if nothing else).  I know, based on my age and infirmities that I will not ever have the physique of a Navy Seal.

But I need to do something.

I just signed up for a Medicare Advantage Plan.  Part of the coverage is I can go to any gym and work out!  (under a program called Silver Sneakers).  It’s about time I do SOMETHING.

We’ll see whether or not I’m motivated to do so…

How To Spot A Concealed Handgun

The Art of Manliness (a blog to which I sometimes refer) not only addresses etiquette, style and proper behavior, but also delves into ‘manly’ things such as camping, hunting, shooting, unarmed combat and other esoterica.  (Of course, many of these subjects may be of interest to women, as well!) 🙂

A recent guest post was entitled as above.  I’m posting it below, in it’s entirety, not just to entertain and inform, but to show those who do carry behaviors and appearances which may bring to them unwarranted attention.

Enjoy!

How to Spot a Concealed Handgun

By A Manly Guest Contributor on Oct 21, 2016 02:10 pm

The following is an excerpt from 100 Deadly Skills: Survival Edition — The SEAL Operative’s Guide to Surviving in the Wild and Being Prepared for Any Disaster. A follow-up to Clint’s first bestseller — 100 Deadly Skills: The SEAL Operative’s Guide to Eluding Pursuers, Evading Capture, and Surviving Any Dangerous Situation — this new survival edition offers primers on any survival situation imaginable, from wilderness scenarios, to terrorism and kidnappings, to natural disasters.

100-deadly-survival_final

CONOP: Concept of Operations; COA: Course of Action; BLUF: Bottom Line Up Front

Individuals who carry a handgun professionally are well attuned to the range of mannerisms that can indicate the presence of a concealed weapon within their vicinity. Civilians, too, can learn to familiarize themselves with these signs and signals. When combined with suspicious behavior, the suspected presence of a concealed weapon should put bystanders on high alert.

Body Language: People carrying handguns tend to subconsciously telegraph the location of the weapon via their body language. They may reflexively palpate the gun to make sure the weapon is still safely in its holster, subtly re-position the weapon prior to sitting or standing, or shift their weight away from nearby bystanders to avoid accidental contact with or theft of the weapon.

Asymmetry: Another telltale sign is asymmetry in clothing. Guns are heavy and bulky, and thus will betray signs of their presence to anyone who’s paying attention. An outside-the-waistband holster may cause a visible midline bulge, while an ankle holster may cause a bulge or tightening of the fabric at the lower leg. A gun held in a jacket pocket will weight down one side of the jacket unevenly.

Environment: Hot or inclement weather can make concealed weapons easier to spot. Rain, wind, or sweat can reveal the outline of a gun, which will generally be much easier to hide under multiple layers of cold-weather clothing.

Negligence: Weapons are also frequently exposed due to temporary negligence, flashed or inadvertently dropped as a gunman reaches for his wallet. Dropped weapons are an all-too-common scenario at public urinals, where inexperienced perpetrators may thoughtlessly unzip their pants — thereby releasing the tension that was holding up the holster.

The post How to Spot a Concealed Handgun appeared first on The Art of Manliness.

Warning Shots

As reminded to us by Tamara

See this? Don’t do this?

“We have a lot of people outside our house, yelling and shouting profanities,” he said. “I yelled at them, ‘Please leave the premises.’ They were showing a firearm, so I fired a warning shot and, uh, we got somebody that got hit.”

“Someone was shot?” the operator asked.

“Well, I don’t know if they were shot or not, ma’am,” he told her. “I fired my warning shot like I’m supposed to by law. They do have firearms, and I’m trying to protect myself and my family.”

This dude messed up by the numbers, killed a man, and wrecked his life and his family’s life, in addition to those of his victim and his victim’s family, all because he was stupid and believed a lot of the sort of BS self-defense advice you pick up from well-meaning ignorant morons in gun stores and on the internet.

Folks, self defense with a firearm is no joke. This is life and death stuff right here; it literally does not get more serious than that. With great power comes great accountability.

I think it was Jeff Cooper who said warning shots were tactically unsound.  First, they alerted the bad guys as to your exact location.  Second, they wasted a possibly valuable round of ammunition.  He recommended generally against them, but if one absolutely had to, put one into a solid backstop or an advancing assailant.  THAT should get their attention!
My initial CCW instructor taught us to remember every round sent downrange is a potential million-dollar lawsuit.
REMEMBER those Four Rules (see sidebar)
(Guffaw in AZ does not dispense legal advice.  Find your own lawyer, and get training and liability insurance!)

(H)ugs & (K)isses

HK-USP-45-lefttThere seems to be a love/hate thing whether or not your average gunnie likes Heckler & Koch (H&K).  Most folks seem to hold an opinion, and it’s either completely positive or completely negative.

(In the interest of full disclosure, I owned an H&K 91, semiautomatic knockoff.  Which means (maybe) as the receiver was NOT of original German manufacture, I didn’t actually own one (?)  For the record, I loved her!  She took all the original accessories, including magazines.)

Never had an H&K pistol, though…

I’ve known two guys who did.  One, the late, great Bob Hall, who owned (and carried) several P7 single-stacks over the years.  And one of my students whom I met @ TMCCC.  He had a USP in .40 S&W, which he bought before we had really begun training.

He liked it (having nothing to really compare it to.)

I probably would have directed him to another brand and caliber…

John Wilson (of wilsonblog) posted recently regarding his unabashed love for his USP, in .45 ACP.

He concluded:  But even with those minor problems the USP is for me. I trust my life with it every day of the week. That says everything. 

Of course, we have the counterpoint oft mentioned in the Internet, of their dearth of customer service.  And that quirky thing of how does one pronounce Heckler & Koch, without offending at least some folks?  (different opinions about with regard to proper pronunciation).

Would I own one?  Perhaps.  But, as I’ve no funds – even the lesser expensive on my list have to wait.

Training Classes Do Not Make For A Better Shooter

(from TFB)

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According to Tim Herron of Team Sig Sauer there is a lot of misinformation from Armchair Experts. He breaks down five things he advises to be a better shooter.

  1. Dryfire. It’s real. And it works. It also costs NOTHING but an investment of your time and the benefits are endless.
  2. Training Classes do not make a better shooter. Practicing what you learn from those classes is what makes you a better shooter. Training classes merely gives you new ideas to practice on.
  3. Gear is never the answer. You can improve with what you have.
  4. Focus your practice on purposeful things. Things that really apply. Literal tons of repetitions both in dryfire and live fire and immense amount of PURPOSEFUL rounds down range.
  5. Finally, stop with the delusions of self grandeur. Want to start truly improving? Quit BS’ing each other on the Internet and get your rear end to work. You don’t learn this stuff by osmosis. And you certainly don’t get better at any of this by repeating the baseless BS you read or heard some supposed “hardcore operator or competitor” say out of context to someone else 3rd person.

Tim has some good points and some of them seem obvious. However I do argue against the “gear is never the answer”. If gear is not the answer then why do people not compete with Hipoints? To a certain degree gear matters. There is a reason people don’t use Uncle Mike’s holsters for serious shooting.  Also gear can help with some shortcomings one may have. For example, red dots on handguns is easier and quicker for people with poor eyesight.

What are you thoughts on Tim’s analysis and advice? To read his entire article check it out here at MASF.

Being an ‘armchair expert’, I resemble that remark!  🙂  Seriously, I no longer have the means to get to the range (or the desert) on a regular basis.  And my ‘edge’ (if I ever had one) has significantly rounded.  😦

Having said that, dreaming of more or better gear (if only I had another, different, newer gun…) or (if I had the opportunity) tossing lead downrange at paper villains willy-nilly doesn’t solve the problem!  It doesn’t even address it.

Because there’s no focus.  No purpose (see above).

Yeah, plinking is loads of fun, but doesn’t sharpen one’s skill set.  Muscle memory is degradable.

HOWEVER, dry practice (the aforementioned dry firing), coupled with presentation, trigger control, sight picture and compressed-surprise brake can make for a fun and valuable learning experience!  And an inexpensive means of keeping up one’s skill set.

Spoiled

The brilliant and beautiful Tamara posted recently the dearth of correct tactics and technique with regard to television shows and weapon technique.

She, of course, is correct.

I’ve posted in these pages regarding the same stuff – the guy in the show 24, for example.  Cup-and-saucer does not Weaver or Isosceles make…

But these martial faux pas go back decades.

jbThe Untouchables, M Squad, The Detectives, The FBI (in color!)  And don’t even bring up the spy genre – The Man From UNCLE (for example).  And the movies!  James Bond to Dirty Harry…

And thousands of other TV shows and films.

Weapon technique is terrible!  Cup-and-saucer.  Or worse yet, grabbing one’s wrist with the off hand.  Or supporting the shooting arm with the other under the forearm!

Shooting rifles and submachine guns from the hip!  Because it looks cool…

And the gun hand up next to the face.  Because it frames our hero with a gun next to their face, NOT because it’s a good idea!

And the ubiquitous fingers on triggers!

And many of us (mostly male) took their initial learning ques from these ‘techniques’.  This is why women are generally better students.  They don’t have to unlearn as much.

We do need to be reminded that these media are for entertainment, and are not documentaries or training aids, however.

But sometimes some of these Hollywood presentations are just too ludicrous to be able to suspend disbelief and enjoy.  Remember T.J. Hooker?

Having been a semi-professional magician in my youth, I’ve had much the same reaction to watching magicians on television.  Either I know the secret (or know something) and the performance loses it’s entertainment value.

Spoiled?  Sometimes.

Variety IS Life-Saving

(from Into The Fray – USCCA Blog – Kevin Michalowski)

I know this is the second week in a row I have talked about comments to Into the Fray videos, but I feel it is very important to point out that when it comes to defensive training, there is no ONE single way that people must do anything.
Every situation is dynamic. Every person is different. We are trying to present broad-based information from a variety of sources. What we present here is not THE way, it is A way. If you disagree, please do so politely and logically. We can all learn from each other, share knowledge, and exchange ideas. Nobody knows it all, but the more we share, the safer we will all be.
More Tools?
Yeah, it is a cliché, but every cliché starts with the truth somewhere along the line. If your only tool is a hammer, everything starts to look like a nail. Broaden your firearms knowledge by listening, thinking critically, and exchanging your views. We are all in this together.

https://www.usconcealedcarry.com/ccw-permits-skyrocketing-minnesota/

I’m a big believer in the Bruce Lee modality.  Essentially, kata, like standing still and punching paper, is not a survival skill unto itself.  Sifu Lee called kata ‘vertical death’.  So is doing the same thing, the same way.  If you are under attack, you could lose more than your lunch if you are trying to get into a specific fighting stance.  I’m a big believer in The Weaver Stance.  This doesn’t mean I don’t know how to shoot Isosceles or one-handed or weak handed.

Or while laying on the ground, on my side or my back!  Sights will line up, even if you are upside down!

Being disabled, and having a fused hip, kicking someone in the head is not good for me tactically.  Knees are better, as are sticky and trapping hands – close quarter work.  Rapidly ‘going prone’ is also probably not an option for me.  Neither is sprinting 50 yards to find cover.  Ambling sometimes presents a challenge.

Use the tools and skills available to you, specifically!  Change it up, as necessary.

OOPS!

oops

One only hopes they are training to defend our individual liberties and loved ones, and not to take them away…

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…