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WWII

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Incoming @ 0400

I usually fall asleep between 1120 and midnight.  And arise between 0600 and 0700.

(NO, this is not an invitation to call!  I’ve my morning shower-dress-meditation ritual)

Rarely am I disturbed. (Insert joke here)  Except, of course, the battle sometime between 0130 and 0400 between my bladder and I.  Who IS Master of my bladder?  (It’s apparent, not me!)  😛

ANYWAY, my roomie and I share a ‘Jack and Jill’ bathroom.  And, with her sleep schedule, sometimes I hear her in the loo.  Sometimes I hear her TV.

This is not usually any big deal.

BUT, last night, after my traditional loss of the battle of wills with my bladder, I returned to bed, anticipating a return to sleep in a minute-or-so.  When BOOM!  Followed by yet another BOOM!  And another!

It was a bit after 0400.

I thought ‘great – I awakened my roomie’ and she turned on her television.  And was watching The Battle of Britain, or The Guns of Navarone! 

Too loudly.

But I was in error.

Usually, when she does that (a rarity) she hears the error of her way and turns it down in a few minutes.  The noises continued, unabated for at least twenty!

And, I knew it wasn’t yet Independence Day!

So, I bailed out of bed, listening to the ongoing explosions, crossed the no-man’s land of the bathroom, and rapped on her door.

Yes?  She replied.

I opened the door slightly and asked, “Is it you making all this noise, or is it the neighbors?”

She answered, “It’s the neighbors.  And I’ve already called the police on them!”

😛

About ten minutes later, the booming stopped.

Video gaming?!  The neighbor is a young woman who seems to have a revolving door of male roommates.  Perhaps this was one of them?

ANYWAY, back to sleep I went (at around 0500) and rolled out a bit after 6.

Somewhat tired.

I hope to get an afternoon nap later today.

Sigh.

More History ‘They’ Didn’t Tell Us About

USA: Mysterious Nazi submarine from WWII discovered in Great Lakes

Niagara Falls| Divers from the U.S coast guard took part this morning (in January, reportedly), in a delicate wreck recovery operation to bring to the surface a Nazi submarine discovered two weeks ago at the bottom of Lake Ontario.

The U-boat was spotted for the first time by amateur scuba divers in late January and they had contacted the authorities. Archaeologists associated with Niagara University of  and master divers from the U.S Coast Guard were mobilized on site to determine what it was, and they soon realized that they were dealing with a German submarine that sank during World War II.

A wreck recovery vessel  of the Great Lakes Shipwreck Historical Society was mandated to refloat the ship and bring it back to Niagara Falls, where it must be restored before becoming a museum ship. The delicate recovery operation took nearly 30 hours to complete, but the submarine was finally brought down on the bank with relative ease.

http://worldnewsdailyreport.com/wp-content/uploads/2016/02/plongeurs.jpg

The divers of the U.S. Coast guard braved the frigid water temperature to go attach cables to the wreck for the recovery operation.

The submarine was identified as the UX-791, a unique experimental German submarine, based on the U-1200 model, and known to have participated in the “Battle of the St. Lawrence”. It  was reported missing in 1943 and was believed to have been sunk near the Canadian coast.

Professor Mark Carpenter, who leads the team of archaeologists, believes that the U-boat could have traveled up the St-Lawrence River, all the way to the Great Lakes, where it intended to disturb the American economy.

A report from the dated from February 1943 suggests, that the ship could have attacked and destroyed three cargo ships and two fishing vessels, even damaging the USS Sable (IX-81), an aircraft carrier of the U.S. navy that was used for training in the Great Lakes, before finally being sunk by anti-sub grenades launched by a Canadian frigate.

“We have known for a long time that the Nazis had sent some of their U-boats in the St-Lawrence River, but this is the first proof that they actually reached the Great Lakes,” Professor Carpenter told reporters. “This could explain the mysterious ship disappearances that took place in the region in 1943, and the reported “Battle of Niagara Falls” which had always been dismissed as a collective hallucination caused by fear.”

The restoration of the submarine could take more than two years, but once completed, the museum ship is expected to become one of the major tourist attractions of the region.  (WND)

….

I remember my Father telling me about the German saboteurs captured on Long Island, and, of course the attacks against Alaska and California – when popular media largely ignored or pooh-poohed these stories.  (During WWII)

It occurred to me that we have a different flavor of the same thing in much of the media, now, what with attacks by Muslim extremists sometimes being reported as ‘workplace violence’ or outright being ignored by them.

There is ALWAYS an agenda, whether promoted or enforced by government or unseen forces, with regard to how ‘the public’ is informed.  Or not informed.

And it’s up to us to separated the wheat from the chaff.  With diligence, not paranoia.

WELL, MY FRIENDS – BURNED AGAIN.  THIS WAS SENT TO ME BY A FRIEND (UNKNOWINGLY, I’M CERTAIN) AS FACT.  TURNS OUT THE ‘SOURCE’ (YET AGAIN) WAS WORLD NET DAILY.

ALWAYS CHECK YOUR SOURCE MATERIAL!

tin_foil_hat_area

In Remembrance

I wasn’t born for another eleven years when this happened, but as a student of history and an American it gets to me.  Much as the JFK assassination, The Marine Barracks, Khobar Towers, The U.S.S Cole and The Twin Towers attacks did during my life.

Meeting that Navy veteran who had served on the Arizona on Veteran’s Day this year did as well.

Please take a moment of silence today.

Because.

When Veterans Day Became Real

As I’ve aged, I’ve developed more of an appreciation for our military veterans.

I don’t know why, exactly?

Maybe it’s because, with my childhood Life plans having failed, due to my leg disability, I was unable to join the largest, least-exclusive club in the World (Service Veterans).  And I’ve been able to observe, albeit from a distance, the brotherhood, camaraderie and sacrifice imbued in those men and women.

ValorAnd with the addition of the instant news cycle, see some of the physical damage caused to them.

On previous Veterans Days (when I was employed) I made it a point to walk around on break and shake hands of those I knew had served and say “Thank You!”  I know it’s not much, especially for persons my age who returned from Vietnam and were denounced as war criminals and spat-upon.  And the Korean War Vets who were (and are) pretty much largely ignored by the media.

I was accompanying my roommate to another of her doctor’s appointments on November 11 this year, and there was an older guy (my age?) with the jacket and cap, embroidered with his service particulars.  I didn’t see what they were.  I made a point to walk over to him and shake his hand.  It was the very least I could do.

After her appointment, J. wanted to get a bite-to-eat, so we stopped at a restaurant we sometimes frequent. And before our meal arrived, in walked another veteran.  Also with an embroidered cap and patched jacket. Significantly older.  A larger man, with silver hair.  With his wife.

After they were seated and had placed their orders, I got up and walked over to them.  I excused myself, apologized for interrupting, and explained I just wanted to thank him for his service.  He smiled, shook my hand vigorously, and his wife beamed.

Then I saw the identifying patch on his sleeve.

US Patches_0011a

I left hurriedly back to our table, so he wouldn’t see me cry.

A Triumph of the Human Spirit

Sometimes, I need a lift.  Not just a ‘good time’, but something to remind me of others trials and tribulations in Life. And how they overcame them.

Life – It’s not just a board game or a cereal, anymore.

Being a fan of movies, I look to them as a source.  (We’re not talking Pauly Shore, here, people.)

I watched one last night.  The Great Escape.  A fine film in it’s own right, based on a true and sad story about men fighting for freedom.  What they endured, how they overcame, and sometimes were killed.

If you’ve not seen it, you should.  Or read the book.  (You Tube gives me nothing FTC!)

I’m Guessing She’s Not An N.E.A. Member?

Stormbringer reminded us of a teacher of yore.  We need more like her, today.

Here.  Now.

Meet Captain Nieves Fernandez, the only known Filipino female guerrilla leader and school teacher. When the Japanese came to take the children under her care she shot them. She didn’t hide in a closet, she didn’t put up a gun free zone sign, she shot them in the face with her latong (a home made shotgun).

Note she has an M1 carbine with a 15 round magazine – illegal in the Gun Control States of California and Massachusetts.

She then went on to kill over 200 Japanese soldiers during the war with a group of commandos and holds the distinction as the only female commander of a resistance group in the Philippines.

In this photo she is showing U.S. Army Private Andrew Lupiba how she used her bolo to silently kill Japanese sentries during the occupation of Leyte Island.

Can you imagine an American school teacher in the day & age having the chutzpah to pull off a class act like this?

h/t Theo Spark

RIP William Overstreet

(thanks to Neatorama)

RIP William Overstreet, A World War II Fighter Ace Who Flew Through the Eiffel Tower

William Overstreet Jr. died in Roanoke, Virginia at the age of 92. During World War II, he flew a P-51 Mustang fighter plane. During the liberation of France, he performed one of the most daring fighter combat actions ever witnessed.

You can read an extensive wartime biography here. Mr. Overstreet was a daring and aggressive pilot. During training, he did loops around the Golden Gate Bridge. Later, in Europe, during the spring of 1944, he had escort duty on a bomber mission. He chased after a German fighter plane through central Paris:

The German’s engine was hit, and Bill stayed on his tail braving the intense enemy flak. His desperation undoubtedly growing, the German pilot aimed his plane at the Eiffel Tower and in a surprising maneuver, flew beneath it. Undeterred, Bill followed right behind him, scoring several more hits in the process. The German plane crashed and Bill escaped the heavy flak around Paris by flying low and full throttle over the river until he had cleared the city’s heavy anti-aircraft batteries.

(Len Krenzler/Action Art)

For his wartime record, the French ambassador to the United States presented Mr. Overstreet with the Legion of Honor in 2009.

-via Ace of Spades HQ

Another Hero Gone…

(stolen borrowed from Old NFO – because our history IS important!Guffaw)

Another Veteran is gone…
Major Thomas Griffin, a navigator on the Doolittle Raid was called home Tuesday. He passed in a VA home in northern Kentucky at age 96. At the next reunion of the surviving Doolittle Raiders in Fort Walton Beach, where they trained for the mission, they will turn Maj. Griffin’s goblet upside down, and there will be only four left upright.
Maj. Griffin parachuted to safety over China and eluded capture, eventually making it back stateside. He later flew bombing missions over North Africa until he was shot down in 1943, spending the remainder of the war in a German POW camp.
Years ago the President of Hennessy Company presented a bottle of 1896 vintage “Very Special Hennessy” cognac to General Jimmy Doolittle, in honor of his birth year and it was decided that the last two survivors would toast the fallen with it. Due to their advanced age it was decided that they would make the toast this year, before there were none left.
The private ceremony will be attended only by the surviving Raiders, the Raiders’ historian, Tom Casey, manager of the Doolittle Raiders Association, and two Air Force cadets. They will conduct a roll call of the names of all the Raiders, and when Griffin’s name is called, Lt. Col. Richard Cole, at age 97 the oldest survivor, will give a report on Griffin, announcing that he has left us.
At the end of the reading of names, the white-gloved cadets will pour the cognac into the goblets of the survivors, and they will drink their special toast: “To those who have gone.”
The final four survivors are Lt. Col. Cole of Comfort, Texas; Lt. Col. Robert Hite of Nashville, Tennessee; Lt. Col. Edward Saylor of Puyallup, Washington, and Master Sgt. David Thatcher of Missoula, Montana.
RIP Major, know that you were an example to an entire country and gave America hope!
To the Major and his memory!
hennessy
h/t JP

Peace Sign

peace sign

Nice ‘toon.  I remember when the peace sign was called ‘the track of the American Chicken, when all Americans right of hippiedom automatically assumed it stood for laziness, things unclean, drug use and anti-American beliefs to say the least?  Now it’s become iconic, ubiquitous…

So, I did some research.

The peace sign (or symbol) was derived in the late 50’s in Britain, by protesters against nuclear weapons.  They co-mingled the semaphore signals for the letters ‘N’ and ‘D’  (nuclear disarmament).

peace 3

Thank goodness the Left hasn’t compromised Winston Churchill’s iconic symbol for VICTORY!

churchill

 

Part of ‘The Greatest Generation’ Passing…

USS Lagarto

Old NFO reluctantly reminds us about yet ANOTHER segment of those who battled evil in WWII.  Those who are passing before us.

The Naval Submariners.

Part of said post, below.  Thank you for reminding us, good sir!

~The U.S. Submarine Veterans of World War II disbanded at the end of its convention Sept. 7 in Norfolk, Va. Local chapters now must decide whether to continue operating under another name or to dissolve as well.

A large group at one time, now the YOUNGEST member is 86, and the oldest is over 100, and they have less than 1000 members left…~

This made me wonder about a couple things:  How much longer before ALL the WWII Veterans are gone?  And

The War On Terror(ism) is so fragmented, so diverse, so compartmentalized.  Will there even BE organizations to remind us of the brave actions of our warriors, both military and civilian, who kept us from further harm?

Or will subsequent regimes make such organizations illegal?

"Round up the usual suspects."

In Loving Memory…